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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Source
Federation Proceedings. 22:795-800.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1963
Author
Hammel, H.T.
Author Affiliation
John B. Pierce Foundation Laboratory (New Haven)
Source
Federation Proceedings. 22:795-800.
Date
1963
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Skin temperature
Body temperature
Basal metabolic rate
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1020.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 295.
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One Method for Assessing Cold Tolerance: thermal and metabolic responses to moderate whole body cold exposure at night.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298780
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-32. 41 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
August 1965
  1 document  
Author
Hammel, H.T.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical report TR-64-32. 41 p.
Date
August 1965
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
3362959
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Body temperature
Mobile environmental chamber
Metabolism
Field methods
Cold tolerance
Physiological response
Abstract
The International Biological Program (IBP) is the successor in the biological field to the International Geophysical Year in the physical field. This report discusses one of the methods, approved by a Working Party of the IBP, for determining the cold tolerance of various ethnic groups under field conditions. A standardized cold stress for an eight-hour period during the night is provided by a portable environmental chamber developed by the contractor. Measurements of metabolism and body temperature, with a high degree of accuracy, and the obtaining of EEG and EMG tracings during the cold exposure, are necessary. These parameters can be obtained by either modifying standard medical laboratory equipment available from commercial sources, or constructing new equipment according to the instructions of the contractor.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.64-32
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Thermal and metabolic measurements on a reindeer at rest and in exercise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298767
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-54. 34 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1962
  1 document  
Author
Hammel, H.T.
Houpt, T.R.
Andersen, K.L.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-61-54. 34 p.
Date
June 1962
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2430510
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Animals
Reindeer
Metabolism
Heat production (Biology)
Body temperature
Arctic Regions
Fur
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Abstract
Adaptations which equip a mammal to cope with the cold stresses of the Arctic environment must at the same time be accompanied by responses which enable it to dissipate large quantities of heat produced during exercise. Some aspects of the heat producing and heat dissipating mechanisms were investigated in the reindeer, an example of a large well adapted Arctic mammal. The oxygen consumption of a reindeer while standing quietly was 606 ml/minute; while pulling a heavily loaded sled, 2390 ml/minute. The evaporative heat loss from the respiratory tract of a standing reindeer was 12 kcal/hour, or seven percent of the heat production; of a vigorously exercising reindeer, 130 kcal/hour, or 20 percent of the heat production. The temperature of the air expired at the nostril was as low as 14° C when the reindeer was standing in a wind at -16° C, and about 30° C at ambient temperatures near 0° C. After the animal exercised, the nostril temperature was 35° to 37° C. The heat production of the rumen ingesta was found to be as high as 0.09 kcal/hour per kilogram of body weight soon after feeding, or 5% to 10% of the basal heat production. The average surface temperature of the thinly furred parts of the reindeer was 5° to 11° C above ambient temperature, the hoof temperature 5° to 9° above ambient and the thickly furred parts only 2° to 4° C above ambient when the reindeer was conserving heat during rest. On the other hand, during vigorous exercise the thinly furred surface was 18° to 22° C above ambient temperature, the hoof was 21° to 28° C above ambient, and the thickly furred surfaces 12° to 15° C above ambient.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.61-54
Documents
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Thermal and metabolic response of the Kalahari Bushmen to moderate cold exposure at night.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298692
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-44. 29 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
September 1963
  1 document  
Author
Hammel, H.T.
Hildes, J.A.
Jackson, D.C.
Andersen, H.T.
Author Affiliation
John B. Pierce Laboratory, New Haven, Conn.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Air Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-62-44. 29 p.
Date
September 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
2107544
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Men
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Body temparature
Heat production (biology)
Shivering
Abstract
Studies were made of 10 adult male Bushmen and four Europeans during night-long exposure to ambient temperatures of approximately 6° C using only single-blanket sleeping bags . Four Bushmen were studied twice. Measurements were made of oxygen consumption, rectal and skin temperatures, muscle activity and sleep. Five Bushmen were also studied during a night with extra blankets. Rectal temperature of both groups started at about 36. 8° C, but in the Bushmen fell O. 7° C lower than in the Europeans during the cold night. Calculated mean body temperature also fell lower in the Bushmen. Mean skin temperature of the Bushmen started higher but was the same as that of the Europeans at the end of the night, although the foot temperatures of the Bushmen were lower. The heat production of both groups was the same at the start, expressed as kcal per kg lean body mass per hour (approximately 1.5). Both rose during the cold night but the Bushmen increase was only half as great as that of the Europeans . Shivering in the Bushmen was less than in the Europeans and sleep was interrupted less in the Bushmen. The results indicate a difference between Bushmen and Europeans in response to cold.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.62-44
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Thermal and metabolic responses of coastal Eskimos during a cold night.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1054
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1962 Nov; 17:953-960.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1962
Author
Hart, J.S.
Sabean, H.B.
Hildes, J.A.
Depocas, F.
Hammel, H.T.
Andersen, K.L.
Irving, L.
Foy, G.
Author Affiliation
National Research Council
Source
Journal of Applied Physiology. 1962 Nov; 17:953-960.
Date
1962
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Indigenous Groups
Inuit
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Pangnirtung
Skin temperature
Cold stress
Basal metabolic rate
Oxygen consumption
Sleep pattern
Humans
Inuits
Metabolism
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1022.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 297.
PubMed ID
13953036 View in PubMed
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Thermal and metabolic responses of the Australian Aborigine in summer while exposed to moderate cold during sleep.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298740
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Technical report TR-58-21. 40 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
July 1960
  1 document  
Author
Hammel, H.T.
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Alaskan Air Command. Ladd Air Force Base, Alaska. Technical report TR-58-21. 40 p.
Date
July 1960
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
1869928
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Australia
Aborigines
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Metabolism
Shivering
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.58-21
Documents
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6 records – page 1 of 1.