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The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society heart failure management guidelines update: focus on sleep apnea, renal dysfunction, mechanical circulatory support, and palliative care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134302
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Publication Type
Article
Author
Robert S McKelvie
Gordon W Moe
Anson Cheung
Jeannine Costigan
Anique Ducharme
Estrellita Estrella-Holder
Justin A Ezekowitz
John Floras
Nadia Giannetti
Adam Grzeslo
Karen Harkness
George A Heckman
Jonathan G Howlett
Simon Kouz
Kori Leblanc
Elizabeth Mann
Eileen O'Meara
Miroslav Rajda
Vivek Rao
Jessica Simon
Elizabeth Swiggum
Shelley Zieroth
J Malcolm O Arnold
Tom Ashton
Michel D'Astous
Paul Dorian
Haissam Haddad
Debra L Isaac
Marie-Hélène Leblanc
Peter Liu
Bruce Sussex
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. robert.mckelvie@phri.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2011 May-Jun;27(3):319-38
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Combined Modality Therapy
Comorbidity
Female
Heart Failure - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Heart-Assist Devices
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Kidney Function Tests
Male
Palliative Care - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Sleep Apnea Syndromes - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Societies, Medical
Survival Analysis
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The 2011 Canadian Cardiovascular Society Heart Failure (HF) Guidelines Focused Update reviews the recently published clinical trials that will potentially impact on management. Also reviewed is the less studied but clinically important area of sleep apnea. Finally, patients with advanced HF represent a group of patients who pose major difficulties to clinicians. Advanced HF therefore is examined from the perspectives of HF complicated by renal failure, the role of palliative care, and the role of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). All of these topics are reviewed from a perspective of practical applications. Important new studies have demonstrated in less symptomatic HF patients that cardiac resynchronization therapy will be of benefit. As well, aldosterone receptor antagonists can be used with benefit in less symptomatic HF patients. The important role of palliative care and the need to address end-of-life issues in advanced HF are emphasized. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of sleep apnea complicating the course of HF and the role of a sleep study for the proper assessment and management of the conditon. Patients with either acute severe or chronic advanced HF with otherwise good life expectancy should be referred to a cardiac centre capable of providing MCS. Furthermore, patients awaiting heart transplantation who deteriorate or are otherwise not likely to survive until a donor organ is found should be referred for MCS.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Cardiol. 2011 Nov-Dec;27(6):871.e721885242
PubMed ID
21601772 View in PubMed
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Attitudes of heart failure patients and health care providers towards mobile phone-based remote monitoring.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138999
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2010;12(4):e55
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Emily Seto
Kevin J Leonard
Caterina Masino
Joseph A Cafazzo
Jan Barnsley
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Centre for Global eHealth Innovation, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada. emily.seto@uhn.on.ca
Source
J Med Internet Res. 2010;12(4):e55
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cellular Phone - utilization
Feasibility Studies
Female
Heart Failure - rehabilitation
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Monitoring, Physiologic - methods
Ontario
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Patient Participation - statistics & numerical data
Professional-Patient Relations
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Remote Consultation - utilization
Self Care
Abstract
Mobile phone-based remote patient monitoring systems have been proposed for heart failure management because they are relatively inexpensive and enable patients to be monitored anywhere. However, little is known about whether patients and their health care providers are willing and able to use this technology.
The objective of our study was to assess the attitudes of heart failure patients and their health care providers from a heart function clinic in a large urban teaching hospital toward the use of mobile phone-based remote monitoring.
A questionnaire regarding attitudes toward home monitoring and technology was administered to 100 heart failure patients (94/100 returned a completed questionnaire). Semi-structured interviews were also conducted with 20 heart failure patients and 16 clinicians to determine the perceived benefits and barriers to using mobile phone-based remote monitoring, as well as their willingness and ability to use the technology.
The survey results indicated that the patients were very comfortable using mobile phones (mean rating 4.5, SD 0.6, on a five-point Likert scale), even more so than with using computers (mean 4.1, SD 1.1). The difference in comfort level between mobile phones and computers was statistically significant (P
Notes
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PubMed ID
21115435 View in PubMed
Less detail

Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference guidelines on heart failure, update 2009: diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis, device therapy and recent important clinical trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152660
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Feb;25(2):85-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Jonathan G Howlett
Robert S McKelvie
J Malcolm O Arnold
Jeannine Costigan
Paul Dorian
Anique Ducharme
Estrellita Estrella-Holder
Justin A Ezekowitz
Nadia Giannetti
Haissam Haddad
George A Heckman
Anthony M Herd
Debra Isaac
Philip Jong
Simon Kouz
Peter Liu
Elizabeth Mann
Gordon W Moe
Ross T Tsuyuki
Heather J Ross
Michel White
Author Affiliation
University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta. howlettjonathan@gmail.com
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Feb;25(2):85-105
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Canada
Clinical Trials as Topic
Consensus Development Conferences as Topic
Heart Failure - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology - therapy
Humans
Myocarditis - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology - therapy
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - diagnosis - therapy
Abstract
The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations on the diagnosis and management of heart failure in January 2006. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops and through active solicitation of stakeholders, several topics were identified because of their importance to the practicing clinician. Topics chosen for the present update include best practices for the diagnosis and management of right-sided heart failure, myocarditis and device therapy, and a review of recent important or landmark clinical trials. These recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. The present update has been written from a clinical perspective to provide a user-friendly and practical approach. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: What is right-sided heart failure and how should one approach the diagnostic work-up? What other clinical entities may masquerade as this nebulous condition and how can we tell them apart? When should we be concerned about the presence of myocarditis and how quickly should patients with this condition be referred to an experienced centre? Among the myriad of recently published landmark clinical trials, which ones will impact our standards of clinical care? The goals are to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients, resulting in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19214293 View in PubMed
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Canadian Cardiovascular Society Consensus Conference recommendations on heart failure update 2007: Prevention, management during intercurrent illness or acute decompensation, and use of biomarkers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature165499
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-45
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
J Malcom O Arnold
Jonathan G Howlett
Paul Dorian
Anique Ducharme
Nadia Giannetti
Haissam Haddad
George A Heckman
Andrew Ignaszewski
Debra Isaac
Philip Jong
Peter Liu
Elizabeth Mann
Robert S McKelvie
Gordon W Moe
John D Parker
Anna M Svendsen
Ross T Tsuyuki
Kelly O'Halloran
Heather J Ross
Vivek Rao
Errol J Sequeira
Michel White
Author Affiliation
University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. malcolm.arnold@lhsc.on.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2007 Jan;23(1):21-45
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Biological Markers
Canada
Cardiac Output, Low - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Chronic Disease
Comorbidity
Evidence-Based Medicine
Health Priorities
Heart Failure - diagnosis - prevention & control - therapy
Humans
Natriuretic Peptide, Brain
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Risk factors
Abstract
Heart failure is common, yet it is difficult to treat. It presents in many different guises and circumstances in which therapy needs to be individualized. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society published a comprehensive set of recommendations in January 2006 on the diagnosis and management of heart failure, and the present update builds on those core recommendations. Based on feedback obtained through a national program of heart failure workshops during 2006, several topics were identified as priorities because of the challenges they pose to health care professionals. New evidence-based recommendations were developed using the structured approach for the review and assessment of evidence adopted and previously described by the Society. Specific recommendations and practical tips were written for the prevention of heart failure, the management of heart failure during intercurrent illness, the treatment of acute heart failure, and the current and future roles of biomarkers in heart failure care. Specific clinical questions that are addressed include: which patients should be identified as being at high risk of developing heart failure and which interventions should be used? What complications can occur in heart failure patients during an intercurrent illness, how should these patients be monitored and which medications may require a dose adjustment or discontinuation? What are the best therapeutic, both drug and nondrug, strategies for patients with acute heart failure? How can new biomarkers help in the treatment of heart failure, and when and how should BNP be measured in heart failure patients? The goals of the present update are to translate best evidence into practice, to apply clinical wisdom where evidence for specific strategies is weaker, and to aid physicians and other health care providers to optimally treat heart failure patients to result in a measurable impact on patient health and clinical outcomes in Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17245481 View in PubMed
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Changes in circulating progenitor cells are associated with outcome in heart failure patients: a longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107110
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1657-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Ana C Alba
Spencer D Lalonde
Vivek Rao
Stephen D Walter
Gordon H Guyatt
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Heart Failure/Transplant Program, Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address: Carolina.alba@uhn.ca.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2013 Dec;29(12):1657-64
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antigens, CD - blood
Antigens, CD34 - blood
Cell Count
Colony-Forming Units Assay
Endothelial Cells - pathology
Female
Glycoproteins - blood
Heart Failure - mortality - pathology
Heart Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Heart-Assist Devices - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Oxygen - blood
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Patient Outcome Assessment
Peptides - blood
Prognosis
Stem Cells - pathology
Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2 - blood
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - mortality - pathology
Abstract
Circulating progenitor cells (CPCs) are involved in the process of endothelial repair and are a prognostic factor in cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated the association between serial measurements of CPCs and functional capacity and outcomes in heart failure (HF).
We included 156 consecutive consenting ambulatory HF patients (left ventricular ejection fraction
PubMed ID
24054922 View in PubMed
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Choices: a study of preferences for end-of-life treatments in patients with advanced heart failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155363
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 2008 Sep;27(9):1002-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Jane MacIver
Vivek Rao
Diego H Delgado
Nimesh Desai
Joan Ivanov
Susan Abbey
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, Peter Munk Cardiac Center, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 2008 Sep;27(9):1002-7
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Advance Care Planning - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Attitude to Health
Cardiotonic Agents - therapeutic use
Choice Behavior
Defibrillators, Implantable
Dyspnea
Fatigue
Female
Heart Failure - drug therapy - psychology - therapy
Heart-Assist Devices
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ontario
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to describe the treatment preferences of patients with heart failure among three distinct treatment options--optimal medical management, oral inotropes or left ventricular device (LVAD) support--to determine if there were differences in preferences between patients with mild heart failure (New York Heart Association [NYHA] Class II) and severe heart failure (NYHA Class IV), and also to determine whether quality of life, perceived severity of symptoms and overall health influenced treatment preferences.
We enrolled 91 patients who completed the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ); visual analog scales for depicting their perceived severity of overall health, dyspnea and fatigue; and a treatment trade-off tool.
The most preferred treatment options were oral inotropes, LVAD and standard medical management. There were no differences in treatment preferences between NYHA II and NYHA IV patients. Patient preferences correlated poorly with MLHFQ, symptom and overall health scores. Although not statistically significant, there was a trend toward patients with worse quality of life and symptom scores preferring more aggressive treatment.
The results of our study identified two distinct groups of patients: one group preferring treatments that prolonged survival time and another group that favored strategies that improved quality of life but reduced survival time. Treatment preferences were independent of functional or symptom status, suggesting that preferences may be decided early in the course of illness.
PubMed ID
18765193 View in PubMed
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Comparison of hospitalized solid organ transplant recipients and nonimmunocompromised patients with pandemic H1N1 infection: a retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134452
Source
Transplantation. 2011 Jul 27;92(2):230-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-27-2011
Author
Brian J Minnema
Mehul Patel
Coleman Rotstein
Tony Mazzulli
Susy Hota
Edward H Cole
Eberhard L Renner
Heather J Ross
Lianne G Singer
Shahid Husain
Author Affiliation
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Transplantation. 2011 Jul 27;92(2):230-4
Date
Jul-27-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cohort Studies
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation
Female
High-Frequency Ventilation
Humans
Immunocompromised Host
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - physiopathology - therapy
Inpatients
Male
Middle Aged
Organ Transplantation
Pandemics
Prevalence
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Transplantation
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Pandemic H1N1 influenza has been associated with a worldwide outbreak of febrile respiratory illness. Although impaired cell mediated immunity, such as that caused by transplant immunosuppression, has been identified as a risk factor for severe infection with this virus, the course of this infection has not been adequately characterized in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients in comparison with nontransplanted controls. We report our experience with severe pH1N1 infection in transplant recipients and compare this group with nonimmunosuppressed patients.
Data were retrospectively collected on all patients admitted to our institution with proven pH1N1 infection. Clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were compared between SOT recipients and nonimmunocompromised controls.
Seventeen SOT recipients and 49 controls were identified. The control group had higher baseline rates of asthma (P = 0.02) and smoking (P = 0.05) at baseline. No difference in clinical features of H1N1 infection was detected except for a greater prevalence of wheeze in the non-SOT group (P = 0.02). No statistical differences in outcomes could be detected between the groups. Several markers of severity, including use of high frequency oscillatory ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and death were slightly more frequent in the control group.
SOT recipients admitted to hospital with pH1N1 infection did not have significantly more severe outcomes of their infection compared with their nonimmunocompromised counterparts, despite their immune suppressed status.
PubMed ID
21577178 View in PubMed
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Comparison of Readmission and Death Among Patients With Cardiac Disease in Northern vs Southern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298539
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2019 Mar; 35(3):341-351
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2019
Author
Patrick J Donio
Cassandra Freitas
Peter C Austin
Heather J Ross
Husam M Abdel-Qadir
Harindra C Wijeysundera
Karen Tu
Peter Cram
Peter Liu
Howard Abrams
Jacob A Udell
Susanna Mak
Michael E Farkouh
Jack V Tu
Xuesong Wang
Sheldon W Tobe
Douglas S Lee
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2019 Mar; 35(3):341-351
Date
Mar-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Geographic factors may influence cardiovascular disease outcomes in Canada. Circulatory diseases are a major reason for higher population mortality rates in Northern Ontario, but it is unknown if hospitalized patients with cardiovascular disease experience differential outcomes compared with those in the South.
We examined 30-day and 1-year mortality and readmissions for patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), atrial fibrillation (AF), or stroke in Northern compared with Southern Ontario, using the Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database (2005-2016). Northern patients were defined as those residing and hospitalized in the Northwest or Northeast Local Health Integration Network regions. We used multiple Cox proportional hazards regression analysis for time-to-first event and Prentice-Williams-Peterson method to evaluate repeat and multiply admitted patients.
A total of 47,745 Northern and 465,353 Southern patients hospitalized with AMI (n = 182,158), HF (n = 130,770), AF (n = 72,326), or stroke (n = 127,844) were studied. Rates of first readmission were higher among Northern patients for AMI (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 1.32), HF (HR, 1.16), AF (HR, 1.21), and stroke (HR, 1.27) compared with Southern patients (all P
PubMed ID
30825954 View in PubMed
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Donor management in cardiac transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187511
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Nov;18(11):1217-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2002
Author
Diego H Delgado
Vivek Rao
Heather J Ross
Author Affiliation
Toronto General Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2002 Nov;18(11):1217-23
Date
Nov-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain Death - physiopathology
Canada
Heart Transplantation
Humans
Tissue Donors - statistics & numerical data
Tissue and Organ Procurement
Abstract
The most important limitation in organ transplantation is donor availability. Canada is facing a serious situation with respect to organ donation rates and transplantation. The number of patients listed for heart transplant continues to increase while the number of available donors has plateaued. Several steps can be taken to address this growing mismatch. The proper identification and assessment of potential donors together with improvements in medical management may increase the donor pool. Additionally, the use of marginal donors and the development of new organ preservation techniques may lead to an increase in the number of potential heart transplants in Canada. This paper summarizes the identification, evaluation and management of heart transplant donors, and defines strategies to improve procurement activity in heart transplantation.
PubMed ID
12464986 View in PubMed
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Effects of folic acid fortification and multivitamin therapy on homocysteine and vitamin B(12) status in cardiac transplant recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180780
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 2004 Apr;23(4):405-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2004
Author
Santiago G Miriuka
Loralie J Langman
Eitan S Keren
Steven E S Miner
Orval A Mamer
Diego H Delgado
Jovan Evrovski
Heather J Ross
David E C Cole
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
J Heart Lung Transplant. 2004 Apr;23(4):405-12
Date
Apr-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
5-Methyltetrahydrofolate-Homocysteine S-Methyltransferase - genetics
Adult
Canada
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Ferredoxin-NADP Reductase - genetics
Folic Acid - blood - therapeutic use
Food, Fortified
Heart Transplantation
Homocysteine - blood - drug effects - genetics
Humans
Hyperhomocysteinemia - blood - drug therapy
Male
Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase (NADPH2) - genetics
Methylmalonic Acid - blood
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
Hyperhomocysteinemia is a frequent finding after cardiac transplantation, but increased folate intake induces a decrease in total homocysteine concentrations. In 1998, food in Canada was fortified nationwide with folic acid. We assessed the impact of routine folate fortification on homocysteine concentrations in our cardiac transplant population.
In 18 subjects, we measured total homocysteine (tHcy), serum folate, and cobalamin concentrations in 1997 (before folate fortification) and in 1998 (after fortification). We repeated the analysis after specific multivitamin supplementation for 10 weeks.
We found a significant decrease in baseline tHcy concentrations and in folate concentrations between 1997 and 1998. However, we also found a decrease in serum cobalamin concentrations. We found a correlation between decreased cobalamin concentrations and the methionine synthase A2756G genotype, but not with other common polymorphisms associated with homocysteine metabolism. After multivitamin supplementation, we observed a trend toward further decrease in tHcy concentrations and a significant increase in serum folate and cobalamin concentrations. Finally, we measured serum methylmalonic acid concentrations, an index of tissue cobalamin status. We did not find a correlation between increased methylmalonic acid concentrations and decreased serum cobalamin, perhaps related to the confounding effect of altered renal status on methylmalonic acid excretion.
National folate fortification was associated with decreased tHcy and increased folate concentrations in our cardiac transplant population. Additional administration of vitamin supplements induced a further decrease in tHcy and an increase in folate. Finally, folate fortification unveiled cobalamin deficiency in some patients, associated with the methionine synthase A2756G mutation.
PubMed ID
15063399 View in PubMed
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