Skip header and navigation

5 records – page 1 of 1.

[Clearing after erroneously administered racemic adrenaline]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11063
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 30;117(11):1647
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1997
Author
H. Reigstad
I. Grønlie
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1997 Apr 30;117(11):1647
Date
Apr-30-1997
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Labeling
Drug Packaging
Epinephrine - administration & dosage
Humans
Medical Errors
Norway
PubMed ID
9198955 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Diagnosis and treatment of congenital hyperinsulinism--to Paris at any price?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32252
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 20;121(5):612-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-20-2001
Author
O. Søvik
P R Njølstad
H. Reigstad
D. Brackman
I. Teslo
L. Brunvand
Author Affiliation
Barneklinikken, Haukeland Sykehus, 5021 Bergen. odso@haukeland.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 20;121(5):612-4
Date
Feb-20-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Clinical Competence
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hyperinsulinism - congenital - diagnosis - genetics - surgery
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Norway
Pancreatectomy
Paris
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Persistent hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia of infancy (PHHI) is a hyperfunctional disorder of pancreatic insulin-producing cells with hypertrophic beta-cells present either focally or diffusely. With an estimated frequency of 1:50,000 live births, Norway will on average have one case per year. It is clearly difficult to maintain expertise in diagnostics and treatment with such a low incidence. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We report three Norwegian patients with PHHI who were successfully treated at Hôpital des Enfants Malades in Paris. RESULTS: Two patients were shown to have focal hyperinsulinism treated with partial pancreas resection. After follow-up of three and a half and two years respectively, these patients have normal glucose tolerance and exocrine pancreatic function. One patient with diffuse hyperinsulinism was operated with subtotal (90%) pancreatectomy. At 2.5-years follow-up this patient has slight glucose intolerance whereas her fasting blood glucose is low normal. The exocrine pancreatic function is normal. INTERPRETATION: Patients with PHHI should be referred to a centre where the possibility of focal hyperinsulinism can be thoroughly explored.
PubMed ID
11301621 View in PubMed
Less detail

Preterm elective caesarean section and early enteral feeding in gastroschisis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96365
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2010 Jul 8;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-8-2010
Author
I. Reigstad
H. Reigstad
T. Kiserud
T. Berstad
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2010 Jul 8;
Date
Jul-8-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Abstract Reigstad, I, Reigstad, H, Kiserud, T, Berstad, T. Gastroschisis in western Norway. Aims: To evaluate the effect of elective caesarean section before term and early enteral nutrition on length of parenteral nutrition and hospital stay in infants with gastroschisis Methods: Retrospective review of all infants with gastroschisis treated in a regional level III hospital from 1993 to 2008. During 1993-97 there was no established standard for management of pregnancy or delivery while a protocol on close foetal monitoring and early elective caesarean section was adhered to for 1998-2008. Introduction of human milk on the first day after complete closure of the abdominal wall and rapid increase was the policy during the whole period. Results: With early elective caesarean section no foetal deaths occurred after 28 weeks' gestational age (GA). Ten infants were born during the first and 20 during the second period at a median GA (range) of 36.5 (34-40) and 35 (34-37) weeks (p=0.013). Seven and 20, respectively, were born by caesarean section. Median (range) days before full enteral feeds and hospital stay were 11.5 (7-39) and 13.0 (7-46) (p= 0.85), and 17.5 (12-36) and 22.5 (13-195) (p=0.67), respectively. One child died of volvolus after discharge. Conclusion: Close surveillance of pregnancy, elective preterm caeserean section, early surgery and active approach to primary closure and early enteral feeds appears to be a safe and effective line of management in gastroschisis.
PubMed ID
20626366 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 10;120(1):14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-10-2000
Author
H. Reigstad
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Jan 10;120(1):14
Date
Jan-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Guidelines
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal
Norway
Resuscitation
PubMed ID
10815471 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Treatment of extremely premature infants--which limits and what problems?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58653
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):711-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-28-2001
Author
H. Reigstad
T. Markestad
Author Affiliation
Barneklinikken Haukeland Sykehus 5021 Bergen. hallvard.reigstad@haukeland.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Feb 28;121(6):711-4
Date
Feb-28-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Infant, Premature, Diseases - drug therapy - therapy
Infant, Very Low Birth Weight
Intensive Care, Neonatal - methods
Risk factors
Abstract
In Norway about 300 babies with a birthweight of 500-999 grams and 200 with a gestational age of 24-27 weeks are born annually. This gives a total of 320-330 babies who come under the definition of extreme prematurity. Obstetric care is important in order to avoid premature birth, or, when premature birth is unavoidable, to find the optimal time and place for delivery. There is ongoing discussion of what constitutes reasonable lower limits for offering life support. The survival rate for babies born before 24 gestational weeks is low and the risk of serious neurological damage high. The risk of severe lung disease is reduced with pre- and postnatal treatment with corticosteroids and postnatal treatment with surfactant, but excessive corticosteroid treatment may possibly increase the risk of neurological damage. Despite major recent progress in the treatment of the preterm baby, significant understanding of why disabilities occur is lacking.
PubMed ID
11293356 View in PubMed
Less detail