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Number of teeth and myocardial infarction and stroke among elderly never smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89263
Source
J Negat Results Biomed. 2009;8:6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Syrjälä Anna-Maija H
Ylöstalo Pekka
Hartikainen Sirpa
Sulkava Raimo
Knuuttila Matti L
Author Affiliation
Department of Periodontology, Institute of Dentistry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. Anna-Maija.Syrjala@oulu.fi
Source
J Negat Results Biomed. 2009;8:6
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Demography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Myocardial Infarction - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Stroke - complications - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In most previous studies the association between number of teeth and cardiovascular diseases has been found to be stronger among younger age groups than in older age groups, which indicates that age may modify the association between number of teeth and cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the association between tooth loss and atherosclerotic vascular diseases such as myocardial infarction and stroke in a homogeneous elderly population. The study population was comprised of a subpopulation of 392 community-living elderly people who participated in the population-based Kuopio 75+ study. The data were collected through an interview, a structured clinical health examination and from patient records. The main outcome measures were a history of diagnosed myocardial infarction and diagnosed ischemic stroke. Prevalence proportion ratios (PPR) were estimated using generalised linear models. RESULTS: Edentate subjects had a weakly, statistically non-significantly increased likelihood of a history of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke compared with dentate subjects. Those with a large number of teeth had a slightly, but not statistically significantly increased likelihood of a history of myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke compared with those with a small number of teeth. CONCLUSION: These data did not show evidence that total or partial tooth loss would be associated with atherosclerotic vascular diseases such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke among an elderly population aged 75 years or older.
PubMed ID
19386093 View in PubMed
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What lies behind relief and worsening of asthma symptoms? A register-based study of adults with asthma and other chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80641
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2006 Oct;15(5):278-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2006
Author
Ikäheimo Pekka
Hartikainen Sirpa
Tuuponen Tuili
Hakko Helinä
Kiuttu Jorma
Klaukka Timo
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, FIN 90014, Finland. pekka.ikaheimo@oulu.fi
Source
Prim Care Respir J. 2006 Oct;15(5):278-85
Date
Oct-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Anti-Asthmatic Agents - therapeutic use
Asthma - drug therapy - physiopathology
Comorbidity
Female
Finland
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology - physiopathology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Registries
Severity of Illness Index
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
AIMS: To examine how subjects with relief or worsening of asthma symptoms differ in terms of gender, age, severity and duration of asthma, comorbidity, and difficulties with medication and daily life. METHODS: A postal inquiry among a sample of 6000 adults with clinically diagnosed asthma and/or other chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases. RESULTS: Relief of asthma symptoms over a 12-month period was associated with a recent asthma diagnosis, within five years, in both sexes. Lack of current smoking and lack of problems in using anti-asthmatic treatment were associated with a positive outcome in men, and mild asthma and living alone associated with a positive outcome in women. Severe and moderate asthma predicted worse symptoms in both sexes, as did other obstructive pulmonary diseases, living alone, and medication problems amongst men. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with asthma should be cared for comprehensively, requiring consideration of both clinical and psychosocial factors that can modify the course of the disease.
PubMed ID
16979379 View in PubMed
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