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Approaching Etuaptmumk - introducing a consensus-based mixed method for health services research.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263112
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
Ross Baker
Astrid Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pabrum
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27438
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
532688
Keywords
Cold Climate
Consensus
Health Services Research/methods
Health Services, Indigenous/organization & administration
Humans
Population Groups/ethnology
Program Evaluation
Quality Control
Abstract
With the recognized need for health systems' improvements in the circumpolar and indigenous context, there has been a call to expand the research agenda across all sectors influencing wellness and to recognize academic and indigenous knowledge through the research process. Despite being recognized as a distinct body of knowledge in international forums and across indigenous groups, examples of methods and theories based on indigenous knowledge are not well documented in academic texts or peer-reviewed literature on health systems. This paper describes the use of a consensus-based, mixed method with indigenous knowledge by an experienced group of researchers and indigenous knowledge holders who collaborated on a study that explored indigenous values underlying health systems stewardship. The method is built on the principles of Etuaptmumk or two-eyed seeing, which aim to respond to and resolve the inherent conflicts between indigenous ways of knowing and the scientific inquiry that informs the evidence base in health care. Mixed methods' frameworks appear to provide a framing suitable for research questions that require data from indigenous knowledge sources and western knowledge. The nominal consensus method, as a western paradigm, was found to be responsive to embedding of indigenous knowledge and allowed space to express multiple perspectives and reach consensus on the question at hand. Further utilization and critical evaluation of this mixed methodology with indigenous knowledge are required.
PubMed ID
26004427 View in PubMed
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Evidence for an altered balance between matrix metalloproteinase-9 and its inhibitors in calcific aortic stenosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53495
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2003 Sep;76(3):681-8; discussion 688
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2003
Author
Jari Satta
Jani Oiva
Tuula Salo
Heidi Eriksen
Pasi Ohtonen
Fausto Biancari
Tatu S Juvonen
Ylermi Soini
Author Affiliation
Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Oulu, Finland. jari.satta@oulu.fi
Source
Ann Thorac Surg. 2003 Sep;76(3):681-8; discussion 688
Date
Sep-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aortic Diseases - complications - enzymology
Aortic Valve Stenosis - complications - enzymology
Calcinosis - enzymology
Disease Progression
Female
Gelatinase A - biosynthesis - genetics
Gelatinase B - biosynthesis - genetics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
RNA, Messenger - biosynthesis
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1 - biosynthesis - genetics
Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 - biosynthesis - genetics
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Recently, aortic valve stenosis has been demonstrated to exhibit increased expression of certain matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and this has relevantly raised the question about possible interdependency between these and their tissue inhibitors. We sought to assess the expression of elastolytic MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs) in nonrheumatic aortic stenosis. METHODS: The study comprised 30 stenotic and six noncalcified human aortic valves. To measure the expression levels and the amount and molecular forms of gelatinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) and TIMPs (1, 2), in situ hybridization, gelatin zymography, and reverse zymography were carried out. Antielastin staining by a monoclonal BA-4 antibody was performed to investigate the changes of one of the main substrates of these MMPs, and to substantiate the nature of the putative MMP- synthesizing cell. The cases were also immunostained with an antibody to alpha-smooth muscle actin. Inflammatory cell characterization was managed by monoclonal mouse antibodies (UCHL-1, L26, and PGM-1). RESULTS: Compared with the controls, the calcific valves showed increased mRNA expression and activation of MMP-9, and this was associated with typical characteristics of valve disease. MMP-2 mRNA production was rare, but proMMP-2 protein was detected in all valves. In agreement with the interdependency between MMP-9 and its inhibitors, a suggestive imbalance came out in diseased valves. CONCLUSIONS: The disproportion between MMP-9 and its tissue inhibitors may favor a persistent MMP activation state within the calcific valve and likely contribute to the valvular remodeling process in the setting of developing aortic stenosis.
PubMed ID
12963177 View in PubMed
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Indigenous Values and Health Systems Stewardship in Circumpolar Countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287164
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Nov 27;14(12)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-27-2017
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
G Ross Baker
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pambrun
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 Nov 27;14(12)
Date
Nov-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Circumpolar regions, and the nations within which they reside, have recently gained international attention because of shared and pressing public policy issues such as climate change, resource development, endangered wildlife and sovereignty disputes. In a call for national and circumpolar action on shared areas of concern, the Arctic states health ministers recently met and signed a declaration that identified shared priorities for international cooperation. Among the areas for collaboration raised, the declaration highlighted the importance of enhancing intercultural understanding, promoting culturally appropriate health care delivery and strengthening circumpolar collaboration in culturally appropriate health care delivery. This paper responds to the opportunity for further study to fully understand indigenous values and contexts, and presents these as they may apply to a framework that will support international comparisons and systems improvements within circumpolar regions. We explored the value base of indigenous peoples and provide considerations on how these values might interface with national values, health systems values and value bases between indigenous nations particularly in the context of health system policy-making that is inevitably shared between indigenous communities and jurisdictional or federal governments. Through a mixed methods nominal consensus process, nine values were identified and described: humanity, cultural responsiveness, teaching, nourishment, community voice, kinship, respect, holism and empowerment.
PubMed ID
29186925 View in PubMed
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Indigenous Values and Health Systems Stewardship in Circumpolar Countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292205
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 11 27; 14(12):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
11-27-2017
Author
Susan Chatwood
Francois Paulette
G Ross Baker
Astrid M A Eriksen
Ketil Lenert Hansen
Heidi Eriksen
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Josée Lavoie
Wendy Lou
Ian Mauro
James Orbinski
Nathalie Pambrun
Hanna Retallack
Adalsteinn Brown
Author Affiliation
Institute for Circumpolar Health Research, Yellowknife, NT X1A 3X7, Canada. chatwood@ualberta.ca.
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017 11 27; 14(12):
Date
11-27-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cultural Competency
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
International Cooperation
Policy Making
Population Groups
Abstract
Circumpolar regions, and the nations within which they reside, have recently gained international attention because of shared and pressing public policy issues such as climate change, resource development, endangered wildlife and sovereignty disputes. In a call for national and circumpolar action on shared areas of concern, the Arctic states health ministers recently met and signed a declaration that identified shared priorities for international cooperation. Among the areas for collaboration raised, the declaration highlighted the importance of enhancing intercultural understanding, promoting culturally appropriate health care delivery and strengthening circumpolar collaboration in culturally appropriate health care delivery. This paper responds to the opportunity for further study to fully understand indigenous values and contexts, and presents these as they may apply to a framework that will support international comparisons and systems improvements within circumpolar regions. We explored the value base of indigenous peoples and provide considerations on how these values might interface with national values, health systems values and value bases between indigenous nations particularly in the context of health system policy-making that is inevitably shared between indigenous communities and jurisdictional or federal governments. Through a mixed methods nominal consensus process, nine values were identified and described: humanity, cultural responsiveness, teaching, nourishment, community voice, kinship, respect, holism and empowerment.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29186925 View in PubMed
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A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261034
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
Jennifer Redvers
Peter Bjerregaard
Heidi Eriksen
Sahar Fanian
Gwen Healey
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Michael Jong
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Janice Linton
Nathaniel Pollock
Anne Silviken
Petter Stoor
Susan Chatwood
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
636900
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Mental health
Needs Assessment
Population Groups/ethnology
Population Groups/statistics & numerical data
Primary Prevention/organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Suicide/prevention & control
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Background. Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals, families and communities. The persistence of suicide has made it clear that more needs to be done. Objective. Our aim was to undertake a scoping review of the peer-reviewed literature on suicide prevention and interventions in Indigenous communities across the circumpolar north. Our objective was to determine the extent and types of interventions that have been reported during past decade. We want to use this knowledge to support community initiative and inform intervention development and evaluation. Design. We conducted a scoping review of online databases to identify studies published between 2004 and 2014. We included articles that described interventions in differentiated circumpolar Indigenous populations and provided evaluation data. We retained grey literature publications for comparative reference. Results. Our search identified 95 articles that focused on suicide in distinct circumpolar Indigenous populations; 19 articles discussed specific suicide-related interventions and 7 of these described program evaluation methods and results in detail. The majority of publications on specific interventions were found in North American countries. The majority of prevention or intervention documentation was found in supporting grey literature sources. Conclusion. Despite widespread concern about suicide in the circumpolar world and active community efforts to promote resilience and mental well-being, we found few recorded programs or initiatives documented in the peer-reviewed literature, and even fewer focusing specifically on youth intervention. The interventions described in the studies we found had diverse program designs and content, and used varied evaluation methods and outcomes. The studies we included consistently reported that it was important to use community-based and culturally guided interventions and evaluations. This article summarizes the current climate of Indigenous circumpolar suicide research in the context of intervention and highlights how intervention-based outcomes have largely remained outside of peer-reviewed sources in this region of the world.
PubMed ID
25742882 View in PubMed
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