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24 records – page 1 of 3.

Are females at special risk of obesity if they become psychotic? The longitudinal Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82425
Source
Schizophr Res. 2006 May;84(1):15-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Hakko Helinä
Komulainen M Tuomas
Koponen Hannu
Saari Kaisa
Laitinen Jaana
Järvelin Marjo-Riitta
Lindeman Sari
Author Affiliation
Oulu University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, P.O. Box 26, 90029 Oulu University Hospital, Finland. helina.hakko@oulu.fi
Source
Schizophr Res. 2006 May;84(1):15-9
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdomen
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Catchment Area (Health)
Cohort Studies
Demography
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Male
Motor Activity
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - epidemiology
Smoking - epidemiology
Weight Gain
Abstract
Obesity is a serious health problem, especially in patients with long-term mental disorders. We explored the socio-demographic, psychiatric, and clinical factors that increase the risk of changing from under- or normal weight in adolescence to overweight/obese in adulthood. We found a 3.6-fold risk of weight gain in females with psychotic disorder. Other significant correlates of weight gain in males were physical inactivity, unhealthy diet, high alcohol consumption, and being single; and in females, chronic diseases, physical inactivity, high alcohol consumption, and having at least three children. These findings emphasize the importance of regular weight monitoring in clinical practice, especially in females with psychotic disorders.
PubMed ID
16626939 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association between age at onset and clinical features of schizophrenia: The Northern Finland 1966 birth cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86875
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Aug;23(5):331-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Luoma Suvi
Hakko Helinä
Ollinen Taru
Järvelin Marjo-Riitta
Lindeman Sari
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014 University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Aug;23(5):331-5
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the association between age at onset and the clinical picture of schizophrenia in an unselected young birth cohort. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The study sample consists of 98 (64 males and 34 females) individuals with DSM-III-R schizophrenia collected from the Northern Finland 1966 birth cohort. Firstly, subjects were divided into very early- and young-onset subgroups by using the median age at onset (22 years in males and 20 in females), as a cut-off point. Secondly, we used age at onset as a continuous variable. Clinical features of schizophrenia were assessed using the Operational Criteria Checklist for Psychotic Illnesses (OCCPI). RESULTS: Inappropriate affect, positive thought disorder and deterioration from premorbid level of function associate with very early-onset schizophrenia, while slowed activity and dysphoria relate to young-onset. These symptoms correlate significantly with the age at onset. DISCUSSION: Differences in the clinical picture associating to the age at onset of schizophrenia are seen early. CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that certain symptoms of schizophrenia are dependent on the age at onset, and schizophrenia occurring initially in early life has some typical features. Using the age at onset as a continuous variable is independent of arbitrary cut-off points and produces more explicable results.
PubMed ID
18455370 View in PubMed
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Association between physical illnesses and depressive symptoms requiring hospitalization in suicide victims.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92456
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2008 Sep 30;160(3):271-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2008
Author
Hakko Helinä
Manninen Jussi
Karvonen Kaisa
Särkioja Terttu
Meyer-Rochow V Benno
Räsänen Pirkko
Timonen Markku
Author Affiliation
Oulu University Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, P.O.Box 26, 90029 Oulu University Hospital, Finland. helina.hakko@oulu.fi
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2008 Sep 30;160(3):271-7
Date
Sep-30-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Alcohol-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Epidemiology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Humans
International Classification of Diseases
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Morbidity
Patient Discharge
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Suicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Suicide, Attempted - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
We examined an association between a history of hospital-treated depression and physical diseases in 1877 suicide victims from Northern Finland. Information on physical diseases and depression of victims was extracted from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Registers. Of suicide victims, 31% of female and 16% of male victims had a lifetime history of depression. When compared with victims without any lifetime hospital-treated physical illnesses, a history of depression was shown to associate with the diseases of the nervous, circulatory, respiratory, and musculoskeletal systems in the group of symptoms and signs, injuries and poisonings, and infectious diseases among male victims. Respectively, in female victims, an increased prevalence of depression was seen in endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, diseases of the nervous, circulatory, genitourinary, skin and subcutaneous tissue, and musculoskeletal systems, and with injuries and poisonings, pregnancy-related problems and infectious diseases. This study is the first to evaluate comorbidity between physical illnesses and depression over the lifetime in suicide victims; earlier studies reported findings in living patients from epidemiological or clinical populations. Since depression can affect quality of life in severely ill patients, targeting depression in patients with chronic illness may assist in decreasing suicide rates.
PubMed ID
18710785 View in PubMed
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Association of family background with adolescent smoking and regular use of illicit substances among underage psychiatric in-patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90921
Source
J Addict Dis. 2008;27(4):69-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Laukkanen Matti
Hakko Helinä
Riala Kaisa
Räsänen Pirkko
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Oulu University Hospital, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Addict Dis. 2008;27(4):69-79
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent, Institutionalized - psychology
Child
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Family Health
Family Relations
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Poverty
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
This study investigated whether adolescent's family type was associated with regular smoking or the use of illicit substances (cannabis or hard drugs) among underage adolescent psychiatric in-patients. The sample consisted of 471 adolescents aged 12-17 years admitted to psychiatric hospital between April 2001 and March 2006 at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. The information on family factors and substance use was based on the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime interview and the European modification of the Addiction Severity Index questionnaire. Compared to adolescent boys from two-parent families, those from child welfare placement were more likely to regularly use both cannabis (odds ratio [OR]=4.4; 95%confidence interval [CI]=1.4-13.7; P=.012) and hard drugs (OR=8.4; 95% CI=1.7-42.1; P=.01).Among girls, no association was found between family type and the use of illicit substances. Two-parent or foster family units may protect adolescents from involvement with illicit substances. In clinical adolescent psychiatric practice more attention should be paid to family interventions and parental support.
PubMed ID
19062350 View in PubMed
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Autumn peak in shooting suicides of children and adolescents from northern Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79268
Source
Neuropsychobiology. 2006;54(2):140-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Lahti Anniina
Räsänen Pirkko
Karvonen Kaisa
Särkioja Terttu
Meyer-Rochow V Benno
Hakko Helinä
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital, University of Oulu, FI-90029 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Neuropsychobiology. 2006;54(2):140-6
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cause of Death
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Firearms
Humans
Male
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Seasons
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
Suicide is one of the leading causes of death among adolescents worldwide. Studies on the seasonal pattern of youth suicides are rare and the results are very contradictory and heterogeneous. Generally, suicide methods affect the pattern of suicide seasonality. Shooting is the most common suicide method among Finnish adolescents. We investigated whether shooting suicides of victims aged less than 18 years are correlated with a specific period of the year. Also, the seasonal pattern of shooting suicides in adolescents was compared with that of adult victims. Our data comprised 42 adolescent suicide victims and, for comparison, 1,926 adult suicide victims over the years 1988 to 2004 from Northern Finland. Of these, 59.5% (n = 25) of the adolescents and 28.8% (n = 554) of the adults had committed suicide by shooting.We observed that shooting suicides among the under-aged showed a significant peak in autumn (ratio 2.70, 95% CI: 1.97-3.42), while those of adult victims peaked in spring (ratio 1.19, 95% CI: 1.05-1.35). The monthly pattern of suicides correlated significantly with the mean duration of daily sunshine hours (trailing by 3 months) in the under-aged (r = 0.67, p = 0.016), but not in the adults (r = 0.06, p = 0.854). The role of firearm availability, psychosocial factors such as start of the school year, and some biological factors are discussed.
PubMed ID
17199100 View in PubMed
Less detail

Birth measures and depression at age 31 years: the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92455
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2008 Sep 30;160(3):263-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-30-2008
Author
Herva Anne
Pouta Anneli
Hakko Helinä
Läksy Kristian
Joukamaa Matti
Veijola Juha
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University Hospital of Oulu, PL 26, FIN-90029 OYS, Finland. anne.herva@ppshp.fi
Source
Psychiatry Res. 2008 Sep 30;160(3):263-70
Date
Sep-30-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Birth weight
Body Size
Cohort Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Maternal Age
Personality Inventory
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Social Class
Abstract
The aim of the study was to explore whether there is an association between body size at birth measured by birth weight and ponderal index and later depression at the age of 31 years. The analyses were based on 4,007 males and 4,332 females born in 1966 in the two northernmost provinces of Finland with data on current depression measured by the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 questionnaire (HSCL-25) and self-reported physician-diagnosed lifetime depression at 31 years and childhood characteristics. The associations between birth measures and later depression were analysed with several confounding factors including maternal depression during pregnancy. Low birth measures did not associate with adult depression in men or women. Women with high birth weight (>or=4,500 g) had a higher risk for current depression compared to women with birth weight 3,000 g-3,499 g. Women with high ponderal index (the highest 90-95 percentiles and >or=95 percentiles) had a 1.53-1.55 higher likelihood for current depression compared with women with normal ponderal index. Based on this study, large body size at birth may be a risk factor for later depression.
PubMed ID
18710786 View in PubMed
Less detail

Body mass index (BMI) of drug-naïve psychotic adolescents based on a population of adolescent psychiatric inpatients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92154
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Oct;23(7):521-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Juutinen Jaana
Hakko Helinä
Meyer-Rochow V Benno
Räsänen Pirkko
Timonen Markku
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science and General Practice, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN 90014, Oulu, Finland. jaana.juutinen@oulu.fi
Source
Eur Psychiatry. 2008 Oct;23(7):521-6
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Body mass index
Child
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Male
Population Surveillance
Psychotic Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the connection between overweight and first-episode schizophrenia spectrum as well as non-schizophrenia spectrum psychiatric disorders in adolescent male and female drug-naïve psychiatric inpatients, whose illness was early onset. METHOD: Three hundred twenty-three adolescents with no past or present psychiatric medication, 12-17 years of age, admitted to the psychiatric inpatient care (Oulu University Hospital, Northern Finland) between April 2001 and March 2006. DSM-IV diagnoses were based on the "Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime" (K-SADS-PL). An adolescent was defined as overweight if his or her BMI was greater than or equal to the 85th percentile. RESULTS: Overweight values were highest in drug-naïve adolescent boys with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum (RR: 2.5, 95%CI: 1.08-4.29) and non-schizophrenia spectrum (RR: 2.80, 95%CI: 2.20-3.45) disorders. The RR in girls with non-schizophrenia spectrum disorders was 1.73 (95%CI: 1.31-2.23), but in those with first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorders RR did not differ from general population. CONCLUSIONS: In our study sample of first-episode schizophrenia spectrum drug-naïve adolescents, overweight was shown to be prevalent in all diagnostic groups other than first-episode schizophrenia spectrum psychotic girls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in which overweight was analyzed and verified among drug-naïve adolescent boys, suffering from first-episode schizophrenia spectrum disorder. To what extent our results are applicable to other regions and study groups, remains to be seen.
PubMed ID
18774272 View in PubMed
Less detail

Bullying behavior is related to suicide attempts but not to self-mutilation among psychiatric inpatient adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89855
Source
Psychopathology. 2009;42(2):131-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Luukkonen Anu-Helmi
Räsänen Pirkko
Hakko Helinä
Riala Kaisa
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. anuhelmi@paju.oulu.fi
Source
Psychopathology. 2009;42(2):131-8
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To investigate the association of bullying behavior with suicide attempts and self-mutilation among adolescents. SAMPLING AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of 508 Finnish adolescents (age 12-17 years) admitted to psychiatric inpatient care between April 2001 and March 2006. DSM-IV psychiatric diagnoses and variables measuring suicidal behavior (i.e. suicide attempts and self-mutilation) and bullying behavior (i.e. a victim, a bully or a bully-victim) were obtained from the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children Present and Lifetime (K-SADS-PL). Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the impact of being a victim, a bully or both a bully and a victim on suicide attempts and self-mutilation. RESULTS: After adjusting for age, school factors, family factors and psychiatric disorders, there was a higher risk of suicide attempts in girls who were victims of bullying (OR=2.07, CI=1.04-4.11, p=0.037) or who bullied others (OR=3.27, CI=1.08-9.95, p=0.037). Corresponding associations were not found for boys; nor was any association of bullying behavior with self-mutilation found among either sex. CONCLUSIONS: Among girls, being bullied or bullying others are both potential risk factors for suicidal behavior. Psychiatric assessment and treatment should thus be considered not only for victims of bullying, but also for bullies. Suicide-prevention programs should also routinely include interventions to reduce bullying. However, the generalization of our findings to all adolescents is limited because our study sample consisted of psychiatric adolescent patients. In addition, some of the possible findings might have remained statistically insignificant due to the small sample size among adolescents who had performed suicide attempts or self-mutilation.
PubMed ID
19246957 View in PubMed
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Decreased quality of life and depression as predictors for shorter survival among patients with low-grade gliomas: a follow-up from 1990 to 2003.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80745
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2006 Dec;256(8):516-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2006
Author
Mainio Arja
Tuunanen Satu
Hakko Helinä
Niemelä Asko
Koivukangas John
Räsänen Pirkko
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, 90014, Oulu, Finland. arja.mainio@oulu.fi
Source
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2006 Dec;256(8):516-21
Date
Dec-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Brain Neoplasms - mortality - psychology - surgery
Depressive Disorder - mortality - psychology
Disease Progression
Dominance, Cerebral - physiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glioma - mortality - psychology - surgery
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications - mortality - psychology
Prognosis
Quality of Life - psychology
Statistics
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To assess the long-term survival of brain tumor patients, and in particular to evaluate the relation of quality of life (QOL) to survival among low-grade glioma patients. METHODS: The postoperative survival of 101 brain tumor patients was followed from surgery (1990-1992) until the end of the year 2003. Depression was evaluated by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and QOL with Sintonen's 15D scale before operation and at one year as well as at five years after operation. RESULTS: The mean survival times in years (SD) were significantly related to tumor malignancy, being the shortest, 1.9 (0.6), for patients with high-grade gliomas, while patients with low-grade gliomas or a benign brain tumor had mean survival times of 9.1 (1.0) and 11.6 (0.5), respectively. At all follow-ups, depressed low-grade glioma patients had a significantly shorter survival time, 3.3-5.8 years, compared to non-depressed low-grade glioma patients, 10.0-11.7 years. A decreased level of QOL in low-grade glioma patients was significantly related to the shorter survival. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that depression and decreased QOL among low-grade glioma patients is related to shorter survival at long-term follow-up. Decreased QOL may serve as an indicator for poor prognosis in low-grade glioma patients.
PubMed ID
16960653 View in PubMed
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Drug-dependent boys are more depressed compared to girls: a comorbidity study of substance dependence and mental disorders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92994
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2008;14(3):161-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Ilomäki Risto
Södervall Jonna
Ilomäki Essi
Hakko Helinä
Räsänen Pirkko
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
Eur Addict Res. 2008;14(3):161-8
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Comorbidity
Conduct Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology
Depressive Disorder, Major - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology - rehabilitation
Abstract
The present study investigated the comorbidity of alcohol and drug dependence with psychiatric disorders by gender in a clinical sample of 300 girls and 208 boys (age 12-17) admitted to psychiatric inpatient hospitalization between April 2001 and March 2006. Information on alcohol and drug dependence, psychiatric diagnoses and age at onset of these disorders was obtained from the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Aged Children--Present and Lifetime. The results of logistic regression models revealed that behavioral disorders were associated with alcohol dependence among girls (odds ratio [OR] 7.1) and boys (OR 4.6). In addition, behavioral disorders were associated with drug dependence, the ORs being 18.4 in girls and 9.1 in boys. Although depressive disorders were associated with both alcohol (OR 3.1) and drug dependence (OR 3.8) among boys, no corresponding association was seen in girls. Our results suggest that physicians treating substance-dependent adolescents should focus not only on behavioral disorders, but also on the screening and treatment of underlying depressive disorders, especially among substance-dependent boys.
PubMed ID
18552492 View in PubMed
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24 records – page 1 of 3.