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Assessing probabilistic modelling for wind speed from numerical weather prediction model and observation in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311318
Source
Sci Rep. 2021 Apr 07; 11(1):7613
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-07-2021
Author
Hao Chen
Yngve Birkelund
Stian Normann Anfinsen
Reidar Staupe-Delgado
Fuqing Yuan
Author Affiliation
Department of Technology and Safety, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, 9019, Tromsø, Norway. hao.chen@uit.no.
Source
Sci Rep. 2021 Apr 07; 11(1):7613
Date
Apr-07-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Mapping Arctic renewable energy resources, particularly wind, is important to ensure the transition into renewable energy in this environmentally vulnerable region. The statistical characterisation of wind is critical for effectively assessing energy potential and planning wind park sites and is, therefore, an important input for wind power policymaking. In this article, different probability density functions are used to model wind speed for five wind parks in the Norwegian Arctic region. A comparison between wind speed data from numerical weather prediction models and measurements is made, and a probability analysis for the wind speed interval corresponding to the rated power, which is largely absent in the existing literature, is presented. The results of the present study suggest that no single probability function outperforms across all scenarios. However, some differences emerged from the models when applied to different wind parks. The Nakagami and Generalised extreme value distributions were chosen for the numerical weather predicted prediction and the observed wind speed modelling, respectively, due to their superiority and stability compared with other methods. This paper, therefore, provides a novel direction for understanding the numerical weather prediction wind model and shows that its speed statistical features are better captured than those of real wind.
PubMed ID
33828197 View in PubMed
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Complete genome sequence of an Arctic Ocean bacterium Shewanella sp. Arc9-LZ with capacity of synthesizing silver nanoparticles in darkness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305094
Source
Mar Genomics. 2021 Apr; 56:100808
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2021
Author
Shuang Li
Yuanyuan Niu
Hao Chen
Peiqing He
Author Affiliation
Key Laboratory of Science and Technology for Marine Ecology and Environment, First Institute of Oceanography, Ministry of Natural Resources, 6 Xianxialing Road, Qingdao 266061, China; Key Laboratory of Natural Products of Qingdao, Qingdao 266061, China.
Source
Mar Genomics. 2021 Apr; 56:100808
Date
Apr-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Shewanella sp. Arc9-LZ is a bacterium capable of synthesizing silver nanoparticles in darkness. It was isolated from the marine sediment from the Arctic Ocean (158°01'12"W; 84°28'38"N) collected during the 9th Chinese National Arctic Expedition in 2018. Here, we describe the complete genome of Shewanella sp. Arc9-LZ. The complete genome of Shewanella sp. Arc9-LZ is composed of a circular chromosome of 4,911,031 bp with G + C content of 41.61 mol%. The genome encodes 4040 protein-coding genes (CDSs), 104 tRNAs, and 35 rRNAs. The rRNAs contain 14 copies of 5S rRNA gene, 11 copies of 16S rRNA gene, and 10 copies of 23S rRNA gene. Based on the KEGG, COG, NR, Swiss-Prot, TCDB, and CAZy analysis, a total of 64 genes belonging to 9 kinds are related to the AgNPs synthesis. These genes are involeved in the synthesis of riboflavin, b-type cytochrome, c-type cytochrome, coenzyme Q, NADPH dehydrogenase, cytochrome c reductase, cytochrome c oxidase, nitroreductase, and nitrate reductase.
PubMed ID
32778401 View in PubMed
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Dataset regarding the mechanical characterization of sedimentary rocks derived from Svalbard for possible use in local road constructions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303684
Source
Data Brief. 2021 Feb; 34:106735
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2021
Author
Diego Maria Barbieri
Jean-Gabriel Dorval
Baowen Lou
Hao Chen
Benan Shu
Fusong Wang
Inge Hoff
Author Affiliation
Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Høgskoleringen 7A, Trondheim, 7491 Trøndelag, Norway.
Source
Data Brief. 2021 Feb; 34:106735
Date
Feb-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The dataset deals with the mechanical characterization of sedimentary rocks collected along the banks of Longyear river in proximity of Longyearbyen (Svalbard) at the junction of Bolterdalen and Adventdalen valleys. As the rocks represent possible local construction materials that can be employed in the new road infrastructures located in the Svalbard archipelago, three types of laboratory investigations were performed for mechanical characterization: Los Angeles tests, micro-Deval tests and repeated load triaxial tests. The grading curve of the material characterized with the repeated load triaxial tests corresponded to a typical one commonly adopted in Norway for road base layer (0-31.5?mm). The dataset offers a thorough overview of the mechanical properties relevant for road constructions and the dataset can be useful to both contractors and transportation agencies operating in the Svalbard archipelago.
PubMed ID
33506082 View in PubMed
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Genetic basis of eugonadal and hypogonadal female reproductive disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283152
Source
Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2017 May 09;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-09-2017
Author
Tatiana Trofimova
Daria Lizneva
Larisa Suturina
Walidah Walker
Yen-Hao Chen
Ricardo Azziz
Lawrence C Layman
Source
Best Pract Res Clin Obstet Gynaecol. 2017 May 09;
Date
May-09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This review discusses the current state of our understanding regarding the genetic basis of the most important reproductive disorders in women. For clarity, these disorders have been divided into eugonadal and hypogonadal types. Hypogonadal disorders have been further subdivided according to serum gonadotropin levels. Our review focuses on historical and recent data regarding the genetics of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis dysfunction, as well as the development and etiology of eugonadal disorders including leiomyomata, endometriosis, spontaneous ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, polycystic ovarian syndrome, mullerian aplasia, and steroid hormone resistance syndromes. We discuss the known genes most commonly involved in hypergonadotropic hypogonadism (Turner syndrome and premature ovarian failure) and hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism (Kallmann syndrome and normosmic types). In addition, we summarize the current clinical testing approaches and their utility in practical application.
PubMed ID
28576390 View in PubMed
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How do macro-level contexts and policies affect the employment chances of chronically ill and disabled people? Part II: The impact of active and passive labor market policies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132184
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2011;41(3):415-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Paula Holland
Lotta Nylén
Karsten Thielen
Kjetil A van der Wel
Wen-Hao Chen
Ben Barr
Bo Burström
Finn Diderichsen
Per Kragh Andersen
Espen Dahl
Sharanjit Uppal
Stephen Clayton
Margaret Whitehead
Author Affiliation
Division of Health Research, Lancaster University, England.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2011;41(3):415-30
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Chronic Disease
Disabled Persons
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data - trends
Europe
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Organizational Culture
Organizational Policy
Public Policy
Regression Analysis
Social Justice
Social Welfare
Abstract
The authors investigate three hypotheses on the influence of labor market deregulation, decommodification, and investment in active labor market policies on the employment of chronically ill and disabled people. The study explores the interaction between employment, chronic illness, and educational level for men and women in Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, countries with advanced social welfare systems and universal health care but with varying types of active and passive labor market policies. People with chronic illness were found to fare better in employment terms in the Nordic countries than in Canada or the United Kingdom. Their employment chances also varied by educational level and country. The employment impact of having both chronic illness and low education was not just additive but synergistic. This amplification was strongest for British men and women, Norwegian men, and Danish women. Hypotheses on the disincentive effects of tighter employment regulation or more generous welfare benefits were not supported. The hypothesis that greater investments in active labor market policies may improve the employment of chronically ill people was partially supported. Attention must be paid to the differential impact of macro-level policies on the labor market participation of chronically ill and disabled people with low education, a group facing multiple barriers to gaining employment.
PubMed ID
21842571 View in PubMed
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How do macro-level contexts and policies affect the employment chances of chronically ill and disabled people? Part I: The impact of recession and deindustrialization.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132185
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2011;41(3):395-413
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Paula Holland
Bo Burström
Margaret Whitehead
Finn Diderichsen
Espen Dahl
Ben Barr
Lotta Nylén
Wen-Hao Chen
Karsten Thielen
Kjetil A van der Wel
Stephen Clayton
Sharanjit Uppal
Author Affiliation
Division of Health Research, Lancaster University, England.
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2011;41(3):395-413
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Chronic Disease - economics
Disabled Persons
Economic Recession
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data - trends
Europe
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Social Change
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data - trends
Abstract
Low employment rates of chronically ill and disabled people are of serious concern. Being out of work increases the risk of poverty and social exclusion, which may further damage the health of these groups, exacerbating health inequalities. Macro-level policies have a potentially tremendous impact on their employment chances, and these influences urgently need to be understood as the current economic crisis intensifies. In Part I of this two-part study, the authors examine employment trends for people who report a chronic illness or disability, by gender and educational level, in Canada, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and the United Kingdom in the context of economic booms and busts and deindustrialization. People with the double burden of chronic illness and low education have become increasingly marginalized from the labor market. Deindustrialization may have played a part in this process. In addition, periods of high unemployment have sparked a downward trend in employment for already marginalized groups who did not feel the benefits when the economy improved. Norway and Sweden have been better able to protect the employment of these groups than the United Kingdom and Canada. These contextual differences suggest that other macro-level factors, such as active and passive labor market polices, may be important, as examined in part II.
PubMed ID
21842570 View in PubMed
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The impact of longstanding illness and common mental disorder on competing employment exits routes in older working age: A longitudinal data-linkage study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306811
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(2):e0229221
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2020
Author
Lisa Harber-Aschan
Wen-Hao Chen
Ashley McAllister
Natasja Koitzsch Jensen
Karsten Thielen
Ingelise Andersen
Finn Diderichsen
Ben Barr
Bo Burström
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health, Equity and Health Policy Research Group, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(2):e0229221
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Disabled Persons
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Unemployment - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Comorbidity is prevalent in older working ages and might affect employment exits. This study aimed to 1) assess the associations between comorbidity and different employment exit routes, and 2) examine such associations by gender.
We used data from employed adults aged 50-62 in the Stockholm Public Health Survey 2002 and 2006, linked to longitudinal administrative income records (N = 10,416). The morbidity measure combined Limiting Longstanding Illness and Common Mental Disorder-captured by the General Health Questionnaire-12 (=4)-into a categorical variable: 1) No Limiting Longstanding Illness, no Common Mental Disorder, 2) Limiting Longstanding Illness only, 3) Common Mental Disorder only, and 4) comorbid Limiting Longstanding Illness+Common Mental Disorder. Employment status was followed up until 2010, treating early retirement, disability pension and unemployment as employment exits. Competing risk regression analysed the associations between morbidity and employment exit routes, stratifying by gender.
Compared to No Limiting Longstanding Illness, no Common Mental Disorder, comorbid Limiting Longstanding Illness+Common Mental Disorder was associated with early retirement in men (subdistribution hazard ratio = 1.73, 95% confidence intervals: 1.08-2.76), but not in women. For men and women, strong associations for disability pension were observed with Limiting Longstanding Illness only (subdistribution hazard ratio = 11.43, 95% confidence intervals: 9.40-13.89) and Limiting Longstanding Illness+Common Mental Disorder (subdistribution hazard ratio = 14.25, 95% confidence intervals: 10.91-18.61), and to a lesser extent Common Mental Disorder only (subdistribution hazard ratio = 2.00, 95% confidence intervals: 1.31-3.05). Women were more likely to exit through disability pension than men (subdistribution hazard ratio = 1.96, 95% confidence intervals: 1.60-2.39). Common Mental Disorder only was the only morbidity category associated with unemployment (subdistribution hazard ratio = 1.70, 95% confidence intervals: 1.36-2.15).
Strong associations were observed between specific morbidity categories with different employment exit routes, which differed by gender. Initiatives to extend working lives should consider older workers' varied health needs to prevent inequalities in older age.
PubMed ID
32097437 View in PubMed
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Inequalities in extending working lives beyond age 60 in Canada, Denmark, Sweden and England-By gender, level of education and health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304993
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(8):e0234900
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2020
Author
Ashley McAllister
Theo Bodin
Henrik Brønnum-Hansen
Lisa Harber-Aschan
Ben Barr
Lee Bentley
Qing Liao
Natasja Koitzsch Jensen
Ingelise Andersen
Wen-Hao Chen
Karsten Thielen
Cameron Mustard
Finn Diderichsen
Margaret Whitehead
Bo Burström
Author Affiliation
Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(8):e0234900
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aging
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Educational Status
Employment - statistics & numerical data
England
Female
Health status
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Occupations - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Abstract
Keeping older workers in employment is critical for societies facing the challenge of an ageing population. This study examined the association between types of health conditions and differentials in the probability of employment by level of education among men and women between 60-69 years of age in Canada, Denmark, Sweden and England.
Data were drawn from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe and English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. We combined country data, applied logistic regression, adjusted for educational level, and stratified the analysis by sex to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of employment (>15 hours work per week) for persons with physical health conditions, mental health conditions (depression) and physical-mental health comorbidity.
The odds of employment among men and women with physical-mental health comorbidity were lower compared to those with no/other conditions (men: OR 0.32, 95% CI: 0.25-0.42, women: OR 0.38 95% CI: 0.30-0.48). Women with low education had lower odds of employment compared to their counterparts with high education (OR 0.66, 95% CI: 0.57-0.76). The odds of employment at older ages was lower in Canada, Denmark and England compared with Sweden (e.g. English men: OR 0.48 95% CI 0.40-0.58; English women OR 0.33 95% CI 0.27-0.41).
The odds of employment beyond age 60 is lower for groups with low education, particularly women, and those with physical-mental health co-morbidities. As such, policies to extend working lives should not be 'one size fits all' but instead consider subgroups, in particular, these groups that we have shown to be most vulnerable on the labour market.
PubMed ID
32804945 View in PubMed
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8 records – page 1 of 1.