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11 records – page 1 of 2.

[Asthma induced by exercise and cold air].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302319
Source
Duodecim. 1988;104(6):446-51.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988

Cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms among subjects with and without hypertension: the National FINRISK Study 2002.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301017
Source
European Journal of Public Health. 2014 Apr;24(2):237-43. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckt078. Epub 2013 Jun 22.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Ikäheimo TM
Lehtinen T
Antikainen R
Jokelainen J
Näyhä S
Hassi J
Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S
Laatikainen T
Jousilahti P
Jaakkola JJ
Source
European Journal of Public Health. 2014 Apr;24(2):237-43. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/ckt078. Epub 2013 Jun 22.
Date
2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cardiovascular diseases
Complications
Epidemiology
Cold Temperature
Female
Finland
Humans
Hypertension
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Exposure to cold weather increases blood pressure (BP) and may aggravate the symptoms and influence the prognosis of subjects with a diagnosis of hypertension. We tested the hypothesis that subjects with hypertension alone or in combination with another cardiovascular disease (CVD) experience cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms more commonly than persons without hypertension. This information is relevant for proper treatment and could serve as an indicator for predicting wintertime morbidity and mortality.
METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire inquiring of cold-related symptoms was obtained from 6591 men and women aged 25-74 yrs of the FINRISK Study 2002 population. BP was measured in association with clinical examinations. Symptom prevalence was compared between subjects with diagnosed hypertensive disease with (n = 395) or without (n = 764) another CVD, untreated diagnosed hypertension (n = 1308), measured high BP (n = 1070) and a reference group (n = 2728) with normal BP.
RESULTS: Hypertension in combination with another CVD was associated with increased cold-related dyspnoea (men: adjusted odds ratio 3.94, 95% confidence interval 2.57-6.02)/women: 4.41, 2.84-6.86), cough (2.64, 1.62-4.32/4.26, 2.60-6.99), wheezing (2.51, 1.42-4.43/;3.73, 2.08-6.69), mucus excretion (1.90, 1.24-2.91/2.53, 1.54-4.16), chest pain (22.5, 9.81-51.7/17.7, 8.37-37.5) and arrhythmias (43.4, 8.91-211/8.99, 3.99-20.2), compared with the reference group. Both diagnosed treated hypertension and untreated hypertension and measured high BP resulted in increased cardiorespiratory symptoms during the cold season.
CONCLUSION: Hypertension alone and together with another CVD is strongly associated with cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms. As these symptoms may predict adverse health events, hypertensive patients need customized care and advice on how to cope with cold weather.
PubMed ID
23794677 View in PubMed
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Diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism is associated with more cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302314
Source
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2017 Jul;129:116-125. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.04.022. Epub 2017 May 4.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2017
Author
Ikäheimo TM
Jokelainen J
Hassi J
Hiltunen L
Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi S
Laatikainen T
Jousilahti P
Peltonen M
Moilanen L
Saltevo J
Näyhä S
Source
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice. 2017 Jul;129:116-125. doi: 10.1016/j.diabres.2017.04.022. Epub 2017 May 4.
Date
2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood glucose
Cardiovascular diseases
Epidemiology
Cold Temperature
Metabolism
Adverse effects
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
Complications
Female
Glucose Intolerance
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Abstract
AIMS: Diabetes and impaired glucose metabolism cause metabolic, neural and circulatory disturbances that may predispose to adverse cooling and related symptoms during the cold season. This study assessed the prevalence of cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms in the general population according to glycaemic status.
METHODS: The study population consisted of 2436 men and 2708 women aged 45-74years who participated in the National FINRISK cold sub-studies in 2002 and 2007. A questionnaire assessed cold-related symptoms (respiratory, cardiac, peripheral circulation). Glycaemic status was determined based on fasting blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance tests or reported diagnosis of diabetes and categorized into normal glucose metabolism, impaired fasting blood glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, screening-detected type 2 diabetes and type 2 diabetes.
RESULTS: Type 2 diabetes was associated with increased odds for cold-related dyspnoea [Adjusted OR 1.72 (95% CI, 1.28-2.30)], chest pain [2.10 (1.32-3.34)] and respiratory symptoms [1.85 (1.44-2.38)] compared with normal glucose metabolism. Screened type 2 diabetes showed increased OR for cold-related dyspnoea [1.36 (1.04-1.77)], cough [1.41 (1.06-1.87)] and cardiac symptoms [1.51 (1.04-2.20)]. Worsening of glycaemic status was associated with increased odds for cold-related dyspnoea (from 1.16 in impaired fasting glucose to 1.72 in type 2 diabetes, P=0.000), cough (1.02-1.27, P=0.032), chest pain (1.28-2.10, P=0.006), arrhythmias (0.87-1.74, P=0.020), cardiac (1.11-1.99, P=0.000), respiratory (1.14-1.84, P=0.000) and all symptoms (1.05-1.66, P=0.003).
CONCLUSIONS: Subjects with diabetes and pre-diabetes experience more cold-related cardiorespiratory symptoms and need instructions for proper protection from cold weather to reduce adverse health effects.
PubMed ID
28521195 View in PubMed
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Effects of whole body cooling on sensory perception and manual performance in subjects with Raynaud's phenomenon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302323
Source
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology. 2001 Apr;128(4):749-57.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
Rissanen S
Hassi J
Juopperi K
Rintamäki H
Source
Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology. Part A, Molecular and Integrative Physiology. 2001 Apr;128(4):749-57.
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Temperature Regulation
Cold Temperature
Fingers
Humans
Male
Perception
Physiology
Raynaud Disease
Physiopathology
Sensation
Skin Physiological Phenomena
Abstract
Patients with Raynaud's phenomenon (RP) have abnormal digital vasoconstriction in response to cold. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of cooling on sensory perception and manual performance in healthy male subjects and subjects with RP. There were two groups of subjects with primary RP: 12 subjects fulfilled the criteria of Lewis (L) and the other 12 the more critical criteria of Maricq (M). Control group (C) consisted of 19 healthy men. Subjects were exposed to 5 degrees C for 60 min. Skin temperatures were measured. Finger dexterity, pinch strength, abduction/adduction of fingers, pressure perception threshold and vibration perception threshold were tested during the exposure every 15 min. At the beginning of the exposure the mean (S.E.) finger temperature was 2.5 (1.2) degrees C (P
PubMed ID
11282318 View in PubMed
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Influence of seasonally adjusted exposure to cold and darkness on cognitive performance in circumpolar residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302326
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2005 Jul;46(3):239-46.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Palinkas LA
Mäkinen TM
Pääkkönen T
Rintamäki H
Leppäluoto J
Hassi J
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2005 Jul;46(3):239-46.
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult Arousal
Physiology
Cognition
Cold Climate
Cold Temperature
Environmental Exposure
Humans
Light
Neuropsychological Tests
Seasons
Abstract
The effects of seasonally adjusted 24-h exposure to cold and darkness on cognitive performance in urban circumpolar residents was assessed in 15 male subjects who spent three 24-h periods in a climatic chamber at 65 degrees latitude during the winter (January-March) and/or summer (August-September). Each subject was exposed to three different environmental conditions in random order: (1) 22 degrees C temperature and 500 lx lighting; (2) 10 degrees C temperature and 500 lx lighting; and (3) 10 degrees C temperature and 0.5-l lx lighting. Accuracy on an addition-subtraction task was significantly greater in the summer than in the winter (p= 0.038), while accuracy on a repeated acquisition task was significantly greater in the winter than in the summer (p
PubMed ID
15842414 View in PubMed
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Plasma levels of endothelin-1 and atrial natriuretic peptide in men during a 2-hour stay in a cold room.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302327
Source
Acta Physiol Scand. 1991 Aug;142(4):481-5.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
Hassi J
Rintamäki H
Ruskoaho H
Leppäluoto J
Vuolteenaho O
Source
Acta Physiol Scand. 1991 Aug;142(4):481-5.
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Atrial Natriuretic Factor
Blood
Body temperature
Cold Temperature
Endothelins
Humans
Male
Radioimmunoassay
Time Factors
Abstract
Male volunteers were exposed to +10 degrees C ambient temperature for 2 hours while they were sitting undressed. The levels of endothelin-1 and atrial natriuretic peptide were determined by radioimmunoassays. Control samples were obtained at thermoneutrality. The cold exposure resulted in lowering of the mean skin temperature (from 31.2 +/- 0.3 degrees C-22.6 +/- 2.5 degrees C, mean +/- SEM), which indicates that a marked vasoconstriction took place, as well as a decrease of the body heat content (by 11.2 +/- 0.7 kJ kg-1). However, plasma endothelin-1 levels did not change significantly during the exposure. Thus circulating endothelin-1 does not seem to be responsible for the vasoconstriction associated with cold air exposure. The plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels exhibited a slight increase towards the end of the cold exposure. This finding is in accord with the notion that atrial natriuretic peptide might contribute to the diuresis frequently observed in the cold.
PubMed ID
1835249 View in PubMed
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Seasonal changes in thermal responses of urban residents to cold exposure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302328
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol. 2004 Oct;139(2):229-38.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Mäkinen TM
Pääkkönen T
Palinkas LA
Rintamäki H
Leppäluoto J
Hassi J
Source
Comp Biochem Physiol A Mol Integr Physiol. 2004 Oct;139(2):229-38.
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Flow Velocity
Cold Temperature
Hot Temperature
Humans
Male
Oxygen consumption
Perception
Seasons
Shivering
Metabolism
Skin temperature
Thermosensing
Time Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
To determine whether urban circumpolar residents show seasonal acclimatisation to cold, thermoregulatory responses and thermal perception during cold exposure were examined in young men during January-March (n=7) and August-September (n=8). Subjects were exposed for 24 h to 22 and to 10 degrees C. Rectal (T(rect)) and skin temperatures were measured throughout the exposure. Oxygen consumption (VO(2)), finger skin blood flow (Q(f)), shivering and cold (CDT) and warm detection thresholds (WDT) were assessed four times during the exposure. Ratings of thermal sensations, comfort and tolerance were recorded using subjective judgement scales at 1-h intervals. During winter, subjects had a significantly higher mean skin temperature at both 22 and 10 degrees C compared with summer. However, skin temperatures decreased more at 10 degrees C in winter and remained higher only in the trunk. Finger skin temperature was higher at 22 degrees C, but lower at 10 degrees C in the winter suggesting an enhanced cold-induced vasoconstriction. Similarly, Q(f) decreased more in winter. The cold detection threshold of the hand was shifted to a lower level in the cold, and more substantially in the winter, which was related to lower skin temperatures in winter. Thermal sensations showed only slight seasonal variation. The observed seasonal differences in thermal responses suggest increased preservation of heat especially in the peripheral areas in winter. Blunted vasomotor and skin temperature responses, which are typical for habituation to cold, were not observed in winter. Instead, the responses in winter resemble aggravated reactions of non-cold acclimatised subjects.
PubMed ID
15528172 View in PubMed
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Sequelae of moderate finger frostbite as assessed by subjective sensations, clinical signs, and thermophysiological responses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293902
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2000 Apr;59(2):137-45.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000

Serum levels of thyroid and adrenal hormones, testosterone, TSH, LH, GH and prolactin in men after a 2-h stay in a cold room.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302329
Source
Acta Physiol Scand. 1988 Apr;132(4):543-8.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1988
Author
Leppäluoto J
Korhonen I
Huttunen P
Hassi J
Source
Acta Physiol Scand. 1988 Apr;132(4):543-8.
Date
1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body temperature
Cold Temperature
Growth Hormone
Blood
Hemodynamics
Humans
Luteinizing Hormone
Male
Pituitary Hormones, Anterior
Prolactin
Testosterone
Thyroid Hormones
Thyrotropin
Time Factors
Abstract
Twenty healthy male volunteers, dressed in shorts, stayed for 30 min in a room with an ambient temperature of 28 degrees C followed by a stay in a room with a temperature of 10 degrees C for 120 min. The mean skin temperature fell rapidly during the first minutes in the cold but the rectal temperature began to fall as late as at 60 min (0.1 degree C) and was 0.4 degrees C lower at the end of the cold exposure than before it. The metabolic rate, and the systolic and diastolic blood pressures, increased, and the pulse rate fell, in the cold. Serum samples were taken before moving to the cold (10 degrees C) room and after the 2-h stay and assayed for 11 hormones. There were no significant changes in the serum concentration of adrenalin, T3, T4, testosterone, TSH or LH. The serum level of noradrenaline increased from 4.5 to 6.3 nmol l-1 (P less than 0.01) and those of cortisol, GH and prolactin fell by 20, 87 and 48% (all P less than 0.01). The total serum proteins increased by 11% and free fatty acids by 28% (P less than 0.01). Our results show that the short-term exposure of adult man to low ambient temperature does not have any effect on the pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-testis axes and adrenal medulla. The increase of noradrenaline is probably due to general activation of the sympathetic nerves at low temperatures. The decreases in the serum levels of GH and prolactin reflect a true decrease in their secretions and may be mediated by inhibitory hypothalamic mechanisms.
PubMed ID
3227893 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.