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[Diet of six-year-old Icelandic children - National dietary survey 2011-2012].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117006
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Ingibjorg Gunnarsdottir
Hafdis Helgadottir
Birna Thorisdottir
Inga Thorsdottir
Author Affiliation
University of Iceland, Iceland. ingigun@hi.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2013 Jan;99(1):17-23
Date
Jan-2013
Language
Icelandic
Geographic Location
Iceland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Child
Child Behavior
Child Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Dairy Products
Diet
Dietary Fats
Dietary Fiber
Dietary Sucrose
Energy intake
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Iceland
Minerals
Nutrition Assessment
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Nutritional Status
Seafood
Vegetables
Vitamins
Abstract
Knowledge of dietary habits makes the basis for public nutrition policy. The aim of this study was to assess dietary intake of Icelandic six-year-olds.
Subjects were randomly selected six-year-old children (n=162). Dietary intake was assessed by three-day-weighed food records. Food and nutrient intake was compared with the Icelandic food based dietary guidelines (FBDG) and recommended intake of vitamins and minerals.
Fruit and vegetable intake was on average 275±164 g/d, and less than 20% of the subjects consumed =400 g/day. Fish and cod liver oil intake was in line with the FBDG among approximately 25% of subjects. Most subjects (87%) consumed at least two portions of dairy products daily. Food with relatively low nutrient density (cakes, cookies, sugar sweetened drinks, sweets and ice-cream) provided up to 25% of total energy intake. The contribution of saturated fatty acids to total energy intake was 14.1%. Less than 20% of the children consumed dietary fibers in line with recommendations, and for saturated fat and salt only 5% consumed less than the recommended upper limits. Average intake of most vitamins and minerals, apart from vitamin-D, was higher than the recommended intake.
Although the vitamin and mineral density of the diet seems adequate, with the exception of vitamin-D, the contribution of low energy density food to total energy intake is high. Intake of vegetables, fruits, fish and cod liver oil is not in line with public recommendations. Strategies aiming at improving diet of young children are needed.
PubMed ID
23341402 View in PubMed
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European genome-wide association study identifies SLC14A1 as a new urinary bladder cancer susceptibility gene.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101497
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2011 Jul 22;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-2011
Author
Thorunn Rafnar
Sita H Vermeulen
Patrick Sulem
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Katja K Aben
J Alfred Witjes
Anne J Grotenhuis
Gerald W Verhaegh
Christina A Hulsbergen-van de Kaa
Soren Besenbacher
Daniel Gudbjartsson
Simon N Stacey
Julius Gudmundsson
Hrefna Johannsdottir
Hjordis Bjarnason
Carlo Zanon
Hafdis Helgadottir
Jon Gunnlaugur Jonasson
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Eirikur Jonsson
Gudmundur Geirsson
Sigfus Nikulasson
Vigdis Petursdottir
D Timothy Bishop
Sei Chung-Sak
Ananya Choudhury
Faye Elliott
Jennifer H Barrett
Margaret A Knowles
Petra J de Verdier
Charlotta Ryk
Annika Lindblom
Peter Rudnai
Eugene Gurzau
Kvetoslava Koppova
Paolo Vineis
Silvia Polidoro
Simonetta Guarrera
Carlotta Sacerdote
Angeles Panadero
José I Sanz-Velez
Manuel Sanchez
Gabriel Valdivia
Maria D Garcia-Prats
Jan G Hengstler
Silvia Selinski
Holger Gerullis
Daniel Ovsiannikov
Abdolaziz Khezri
Alireza Aminsharifi
Mahyar Malekzadeh
Leonard H van den Berg
Roel A Ophoff
Jan H Veldink
Maurice P Zeegers
Eliane Kellen
Jacopo Fostinelli
Daniele Andreoli
Cecilia Arici
Stefano Porru
Frank Buntinx
Abbas Ghaderi
Klaus Golka
José I Mayordomo
Giuseppe Matullo
Rajiv Kumar
Gunnar Steineck
Anne E Kiltie
Augustine Kong
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Kari Stefansson
Lambertus A Kiemeney
Author Affiliation
deCODE Genetics, Sturlugata 8, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Hum Mol Genet. 2011 Jul 22;
Date
Jul-22-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Three genome-wide association studies in Europe and the USA have reported eight urinary bladder cancer (UBC) susceptibility loci. Using extended case and control series and 1000 Genomes imputations of 5 340 737 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we searched for additional loci in the European GWAS. The discovery sample set consisted of 1631 cases and 3822 controls from the Netherlands and 603 cases and 37 781 controls from Iceland. For follow-up, we used 3790 cases and 7507 controls from 13 sample sets of European and Iranian ancestry. Based on the discovery analysis, we followed up signals in the urea transporter (UT) gene SLC14A. The strongest signal at this locus was represented by a SNP in intron 3, rs17674580, that reached genome-wide significance in the overall analysis of the discovery and follow-up groups: odds ratio = 1.17, P = 7.6 × 10(-11). SLC14A1 codes for UTs that define the Kidd blood group and are crucial for the maintenance of a constant urea concentration gradient in the renal medulla and, through this, the kidney's ability to concentrate urine. It is speculated that rs17674580, or other sequence variants in LD with it, indirectly modifies UBC risk by affecting urine production. If confirmed, this would support the 'urogenous contact hypothesis' that urine production and voiding frequency modify the risk of UBC.
PubMed ID
21750109 View in PubMed
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A sequence variant on 17q21 is associated with age at onset and severity of asthma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97455
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2010 Aug;18(8):902-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Eva Halapi
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Gudrun M Jonsdottir
Unnur S Bjornsdottir
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Hafdis Helgadottir
Carolyn Williams
Gerard H Koppelman
Andrea Heinzmann
H Marike Boezen
Aslaug Jonasdottir
Thorarinn Blondal
Sigurjon A Gudjonsson
Adalbjorg Jonasdottir
Theodora Thorlacius
Amanda P Henry
Janine Altmueller
Marcus Krueger
Hyoung Doo Shin
Soo-Taek Uh
Hyun Sub Cheong
Brynja Jonsdottir
Bjorn R Ludviksson
Dora Ludviksdottir
David Gislason
Choon-Sik Park
Klaus Deichmann
Philip J Thompson
Matthias Wjst
Ian P Hall
Dirkje S Postma
Thorarinn Gislason
Augustine Kong
Ingileif Jonsdottir
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
Population Genomics, deCODE Genetics Inc., Sturlugata 8, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Eur J Hum Genet. 2010 Aug;18(8):902-8
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A sequence variant (rs7216389-T) near the ORMDL3 gene on chromosome 17q21 was recently found to be associated with childhood asthma. We sought to evaluate the effect of rs7216389-T on asthma subphenotypes and its correlation with expression levels of neighboring genes. The association of rs7216389-T with asthma was replicated in six European and one Asian study cohort (N=4917 cases N=34 589 controls). In addition, we found that the association of rs7216389-T was confined to cases with early onset of asthma, particularly in early childhood (age: 0-5 years OR=1.51, P=6.89.10(-9)) and adolescence (age: 14-17 years OR=1.71, P=5.47.10(-9)). A weaker association was observed for onset between 6 and 13 years of age (OR=1.17, P=0.035), but none for adult-onset asthma (OR=1.07, P=0.12). Cases were further stratified by sex, asthma severity and atopy status. An association with greater asthma severity was observed among early-onset asthma cases (P=0.0012), but no association with sex or atopy status was observed among the asthma cases. An association between sequence variants and the expression of genes in the 17q21 region was assessed in white blood cell RNA samples collected from Icelandic individuals (n=743). rs7216389 associated with the expression of GSDMB and ORMDL3 genes. However, other sequence variants showing a weaker association with asthma compared with that of rs7216389 were more strongly associated with the expression of both genes. Thus, the contribution of rs7216389-T to the development of asthma is unlikely to operate only through an impact on the expression of ORMDL3 or GSDMB genes.
PubMed ID
20372189 View in PubMed
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