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Airway obstruction and the risk of myocardial infarction and death from coronary heart disease: a national health examination survey with a 33-year follow-up period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297762
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 01; 33(1):89-98
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
Tiina Mattila
Tuula Vasankari
Harri Rissanen
Paul Knekt
Pauli Puukka
Markku Heliövaara
Author Affiliation
Heart and Lung Center, Helsinki University Hospital, Meilahti Triangle Hospital, HUS, 6th Floor, PO Box 372, 00029, Helsinki, Finland. tiina.m.mattila@fimnet.fi.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2018 01; 33(1):89-98
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Airway Obstruction - epidemiology
Cause of Death
Coronary Disease - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Abstract
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been associated with coronary mortality. Yet, data about the association between COPD and acute myocardial infarction (MI) remain scarce. We aimed to study airway obstruction as a predictor of MI and coronary mortality among 5576 Finnish adults who participated in a national health examination survey between 1978 and 1980. Subjects underwent spirometry, had all necessary data, showed no indications of cardiovascular disease at baseline, and were followed up through record linkage with national registers through 2011. The primary outcome consisted of a major coronary event-that is, hospitalization for MI or coronary death, whichever occurred first. We specified obstruction using the lower limit of normal categorization. Through multivariate analysis adjusted for potential confounding factors for coronary heart disease, hazard ratios (HRs) (with the 95% confidence intervals in parentheses) of a major coronary event, MI, and coronary death reached 1.06 (0.79-1.42), 0.84 (0.54-1.31), and 1.40 (1.04-1.88), respectively, in those with obstruction compared to others. However, in women aged 30-49 obstruction appeared to predict a major coronary event, where the adjusted HR reached 4.21 (1.73-10.28). In conclusion, obstruction appears to predict a major coronary event in younger women only, whereas obstruction closely associates with the risk of coronary death independent of sex and age.
PubMed ID
28688065 View in PubMed
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Antibodies to periodontal pathogens and stroke risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179360
Source
Stroke. 2004 Sep;35(9):2020-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Pirkko J Pussinen
Georg Alfthan
Harri Rissanen
Antti Reunanen
Sirkka Asikainen
Paul Knekt
Author Affiliation
Institute of Dentistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 63 (Haartmaninkatu 8), FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. pirkko.pussinen@helsinki.fi
Source
Stroke. 2004 Sep;35(9):2020-3
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans - immunology
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood - immunology
Antibody Specificity
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - epidemiology - immunology
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin A - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Periodontitis - immunology - microbiology
Porphyromonas gingivalis - immunology
Risk
Stroke - epidemiology - immunology
Abstract
The association between cerebrovascular events and periodontitis has been found in few studies based on clinical periodontal examinations. However, evidence on the association between periodontal pathogens and stroke is lacking. Therefore, the aim of the study was to investigate whether elevated levels of serum antibodies to major periodontal pathogens predict stroke in a case-control study.
The study population comprised 6950 subjects (aged 45 to 64 years) who participated in the Mobile Clinic Health Survey in 1973 to 1976 in Finland. During a follow-up of 13 years, a total of 173 subjects had a stroke. From these, 64 subjects had already experienced a stroke or had signs of coronary heart disease (CHD) at baseline, whereas 109 subjects were apparently healthy. Two controls per case were matched for age, gender, municipality, and disease status. Serum IgG and IgA class antibody levels to the periodontal pathogens, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis, were determined by multiserotype enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
The cases identified during the follow-up that were free of stroke or CHD at baseline were more often IgA-seropositive for A. actinomycetemcomitans than were their controls, 41.3% versus 29.3%. Compared with the seronegative, the seropositive subjects had a multivariate odds ratio of 1.6 (95% CI, 1.0 to 2.6) for stroke. The patients with a history of stroke or CHD at baseline were more often IgA-seropositive for P. gingivalis than were their controls, 79.7% versus 70.2%. When compared with the seronegative, the seropositive subjects had an odds ratio of 2.6 (1.0 to 7.0) for secondary stroke.
The present prospective study provides serological evidence that an infection caused by major periodontal pathogens is associated with future stroke.
PubMed ID
15232116 View in PubMed
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Association between all-cause and cause-specific mortality and the GOLD stages 1-4: A 30-year follow-up among Finnish adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272552
Source
Respir Med. 2015 Aug;109(8):1012-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Tiina Mattila
Tuula Vasankari
Merja Kanervisto
Tarja Laitinen
Olli Impivaara
Harri Rissanen
Paul Knekt
Pekka Jousilahti
Seppo Saarelainen
Pauli Puukka
Markku Heliövaara
Source
Respir Med. 2015 Aug;109(8):1012-8
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cause of Death - trends
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Forced expiratory volume
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance - methods
Proportional Hazards Models
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - mortality - physiopathology
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Rate - trends
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Mortality correlates with the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria of airway obstruction. Yet, little data exist concerning the long-term survival of patients presenting with different levels of obstruction.
We studied the association between all-cause and cause-specific mortality and GOLD stages 1-4 in a 30-year follow-up among 6636 Finnish men and women aged 30 or older participating in the Mini-Finland Health Study between 1978 and 1980.
After adjusting for age, sex, and smoking history, the GOLD stage of the subject showed a strong direct relationship with all-cause mortality, mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory diseases, and cancer. The adjusted hazard ratios of death were 1.27 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06-1.51), 1.40 (1.21-1.63), 1.55 (1.21-1.97) and 2.85 (1.65-4.94) for GOLD stages 1-4, respectively, with FEV1/FVC =70% as the reference. The association between GOLD stages 2-4 and mortality was strongest among subjects under 50 years of age at the baseline measurement. Cardiovascular mortality increased consistently for all GOLD stages.
Airway obstruction indicates an increased risk for all-cause mortality according to the severity of the GOLD stage. We found that even stage 1 carries a risk for cardiovascular death independently of smoking history and other known risk factors.
PubMed ID
26108990 View in PubMed
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Cohort Profile: The Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Surveys FMC, FMCF and MFS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296694
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2017 12 01; 46(6):1760-1761i
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-01-2017

Dietary carbohydrate quantity and quality in relation to obesity: A pooled analysis of three Finnish population-based studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283089
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 Jun;44(4):385-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2016
Author
Niina E Kaartinen
Paul Knekt
Noora Kanerva
Liisa M Valsta
Johan G Eriksson
Harri Rissanen
Tuija Jääskeläinen
Satu Männistö
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2016 Jun;44(4):385-93
Date
Jun-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - adverse effects - standards
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glycemic Index
Glycemic Load
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Abstract
The relationship between carbohydrate intake, dietary glycaemic index (GI) and load (GL), and obesity remains unsolved. Sugar intake and obesity represent a timely topic, but studies on sugar subcategories are scarce. We aimed to study whether total carbohydrate, sucrose, lactose, fibre, dietary GI, and GL are associated with obesity in 25-79-year-old Finns.
Our pooled analysis included three cross-sectional population-based studies: the DILGOM Study (n = 4842), the Helsinki Birth Cohort Study (n =1979), and the Health 2000 Survey (n = 5521). Diet was assessed by a validated food-frequency questionnaire, and anthropometric measurements were collected by standardised protocols. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using logistic regression analysis.
In the model, which included sex, age, education, smoking, physical activity, and energy intake, the likelihood of being obese (body mass index ? 30 kg/m(2)) appeared lower in the highest quartiles of total carbohydrate (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.57-0.74; P for trend
PubMed ID
26787554 View in PubMed
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Fat free mass and obesity in relation to educational level.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146941
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:448
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Elina Seppänen-Nuijten
Marjaana Lahti-Koski
Satu Männistö
Paul Knekt
Harri Rissanen
Arpo Aromaa
Markku Heliövaara
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Mannerheimintie 166, 00300 Helsinki, Finland. elina.seppanen-nuijten@elisanet.fi
Source
BMC Public Health. 2009;9:448
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue
Adiposity - physiology
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Body Composition
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to describe the body composition of Finnish adults, especially by education, and to investigate whether fat-free mass (FFM) can explain educational gradients relating to body mass index (BMI) and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR).
Data for this cross-sectional study were based on data collected in 2000-2001 for the Health 2000 Survey. Of the nationally representative sample of 8,028 Finnish men and women aged 30 years and older, 6,300 (78.5%) were included in the study. Body composition measurements were carried out in the health examination, where FFM was assessed with eight-polar bioelectrical impedance analysis. Questions on education were included in the health interview.
The mean FFM varied by education in older (>or= 65 y.) men only. In the middle-aged group (30-64 y.), highly educated men were less likely to belong to the lowest quintile of FFM (OR 0.67, 95%CI 0.48-0.93) compared with the least educated subjects. The level of education was inversely associated with the prevalence of high BMI and WHR in middle-aged men. In women, the respective associations were found both in middle-aged women and their older counterparts. Adjustment for FFM slightly strengthened the associations of education with BMI and WHR.
The association between education and FFM is weak. Educational gradients of high BMI and high WHR cannot be explained by FFM.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19961589 View in PubMed
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Helicobacter pylori IgA and IgG antibodies, serum pepsinogen I and the risk of gastric cancer: changes in the risk with extended follow-up period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170572
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Aug 1;119(3):702-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1-2006
Author
Paul Knekt
Lyly Teppo
Arpo Aromaa
Harri Rissanen
Timo U Kosunen
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. Paul.Knekt@ktl.fi
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 Aug 1;119(3):702-5
Date
Aug-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Helicobacter Infections - complications - microbiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood
Immunoglobulin G - blood
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Pepsinogen A - blood
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Stomach Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
The prediction of Helicobacter pylori antibodies immunoglobulin A (IgA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) and serum pepsinogen I (PG I) on gastric cancer occurrence was studied in a nested case-control study, based on 225 incident cancer cases and 435 matched controls from a Finnish cohort followed from 1966-1991. The odds ratio of noncardia gastric cancer between infected and noninfected persons was 3.12 (95% confidence interval (CI)=1.97-4.95) for elevated IgA and 2.88 (CI: 1.63-5.07) for elevated IgG antibodies. The odds ratio between low and high PG I was 2.24 (CI: 1.43-3.49). The strength of association was significant for IgA antibodies during the total follow-up, but for IgG antibodies this was only true for follow-up periods of 15 years or more. IgA antibodies were significantly associated with all registered histological subtypes apart from intestinal type adenocarcinoma. The highest gastric cancer risk was found among individuals with simultaneously elevated IgA and IgG antibodies and low PG I with an odds ratio of 10.9 (CI: 4.31-27.7) in comparison with those who were negative for both antibodies and had normal PG I. Elevated IgA and IgG antibodies and low PG I were not associated with cancers of the gastric cardia. The findings support the hypothesis that H. pylori infection is a cause of noncardia gastric cancer. Although elevated H. pylori IgA and IgG antibodies and low PG I independently could predict the occurrence of noncardia gastric cancer, their power to do so varied with the stage and length of the follow-up period and it increased when they were applied in combination.
PubMed ID
16496404 View in PubMed
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Intake of fish and long-chain n-3 fatty acids and the risk of coronary heart mortality in men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170006
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Apr;95(4):824-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Ritva Järvinen
Paul Knekt
Harri Rissanen
Antti Reunanen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, PL 1627, 70211 Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2006 Apr;95(4):824-9
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Coronary Disease - mortality - prevention & control
Energy intake
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Fishes
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Seafood
Sex Factors
Abstract
This prospective study investigated the relationship between the consumption of fish and intake of long-chain n-3 fatty acids and the risk of coronary heart mortality in 2775 men and 2445 women aged from 30 to 79 years who were free of CHD and had participated in a health examination survey from 1967 to 1972. In total, 335 men and 163 women died of CHD during a follow-up until the end of 1992. A dietary history interview method provided data on habitual consumption of fish and other foods over the preceding year at baseline. The intakes of long-chain n-3 fatty acids were calculated on the basis of food composition values of Finnish foods. Higher consumption of fish was associated with a decreased risk of CHD among women, whereas no significant association was seen among men. The relative risk between the highest and the lowest quintile for fish consumption was 1.00 (95 % CI 0.70, 1.43; P for trend 0.83) for men and 0.59 (95 % CI 0.36, 0.99; P for trend 0.02) for women in analysis adjusting for age, energy intake, geographical area, BMI, serum cholesterol, blood pressure, smoking, occupation and diabetes; however, after adjustment for dietary confounders this association was no longer significant. The intake of n-3 fatty acids was not significantly associated with the risk of CHD in either men or women. In conclusion, our results for women are in line with the suggested protective effect of fish consumption against CHD but a similar association was not, however, found in men.
PubMed ID
16571163 View in PubMed
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Mortality in the presence of a vertebral fracture, scoliosis, or Scheuermann's disease in the thoracic spine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155972
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Aug;18(8):595-601
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Ville Puisto
Harri Rissanen
Markku Heliövaara
Paul Knekt
Ilkka Helenius
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute and the Hospital for Children and Adolescents, Helsinki, Finland. ville.puisto@helsinki.fi
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 2008 Aug;18(8):595-601
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Radiography, Thoracic
Respiratory Tract Diseases - mortality
Scheuermann Disease - mortality - radiography
Scoliosis - mortality - radiography
Sex Distribution
Spinal Fractures - mortality - radiography
Abstract
Vertebral fractures and scoliosis, unlike Scheuermann's disease, have been associated with increased mortality. Total and cause-specific mortalities of these spinal deformities were studied to produce epidemiologic knowledge.
A population of 16,010 Finnish men and women 20 to 92 years of age participated in a health examination from 1973-1976. Their spinal deformities were assessed from chest radiographs by two radiologists. Logistic regression and Cox's model were used to estimate risk ratios and to control confounding. The follow-up period was 30 years.
Vertebral fracture significantly predicted total mortality, and this increase in mortality was due to an excess of cancer and respiratory deaths. The increased risk of cancer death persisted even when those subjects with a history of cancer and the first 5 years of follow-up were excluded to avoid the effect of metastatic fractures, and when confounding was controlled. In this analysis the relative risk of cancer death in subjects with a baseline vertebral fracture was 2.02 (95% confidence interval: 1.23-3.31).
Vertebral fracture significantly predicted increased mortality from cancer. To clarify the mechanism, the fractures should be studied further for their associations with defined and site-specific cancer types.
PubMed ID
18652976 View in PubMed
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Overall cardiovascular prognosis of isolated systolic hypertension, isolated diastolic hypertension and pulse pressure defined with home measurements: the Finn-home study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256835
Source
J Hypertens. 2014 Mar;32(3):518-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Teemu J Niiranen
Harri Rissanen
Jouni K Johansson
Antti M Jula
Author Affiliation
aPopulation Studies Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Turku bPopulation Health Research Unit, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
J Hypertens. 2014 Mar;32(3):518-24
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - complications - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Abstract
The overall cardiovascular prognosis of isolated systolic hypertension, isolated diastolic hypertension and pulse pressure defined with home blood pressure (BP) measurements remains unclear.
A prospective nationwide study was initiated in 2000-2001 on 1924 randomly selected participants aged 44-74 years. We determined home and office BP at baseline and classified the individuals into four groups according to their home BP levels: normotension, isolated diastolic hypertension, isolated systolic hypertension and systolic-diastolic hypertension. The primary endpoint was incidence of a composite cardiovascular event.
After a median follow-up of 11.2 years, 236 individuals had suffered a cardiovascular event. In multivariable Cox proportional hazard models, the relative hazards and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for cardiovascular events were significantly higher in participants with isolated diastolic hypertension (relative hazard 1.95; 95% CI, 1.06-3.57; P=0.03), isolated systolic hypertension (relative hazard 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42-3.05; P
PubMed ID
24477096 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.