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25-Hydroxycholecaliferol and fractures of the proximal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252013
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1975
Author
B. Lund
O H Sorensen
A B Christensen
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Date
Aug-16-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcium - blood
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Femoral Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Great Britain
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood - metabolism
Kidney - metabolism
Middle Aged
Osteomalacia - blood - complications - etiology
Phosphorus - blood
Seasons
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-H.C.C.) has been measured in 67 consective cases of fracture of the proximal femur. The values found in these patients were not different from values found in these patients were not different from those in control groups at the same time of the year. Plasma 25-H.C.C. was not correlated to plasma calcium or phosphorus, the Ca times P product, or the alkaline phosphatase. X-rays showed Looser zones in only 1 patient, in whom the lowest plasma 25-H.C.C. was found. Osteomalacia is not uncommon among elderly people in Denmark, but it is more likely to depend on a decline in the renal efficiency to convert 25-H.C.C. to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol than a low dietary intake of vitamin D.
PubMed ID
50509 View in PubMed
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The Aarhus County Vagotomy Trial: trends in the problem of recurrent ulcer after parietal cell vagotomy and selective gastric vagotomy with drainage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243689
Source
World J Surg. 1982 Jan;6(1):86-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1982

[Acute sport-injuries. Risk factors judged from incidence, treatment and days of sickness].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249497
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 Oct 24;139(43):2593-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-1977

[Alcohol intake, Lewis phenotypes and risk of ischemic heart disease. The Copenhagen Male Study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11604
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Feb 28;156(9):1297-302
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-1994
Author
H O Hein
H. Sørensen
P. Suadicani
F. Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Rigshospitalet, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1994 Feb 28;156(9):1297-302
Date
Feb-28-1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Humans
Lewis Blood-Group System
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - genetics - mortality
Phenotype
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
In the Copenhagen Male Study we found an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) in men with the Lewis phenotype Le(a-b-). This study investigated whether, within the group of Le(a-b-) men, any conventional risk factors modified their increased risk. Three thousand, three hundred and eighty-three men aged 53 to 75 years were examined in 1985/86 and their morbidity and mortality over the next four years recorded. Three hundred and forty-three men with cardiovascular diseases were excluded at baseline. Potential risk factors examined were: alcohol consumption, physical activity, tobacco smoking, serum cotinine, serum lipids, body mass index, blood pressure, hypertension, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and social class. In eligible men with Le(a-b-), N = 280 (9.6%), alcohol was the only risk factor associated with risk of IHD. There was a significant inverse dose-effect relationship between alcohol consumption and risk. The age-adjusted p-values of trend tests were for risk of non-fatal + fatal IHD: p = 0.03; for risk of fatal IHD: p = 0.02. In eligible men with other phenotypes, N = 2,649 (90.4%) only a limited and non-significant negative association with alcohol. In Le(a-b-) men, a group genetically at increased risk of IHD, the risk was strongly and significantly negatively correlated with alcohol consumption.
PubMed ID
8009753 View in PubMed
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[A new function scale. I. Comparison with the point system currently used by the nursing staff].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242207
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Feb 7;145(6):447-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1983

[A new function scale. II. Used in 2 long-term care facilities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242206
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1983 Feb 7;145(6):451-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-7-1983

[Antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in medico-legal autopsy material]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8633
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Apr 11;150(15):910-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-11-1988

Attitudes of Canadian researchers toward the return to participants of incidental and targeted genomic findings obtained in a pediatric research setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116707
Source
Genet Med. 2013 Jul;15(7):558-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Conrad V Fernandez
Caron Strahlendorf
Denise Avard
Bartha M Knoppers
Colleen O'Connell
Eric Bouffet
David Malkin
Nada Jabado
Kym Boycott
Poul H Sorensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, IWK Health Centre and Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. conrad.fernandez@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
Genet Med. 2013 Jul;15(7):558-64
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Canada
Child
Data Collection
Disclosure - ethics
Ethics, Research
Genetic Research - ethics
Humans
Incidental Findings
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Research Personnel - ethics
Siblings
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes of genomics researchers in a pediatric setting in the context of regulatory guidance recommending the disclosure of clinically significant research findings.
A validated 32-item questionnaire was sent to 107 researchers with two large-scale projects (the Canadian Pediatric Cancer Genome Consortium and the Finding of Rare Genes Canada Consortium). We examined researchers' attitudes toward obligations to offer genomic research results (including if the participant was deceased, a relative, or a child), influence of the certainty/severity of the condition on this obligation, and personal experiences.
Of the 107 researchers, 74 (69%) responded. Researchers did not feel a strong responsibility to look for meaningful incidental results in the research genomic data set (n = 27, 37%). However, once identified, they felt participants had a strong right to receive them, irrespective of being incidental (n = 50, 68%) or primary targets (n = 64, 87%). There was a high degree of support for informing siblings of genomic results (n = 46, 62%), especially for treatable conditions (n = 56, 76%). Less than half of the participants indicated that their research ethics board required an offer of results (n = 34, 46%) or provided a detailed process (n = 16, 22%).
Researchers strongly support the offer of targeted and incidental genomic research results to participants. Greater regulatory guidance is needed for a consistent approach.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23370450 View in PubMed
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73 records – page 1 of 8.