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American Indian women cancer survivors' perceptions and experiences with conventional and non-conventional mental health care for depressive symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292668
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 Jul 02; :1-20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-02-2018
Author
Catherine E Burnette
Jessica Liddell
Soonhee Roh
Yeon-Shim Lee
Hee Yun Lee
Author Affiliation
a School of Social Work , Tulane University , New Orleans , USA.
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 Jul 02; :1-20
Date
Jul-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Despite cancer and depression being disproportionately high for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women, such cancer survivors' help-seeking practices and perceptions related to depression are absent in extant research. A broader context of historical oppression has set the stage for unequal health outcomes and access to quality services. The purpose of this article was to explore AI women cancer survivors' experiences with conventional mental health services and informal and tribally-based assistance, as well as barriers related to mental health service utilization.
A qualitative descriptive study methodology, with qualitative content analysis, was used to examine the experiences of AI women cancer survivors as they related to help-seeking experiences for depressive symptoms. The sample included 43 AI women cancer survivors (n?=?14 breast cancer, n?=?14 cervical cancer, and n?=?15 colon and other types of cancer survivors).
Since receiving a cancer diagnosis, 26 (62%) participants indicated they had feelings of depression. Some participants (n?=?13) described mixed perceptions of the mental health service system. Generally, participants viewed families and informal support systems as primary forms of assistance, whereas conventional services were reported as a supplementary or 'as needed' forms of support, particularly when the informal support system was lacking. Participants received help in the forms of psychotropic medications and psychotherapy, as well as help from family and AI-specific healing modalities (e.g. sweat lodges and healing ceremonies). Stigma and confidentiality concerns were primary barriers to utilizing conventional services as described by 12 (29%) participants.
Participants' help primarily came from family and tribally-based entities, with conventional mental health care being more salient when informal supports were lacking. The mixed perceptions espoused by participants may be related to a broader context of historical oppression; family and social support and tribally-based services may be protective factors for cancer survivors with depression.
PubMed ID
29962228 View in PubMed
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Understanding the social and community support networks of American Indian women cancer survivors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290949
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 Apr 02; :1-13
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-02-2018
Author
Catherine E Burnette
Jessica Liddell
Soonhee Roh
Yeon-Shim Lee
Hee Yun Lee
Author Affiliation
a School of Social Work , Tulane University , New Orleans , LA , USA.
Source
Ethn Health. 2018 Apr 02; :1-13
Date
Apr-02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Cancer is the leading cause of death among American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women, and although cancer disparities among AI women are alarming, there is little research focused on the topic of social support and cancer treatment and outcomes.
A community advisory board was used to develop and administer the project, and a qualitative descriptive study methodology was used. This research was conducted in partnership with two community-based hospitals in the Northern Plains. The sample included 43 AI female cancer survivors who were interviewed with a semi-structured interview guide. The data were analyzed using content analysis.
Emergent themes revealed that AI cancer survivors' non-familial support systems included friends (n?=?12), support groups (n?=?6), churches (n?=?10), co-workers (n?=?5), communities (n?=?4), support from health practitioners (n?=?3) and additional forms of support.
Results indicate that survivors' networks are diverse, and support broad prevention programs that reach out to churches, community groups, and online forums. These sources of supports can be enhanced through sustainable community-based infrastructures.
PubMed ID
29609476 View in PubMed
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