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An audit of short- and long-term outcomes after laparoscopic removal of common bile duct stones in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264085
Source
Surg Endosc. 2014 Dec;28(12):3451-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
Anne Mattila
Jussi Luhtala
Johanna Mrena
Hannu Kautiainen
Ilmo Kellokumpu
Source
Surg Endosc. 2014 Dec;28(12):3451-7
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde - methods
Cholecystectomy, Laparoscopic - methods
Clinical Audit
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Gallstones - diagnosis - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
To audit short- and long-term outcomes after laparoscopic common bile duct exploration (LCBDE) and factors influencing the success of the laparoscopic treatment.
From January 1999 to December 2011, 288 patients (93 males) underwent a single-stage laparoscopic cholecystectomy combined with LCBDE in two Finnish Hospitals. Short-term outcome data were collected prospectively. Long-term outcomes were examined retrospectively. The main measures of outcome were the success of laparoscopic CBD stone clearance and recurrence of CBD stones in the long-term, with 30-day mortality, morbidity, and the length of postoperative hospital stay as secondary outcome measures.
CBD stones were successfully removed by one-stage laparoscopic procedure in 232 of the 279 patients (83.2%) with verified CBD stones and after conversion to open surgery in additional 28 patients (93.2%). Nineteen patients (6.8%) having residual stones after surgery were successfully treated with postoperative ERCP. On multivariate analysis, the independent factors associated with a failed laparoscopic stone clearance were stone size over 7 mm [OR 3.51 (95% CI 1.53-8.03), p = 0.003], difficult anatomy [OR 18.01 (5.03-64.49), p
PubMed ID
24939161 View in PubMed
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Ankle-brachial index and health-related quality of life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132258
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Oct;19(5):901-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Päivi E Korhonen
Tellervo Seppälä
Hannu Kautiainen
Salme Järvenpää
Pertti T Aarnio
Sirkka-Liisa Kivelä
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Turku, Finland. paivi.e.korhonen@fimnet.fi
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Oct;19(5):901-7
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ankle Brachial Index
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Peripheral Arterial Disease - epidemiology - psychology - ultrasonography
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Walking - physiology
Abstract
Data from population studies using ankle-brachial index (ABI) measurement to screen patients for peripheral arterial disease (PAD) demonstrate that most patients with PAD have no symptoms or atypical symptoms besides classical intermittent claudication. We aimed at comparing health-related quality of life and ABI in a cohort of cardiovascular risk persons in a general population.
SF-36 questionnaire was completed and ABI measured from 915 individuals aged 45-70 years with hypertension, metabolic syndrome, pre-diabetes, newly detected diabetes, body mass index = 30 kg/m(2), or a 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) system. None of the subjects had symptoms of intermittent claudication.
The prevalence of PAD (defined as ABI = 0.90) and borderline PAD (defined as ABI 0.91-1.00) were 5% (95% CI 4-7%) and 20% (95% CI 18-23%), respectively. Patients with PAD had significantly lower quality of life dimension scores for physical functioning, role-physical, general health, and vitality than subjects with normal ABI. Among those with borderline PAD, quality of life was reduced on the general health perception compared to subjects with normal ABI.
Health-related quality of life of individuals with asymptomatic or atypical PAD or borderline PAD is worse than that of individuals with normal ABI. The level of ABI is independently related to physical functioning.
PubMed ID
21835871 View in PubMed
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Ankle-brachial index is lower in hypertensive than in normotensive individuals in a cardiovascular risk population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149797
Source
J Hypertens. 2009 Oct;27(10):2036-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Päivi E Korhonen
Kari T Syvänen
Risto K Vesalainen
Ilkka M Kantola
Hannu Kautiainen
Salme Järvenpää
Pertti T Aarnio
Author Affiliation
Central Satakunta Health Federation of Municipalities, Harjavalta, Finland. paivi.e.korhonen@fimnet.fi
Source
J Hypertens. 2009 Oct;27(10):2036-43
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ankle Brachial Index
Blood pressure
Comorbidity
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Peripheral Vascular Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
Hypertension is an established risk factor for peripheral arterial disease (PAD), but the prevalence of this condition in hypertensive patients without comorbidities is unknown.
In this study, we assess the prevalence and factors associated with PAD, and the usefulness of ankle-brachial index (ABI) in evaluating cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients without cardiovascular or renal disease or previously known diabetes mellitus. We measured ABI in 972 nonclaudicant patients with hypertension, newly diagnosed glucose disorders, metabolic syndrome, obesity or a 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease death of 5% or more according to the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation System.
The prevalence of PAD (defined as ABI
PubMed ID
19587608 View in PubMed
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Anticholinergic drug use and its association with self-reported symptoms among older persons with and without diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298928
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2019
Author
Niina-Mari Inkeri
Merja Karjalainen
Maija Haanpää
Hannu Kautiainen
Juha Saltevo
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Miia Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
School of Pharmacy, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Clin Pharm Ther. 2019 Apr; 44(2):229-235
Date
Apr-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Finland
Humans
Independent living
Male
Practice Patterns, Physicians' - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Anticholinergic drug use has been associated with a risk of central and peripheral adverse effects. There is a lack of information on anticholinergic drug use in persons with diabetes. The aim of this study is to investigate anticholinergic drug use and the association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes.
The basic population was comprised of Finnish community-dwelling primary care patients aged 65 and older. Persons with diabetes were identified according to the ICD-10 diagnostic codes from electronic patient records. Two controls adjusted by age and gender were selected for each person with diabetes. This cross-sectional study was based on electronic primary care patient records and a structured health questionnaire. The health questionnaire was returned by 430 (81.6%) persons with diabetes and 654 (73.5%) persons without diabetes. Data on prescribed drugs were obtained from the electronic patient records. Anticholinergic drug use was measured according to the Anticholinergic Risk Scale. The presence and strength of anticholinergic symptoms were asked in the health questionnaire.
The prevalence of anticholinergic drug use was 8.9% in the total study cohort. There were no significant differences in anticholinergic drug use between persons with and without diabetes. There was no consistent association between anticholinergic drug use and self-reported symptoms.
There is no difference in anticholinergic drug use in older community-dwelling persons with and without diabetes. Anticholinergic drug use should be considered individually and monitored carefully.
PubMed ID
30315583 View in PubMed
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Assessment of cardiovascular risk in primary health care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123961
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Jun;30(2):101-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Päivi Korhonen
Risto Vesalainen
Pertti Aarnio
Hannu Kautiainen
Salme Järvenpää
Ilkka Kantola
Author Affiliation
Central Satakunta Health Federation of Municipalities, Harjavalta, Finland. paivi.e.korhonen@fi mnet.fi
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2012 Jun;30(2):101-6
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Ankle - blood supply
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Brachial Artery - physiopathology
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Creatinine - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Glomerular Filtration Rate
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Abstract
This study aimed at investigating whether cardiovascular risk factors and their impact on total risk estimation differ between men and women.
Cross-sectional cohort study.
Finnish cardiovascular risk subjects (n = 904) without established cardiovascular disease, renal disease, or known diabetes.
Ankle-brachial index (ABI), estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), oral glucose tolerance test, and total cardiovascular risk using SCORE risk charts.
According to the SCORE risk charts, 27.0% (95% CI 23.1-31.2) of the women and 63.1% (95% CI 58.3-67.7) of the men (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
22643155 View in PubMed
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Association between suicidal behaviour and impaired glucose metabolism in depressive disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269531
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2015;15:163
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Hannu Koponen
Hannu Kautiainen
Esa Leppänen
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Mauno Vanhala
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2015;15:163
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Depressive Disorder, Major - drug therapy - psychology
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
Finland
Humans
Insulin Resistance - physiology
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - psychology
Middle Aged
Personality Inventory
Suicidal ideation
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Disturbances in lipid metabolism have been linked to suicidal behaviour, but little is known about the association between suicide risk and abnormal glucose metabolism in depression. Hyperglycaemia and hyperinsulinaemia may increase the risk of depression and also the risk for suicide, we therefore studied associations between suicidal behaviour and disturbances in glucose metabolism in depressive patients who had been referred to depression nurse case managers.
Patients aged 35 years and older (N = 448, mean age 51 years) who were experiencing a new depressive episode, who were referred to depression nurse case managers in 2008-2009 and who scored =10 on the Beck Depression Inventory were enrolled in this study. The study was conducted in municipalities within the Central Finland Hospital District (catchment area of 274 000 inhabitants) as part of the Finnish Depression and Metabolic Syndrome in Adults study. The patients' psychiatric diagnoses and suicidal behaviour were confirmed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Blood samples, for glucose and lipid determinations, were drawn from participants after 12 h of fasting, which was followed by a 2-hour oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) when blood was drawn at 0 and 2 h. Insulin resistance was measured by the Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI) method.
Suicidal ideation (49 %) and previous suicide attempts (16 %) were common in patients with major depressive disorder or dysthymia. Patients with depression and suicidal behaviour had higher blood glucose concentrations at baseline and at 2 hours in the OGTT. Glucose levels associated positively with the prevalence of suicidal behaviour, and the linearity was significant at baseline (p for linearity: 0.012, adjusted for age and sex) and for 2-hour OGTT glucose (p for linearity: 0.004, adjusted for age and sex). QUICKI levels associated with suicidal behavior (p for linearity across tertiles of QUICKI: 0.026). Total and LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels were also higher in those patients with suicidal behaviour. Multivariate analysis revealed that blood glucose levels, BDI scores and antidepressive medications associated with suicidal behaviour.
Insulin resistance and disturbances in glucose and lipid metabolism may be more common in middle-aged depressive patients with suicidal behaviour.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26199013 View in PubMed
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Association between vitamin b12 levels and melancholic depressive symptoms: a Finnish population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259549
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:145
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Jussi Seppälä
Hannu Koponen
Hannu Kautiainen
Johan G Eriksson
Olli Kampman
Jaana Leiviskä
Satu Männistö
Pekka Mäntyselkä
Heikki Oksa
Yrjö Ovaskainen
Merja Viikki
Mauno Vanhala
Source
BMC Psychiatry. 2013;13:145
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Depression - blood
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Vitamin B 12 - blood
Abstract
An association between vitamin B12 levels and depressive symptoms (DS) has been reported in several epidemiological studies. The purpose of this study was to evaluate vitamin B12 levels in population-based samples with melancholic or non-melancholic DS as the relationship between vitamin B12 levels and different subtypes of DS has not been evaluated in previous studies.
Subjects without previously known type 2 diabetes, aged 45-74 years were randomly selected from the National Population Register as a part of the Finnish diabetes prevention programme (FIN-D2D). The study population (N?=?2806, participation rate 62%) consisted of 1328 men and 1478 women. The health examinations were carried out between October and December 2007 according to the WHO MONICA protocol. The assessment of DS was based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, cut-off =10 points). A DSM-IV- criteria based summary score of melancholic items in the BDI was used in dividing the participants with DS (N?=?429) into melancholic (N?=?138) and non-melancholic DS (N?=?291) subgroups. In the statistical analysis we used chi-squared test, t-test, permutation test, analysis of covariance, multivariate logistic regression analysis and multinomial regression model.
The mean vitamin B12 level was 331±176 pmol/L in those without DS while the subjects with non-melancholic DS had a mean vitamin B12 level of 324 ± 135 pmol/L, and those with melancholic DS had the lowest mean vitamin B12 level of 292±112 pmol/L (p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
23705786 View in PubMed
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Association of anticholinergic drugs with hospitalization and mortality among older cardiovascular patients: A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137518
Source
Drugs Aging. 2011 Feb 1;28(2):131-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2011
Author
Juho Uusvaara
Kaisu H Pitkala
Hannu Kautiainen
Reijo S Tilvis
Timo E Strandberg
Author Affiliation
Helsinki University Hospital, Finland. juho.uusvaara@kauniala.fi
Source
Drugs Aging. 2011 Feb 1;28(2):131-8
Date
Feb-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - drug therapy - mortality - therapy
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cognition Disorders - chemically induced
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Inappropriate Prescribing
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
Many potentially inappropriate drugs prescribed to older people have anticholinergic properties as adverse effects and are therefore potentially harmful. These effects typically include constipation, dry mouth, blurred vision, dizziness and slowing of urination. It has been shown that drugs with anticholinergic properties (DAPs) are associated with cognitive decline and dementia, may contribute to events such as falls, delirium and impulsive behaviour, are associated with self-reported adverse effects and physical impairment, and may even be associated with mortality. However, studies of the prognostic implications of DAPs remain scarce.
To evaluate the impact of DAPs on hospitalization and mortality in older patients with stable cardiovascular disease (CVD).
This was a prospective study with a mean follow-up of 3.3 years involving two study groups: users (n?=?295) and non-users (n?=?105) of DAPs. The participants were 400 community-dwelling older people (aged 75-90 years) with stable CVD participating in a secondary prevention study of CVD (DEBATE) in Helsinki, Finland. The use of DAPs was estimated using definitions from the previous scientific literature. The Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) was used to estimate the burden of co-morbidity and the Mini-Mental State Examination test was used to assess cognitive function. The risks in the two study groups for hospital visits, number of days spent in hospital care and mortality were measured from 2000 to the end of 2003.
The unadjusted follow-up mortality was 20.7% and 9.5% among the users and non-users of DAPs, respectively (p?=?0.010). However, the use of DAPs was not a significant predictor of mortality in multivariate analysis after adjustment for age, sex and CCI score (hazard ratio 1.57; 95% CI 0.78, 3.15). The mean?±?SD number of hospital days per person-year was higher in the DAP user group (14.9?±?32.5) than in the non-user group (5.2?±?12.3) [p?
PubMed ID
21275438 View in PubMed
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Association of neck pain, disability and neck pain during maximal effort with neck muscle strength and range of movement in women with chronic non-specific neck pain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178716
Source
Eur J Pain. 2004 Oct;8(5):473-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Jari Ylinen
Esa-Pekka Takala
Hannu Kautiainen
Matti Nykänen
Arja Häkkinen
Timo Pohjolainen
Sirkka-Liisa Karppi
Olavi Airaksinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Jyväskylä Central Hospital, Keskussairaalantie 19, 40620 Jyväskylä, Finland. jari.ylinen@ksshp.fi
Source
Eur J Pain. 2004 Oct;8(5):473-8
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Vertebrae - physiology
Chronic Disease
Disability Evaluation
Female
Finland
Head Movements - physiology
Humans
Isometric Contraction - physiology
Middle Aged
Muscle Contraction - physiology
Muscle Weakness - etiology - physiopathology
Neck Muscles - physiopathology
Neck Pain - etiology - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases
Pain Threshold - physiology
Questionnaires
Range of Motion, Articular - physiology
Stress, mechanical
Torque
Weight-Bearing
Abstract
Several studies have reported lower neck muscle strength in patients with chronic neck pain compared to healthy controls. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between the severity of neck pain and disability with neck strength and range of movement in women suffering from chronic neck pain. One hundred and seventy-nine female office workers with chronic neck pain were selected to the study. The outcome was assessed by the self-rating questionnaires on neck pain (visual analogue scale, Vernon's disability index, Neck pain and disability index) and by measures of the passive range of movement (ROM) and maximal isometric neck muscle strength. No statistically significant correlation was found between perceived neck pain and the disability indices and the maximal isometric neck strength and ROM measures. However, the pain values reported during the strength tests were inversely correlated with the results of strength tests (r=-0.24 to -0.46), showing that pain was associated with decreased force production. About two-thirds of the patients felt pain during test efforts. Pain may prevent full effort during strength tests and hence the production of maximal force. Thus in patients with chronic neck pain the results do not always describe true maximal strength, but rather the patients' ability to bear strain, which may be considerably influenced by their painful condition. The results of the present study suggest that rehabilitation in cases of chronic neck pain should aim at raising tolerance to mechanical strain.
PubMed ID
15324778 View in PubMed
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Associations of physical activity with self-rated health and well-being in middle-aged Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265039
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Mar;43(2):190-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Elina Engberg
Helena Liira
Katriina Kukkonen-Harjula
Svetlana From
Hannu Kautiainen
Kaisu Pitkälä
Heikki Tikkanen
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2015 Mar;43(2):190-6
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression - epidemiology
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Personal Satisfaction
Abstract
We examined the associations of physical activity (PA) frequency with self-rated health (SRH), self-rated well-being (SRW) and depressive symptoms, in middle-aged men in Finland.
The cross-sectional study comprised 665 men (mean age 41 ± 3 SD years; body mass index (BMI) 26.8 ± 4.2 SD kg/m(2)), who had completed the screening questionnaire of an intervention for men with cardiovascular risk factors. Their weekly frequency of PA was assessed by a questionnaire, SRH and SRW by visual analog scales (VAS), and depressive symptoms by the Patient Health Questionnaire-2 (PHQ-2).
The mean SRH ± SD (range of scale 0-100) by PA frequency categories was 56.2 ± 18.5 for PA sometimes or never, 63.8 ± 16.2 for PA about 1-2 times/week, and 71.1 ± 15.5 for PA at least 3 times/week. The mean SRW ± SD (range of scale 0-100) was 59.0 ± 20.4, 65.6 ± 17.6, and 68.9 ± 17.1, respectively. The mean PHQ-2 score ± SD (range of scale 0-6) by PA categories was 1.83 ± 1.40 for PA sometimes or never, 1.68 ± 1.28 for PA about 1-2 times/week, and 1.60 ± 1.31 for the PA at least 3 times/week group. SRH and SRW improved linearly with increasing PA frequency (both p
PubMed ID
25504655 View in PubMed
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