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57 records – page 1 of 6.

Antivenom treatment in Vipera berus envenoming--report of 30 cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35949
Source
J Intern Med. 1994 Jan;235(1):57-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
C. Karlson-Stiber
H. Persson
Author Affiliation
Swedish Poison Information Centre, Stockholm.
Source
J Intern Med. 1994 Jan;235(1):57-61
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antivenins - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin Fab Fragments - therapeutic use
Infant
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Snake Bites - physiopathology - therapy
Sweden
Treatment Outcome
Viper Venoms - antagonists & inhibitors - poisoning
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. To assess efficacy and safety of two equine F(ab')2 antivenoms currently used to treat envenoming by European vipers. DESIGN. Retrospective case review study. SETTING. Case records collected by the Swedish Poison Information Centre concerning patients treated in Swedish hospitals for bites by the common European adder, Vipera berus. SUBJECTS. Patients presenting with V. berus envenoming treated with antivenom (n = 30) and two groups of patients not given antivenom (n = 16 and n = 38). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Clinical course and time in hospital were retrospectively studied and compared in patients treated or not treated with antivenom. RESULTS. There was a significantly lower incidence of extensive oedema (23 vs. 88%) and anaemia (10 vs. 50%) in the antivenom-treated group, and the hospital stay was shorter (median: 3 vs. 6 days). Antivenom treatment also resulted in prompt clinical improvement in the acute phase. Adverse effects consisting of urticaria and serum sickness occurred in 10% of the patients given antivenom. CONCLUSIONS. Antivenom treatment was associated with a reduced morbidity in severe V. berus envenoming. However, the occurrence of allergic side-effects is not negligible with this type of antivenom.
PubMed ID
8283161 View in PubMed
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Application of human leukocyte antigen matching in the allocation of kidneys from cadaveric organ donors in the Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180571
Source
Transplantation. 2004 Feb 27;77(4):621-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-27-2004
Author
Melvin Madsen
Páll Asmundsson
Øystein H Bentdal
Styrbjörn Friman
Nils H Persson
Kaija Salmela
Niels Grunnet
Author Affiliation
Scandiatransplant, Department of Clinical Immunology, Aarhus University Hospital, Skejby Sygehus, Denmark.
Source
Transplantation. 2004 Feb 27;77(4):621-3
Date
Feb-27-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cadaver
Histocompatibility testing
Humans
Kidney
Kidney Transplantation
Resource Allocation
Scandinavia
Tissue Donors
Abstract
The Nordic organ exchange organization Scandiatransplant was founded in 1969. It covers a population of 24.41 million inhabitants in five countries: Denmark (5.45 million), Finland (5.19 million), Iceland (0.29 million), Norway (4.54 million), and Sweden (8.94 million). Initially, the purpose of Scandiatransplant was to establish and maintain a common waiting list for all Nordic patients with end-stage renal failure waiting for a cadaveric kidney transplant. The basis of maintaining a common Nordic waiting list was the recognition of the wide polymorphism of the human leukocyte antigen system, which demands a substantial pool of waiting patients to provide optimal histocompatibility matching between organ donor and recipient. Thus, one of the major tasks of the organization was and still is to specify rules for the exchange of kidneys between the participating transplant centers. Scandiatransplant includes the cooperation of all 10 Nordic kidney transplant centers in addition to eight immunology laboratories. Denmark has four transplant centers located in Copenhagen, Herlev, Odense, and Aarhus. Finland has one center in Helsinki. Norway has one center located in Oslo. Sweden has four kidney transplantation centers located in each of the university hospitals in Göteborg, Malmö, Stockholm, and Uppsala. The fifth Nordic country, Iceland, is participating fully in organ donation but has no individual transplant center. Organ transplantation in Icelandic patients is performed in other Nordic countries.
PubMed ID
15084949 View in PubMed
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Beta-adrenoceptor blocker intoxication: epidemiological data. Prenalterol as an alternative in the treatment of cardiac dysfunction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12885
Source
Hum Toxicol. 1983 Apr;2(2):175-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1983
Author
P. Kulling
L. Eleborg
H. Persson
Source
Hum Toxicol. 1983 Apr;2(2):175-81
Date
Apr-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - poisoning
Adult
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Heart Diseases - chemically induced - drug therapy
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Practolol - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Prenalterol
Propranolol - poisoning
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
1 During the three years 1978--1980 the Swedish Poison Information Centre received reports of 184 patients hospitalized due to beta-adrenoceptor blocker overdosage. Of the 35 patients who developed signs of severe cardiac dysfunction (HR less than 50 beats/min, systolic blood pressure less than 80 mm Hg), 23 had ingested propranolol, 10 metoprolol and 2 alprenolol. 2 The mean value of the defined daily doses (DDD) per 1000 inhabitants per day in Sweden during these years were 11.97 for propranolol, 8.02 for alprenolol and 7.74 for metoprolol. The incidence of severe poisoning due to alprenolol overdosage is lower than expected according to DDD. 3 During 1979 19 persons died from overdosage with beta-adrenoceptor blockers in Sweden: 15 due to propranolol (non-selective, lacks intrinsic sympathomimetic activity), 2 to metoprolol (cardioselective, lacks intrinsic sympathomimetic activity). These findings indicate that severe and even fatal poisoning may occur regardless of the type of beta-blocking agent. 4 The usefulness of prenalterol, a cardioselective beta-adrenoceptor partial agonist, in reversing unwanted cardiac effects of beta-adrenoceptor blocking agents is illustrated by two cases of massive propranolol intoxication (maximal plasma concentrations of propranolol 7.2 and 7.8 mumol/l respectively). Prenalterol in high doses (130 and 280 mg/24 h respectively) restored cardiac function.
PubMed ID
6134663 View in PubMed
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Causes of graft loss and mortality in cyclosporine-treated cadaveric kidney graft recipients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235642
Source
Transplant Proc. 1987 Feb;19(1 Pt 2):1831-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1987

Citalopram overdose--review of cases treated in Swedish hospitals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210166
Source
J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1997;35(3):237-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
M. Personne
G. Sjöberg
H. Persson
Author Affiliation
Swedish Poisons Informaation Centre, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. gic.@gic.ks.se
Source
J Toxicol Clin Toxicol. 1997;35(3):237-40
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Citalopram - poisoning
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Drug Interactions
Drug Overdose
Electrocardiography - drug effects
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poison Control Centers
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Seizures - chemically induced
Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors - poisoning
Sweden
Abstract
The toxic effects of acute citalopram overdose are reported by the Swedish Poisons Information Centre.
Case reports received from Swedish hospitals during 1995 have been analyzed. Forty-four cases of pure citalopram intoxication have been studied in detail.
At doses below 600 mg, mild symptoms were observed. Doses above 600 mg caused ECG abnormalities and convulsions in some patients, while doses greater than 1900 mg caused such symptoms in all patients.
The findings are consistent with previous reports claiming that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are less toxic compared to tricyclic antidepressants. However, there is a risk of developing serious symptoms when large doses have been ingested.
Notes
Erratum In: J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1997;35(5):577
PubMed ID
9140316 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lancet. 1997 Aug 16;350(9076):518-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1997
Author
M. Personne
H. Persson
E. Sjöberg
Source
Lancet. 1997 Aug 16;350(9076):518-9
Date
Aug-16-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antidepressive Agents - poisoning
Citalopram - poisoning
Electrocardiography
Humans
Middle Aged
Poisoning - diagnosis
Sweden
Notes
Comment In: Lancet. 1997 Sep 13;350(9080):8189298037
Comment On: Lancet. 1997 May 31;349(9065):16029174567
Comment On: Lancet. 1996 Aug 3;348(9023):339-408709713
PubMed ID
9274602 View in PubMed
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Compliance with the rules of kidney exchange in Scandiatransplant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224441
Source
Transplant Proc. 1992 Feb;24(1):339
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992

Diagnosis and treatment of twin pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60668
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1979;28(4):311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1979
Author
P H Persson
L. Grennert
Source
Acta Genet Med Gemellol (Roma). 1979;28(4):311-7
Date
1979
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bed Rest
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Labor, Induced
Obstetric Labor, Premature - prevention & control
Placental Lactogen - analysis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Multiple
Sweden
Twins
Ultrasonography
Abstract
Early detection is a prerequisite for the active management of twin pregnancy. Detection rate was not, or was only slightly, increased by improved anamnesis or more alert physical examination. General placental lactogen screening selected 95% of the twins but implied a subsequent ultrasonic screening examination of 16% of the pregnant population for the definitive diagnosis. A general screening programme with ultrasound detected 90% of the twin pregnancies (methodological error 1.7%; not participating 8%) in the mid-trimester. Extensive restriction of maternal physical activity from the 29th to the 36th gestational week by bed rest in hospital reduced perinatal mortality to the level of singletons and also decreased the incidence of neurological and mental handicap among the surviving twins. For the supervision of twin pregnancy, urinary estriol estimates predict birth weight rather than fetal distress. Monitoring with repeated ultrasonic biparietal diameter measurements seem limited in value; even large intertwin BPD differences are not indicators of fetal distress in the smallest twin. The decrease of perinatal mortality and morbidity among twins subjected to special antenatal supervision suggests that large gains can be made by early detection and antenatal hospitalization. The earlier finding that impairment of the intrauterine supply line is closely associated with neurological sequelae gives added importance to the reduction of CNS handicap and of growth-retarded fetuses observed during such a programme.
PubMed ID
555203 View in PubMed
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Diagnostic tests, treatment and follow-up in heart failure patients--is there a gender bias in the coherence to guidelines?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52453
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 1999 Dec;1(4):407-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
M. Mejhert
J. Holmgren
P. Wändell
H. Persson
M. Edner
Author Affiliation
Division of Internal Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Heart Fail. 1999 Dec;1(4):407-10
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Echocardiography
Female
Guideline Adherence
Heart Failure, Congestive - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Humans
Length of Stay
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Practice Guidelines
Referral and Consultation
Retrospective Studies
Sex Factors
Survival Rate
Sweden
Abstract
AIMS: To relate clinical data in a consecutive cohort of patients admitted with heart failure in Sweden to demographic data and the use of diagnostic tests, medical treatment, care process and mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: Retrospective investigation of all charts concerning patients discharged with primary diagnosis of heart failure in two Swedish hospitals during the second half of 1995 was undertaken. Records from 187 men and 192 women were analyzed, median age was 78 years. During hospital stay 75% of the patients, regardless of gender, were examined with chest radiography. Echocardiography was performed in 59% of all patients, more often in men than in women (68% vs. 55%, P
PubMed ID
10937955 View in PubMed
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[Don't extend sale of the non-prescription drugs. There is a risk of diminished respect, increased number of poisoning cases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68541
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Nov 10;90(45):3923-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1993
Author
H. Persson
G. Sjöberg
E. Torell
Author Affiliation
Giftinformationscentralen, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1993 Nov 10;90(45):3923-4
Date
Nov-10-1993
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drug Industry
Drug Information Services
Drugs, Non-Prescription - poisoning
Humans
Poisoning - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Self Medication
Suicide - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
8231549 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.