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Adult recovered memories of childhood sexual abuse.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211764
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1996 Jun;41(5):305-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996

The attitudes toward committal of patients hospitalized in a psychiatric facility for the first time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229153
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1990 May;35(4):324-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1990
Author
P. Conlon
H. Merskey
C. Zilli
K. Frommhold
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, Victoria Hospital, London, Ontario.
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1990 May;35(4):324-7
Date
May-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - psychology
Adult
Aged
Bipolar Disorder - psychology
Commitment of Mentally Ill - legislation & jurisprudence
Consumer Satisfaction
Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Ontario
Psychotic Disorders - psychology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - psychology
Suicide, Attempted - psychology
Abstract
This study examines the attitudes toward committal of patients admitted to a psychiatric facility for the first time. Sixteen patients, from a group of 28 patients consecutively admitted to hospital on an Ontario Form 1 certificate were able to complete a satisfactory interview. In general, patients viewed the committal procedure favourably. They endorsed medical professionals as being best qualified to institute the committal procedure. A discrepancy between behaviour documented on the committal form and the patients' own perception of their mental state at the time of committal was noted. These findings are discussed with reference to previous research on civil commitment.
PubMed ID
2346898 View in PubMed
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Clinical data from a psychiatric service to a group of native people.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3390
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Aug;26(5):345-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1981
Author
M. Pelz
H. Merskey
C. Brant
P G Patterson
G F Heseltine
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1981 Aug;26(5):345-8
Date
Aug-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - rehabilitation
Referral and Consultation
Social Environment
Abstract
Clinical data are reported from a psychiatric service to Native Canadian patients, mainly Cree Indians. Eighteen out of 41 had a clinical diagnosis of depression, three of mania and only one of schizophrenia. Thirty-seven percent used alcohol to excess but alcoholism was rarely the primary diagnosis. Reasons are given for the belief that schizophrenia has been over-diagnosed in Native populations in the past. Seventy-eight percent spoke Cree/Inuit as their primary language. The patients usually held their parents in high regard despite often reporting that they were alcoholic. In reply to tentative enquiries into feelings about their Native identity, only 5% of the patients indicated a preference for another identity, but this figure is only considered to give a minimum estimate of the possible dissatisfaction with being Native in Canada today.
PubMed ID
7296452 View in PubMed
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Effect of eliminating compensation for pain and suffering on the outcome of insurance claims.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196942
Source
N Engl J Med. 2000 Oct 12;343(15):1119; author reply 1120
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-12-2000

Environmental exposures in elderly Canadians with Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214601
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1995 Aug;22(3):232-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
S. Chaturvedi
T. Ostbye
A J Stoessl
H. Merskey
V. Hachinski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 1995 Aug;22(3):232-4
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesives
Aged
Canada
Data Collection
Environmental Exposure
Epoxy Resins
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Paint
Parkinson Disease - etiology
Abstract
Etiologic hypotheses for Parkinson's disease have implicated environmental factors, genetic factors, or a combination of the two.
Data from a survey of elderly Canadians (n = 10,263) with regard to their history of Parkinson's disease and previous environmental exposures were analyzed. Exposure to various environmental factors was compared between 87 patients with Parkinson's disease and 2070 elderly controls without Parkinson's disease.
Exposure to plastic resins (OR (odd ratio) = 8.79), epoxy resins (OR = 6.94), glues (OR = 4.26), paints (OR = 3.84), and petroleum (OR = 2.30) products was significantly (p
Notes
Comment In: Can J Neurol Sci. 1996 May;23(2):1578738932
PubMed ID
8529177 View in PubMed
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Fallacies in the pathological confirmation of the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206863
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1998 Jan;64(1):18-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
J V Bowler
D G Munoz
H. Merskey
V. Hachinski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, John P Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. j.bowler@cxwms.ac.uk
Source
J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry. 1998 Jan;64(1):18-24
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alzheimer Disease - mortality - pathology
Autopsy - standards
Bias (epidemiology)
Case-Control Studies
Comorbidity
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Predictive value of tests
Psychometrics
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Abstract
Necropsy confirmed clinical diagnostic accuracy for Alzheimer's disease is claimed to exceed 90%. This figure contains two fallacies; it includes cases in which Alzheimer's disease exists with other diseases affecting cognition and the studies that report these figures excluded cases without necropsy (verification bias). The effect of these errors is estimated.
Data were taken from the University of Western Ontario Dementia Study, a registry of dementia cases with clinical and psychometric follow up to necropsy based in a university memory disorders clinic with secondary and tertiary referrals. Data were available on 307 patients; 200 (65%) had clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease, 12 (4%) vascular dementia, 47 (15%) mixed dementia, and 48 (16%) had other diagnoses. One hundred and ninety two of 307 cases (63%) died and 122 of 192 fatalities (64%) had necropsies. The pathological material was interpreted in two ways, allowing and disallowing coexistent disease in making a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. In cases without necropsy, progressive cognitive loss was used as a marker for degenerative dementia. The outcome measures of interest were the positive predictive value of a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease allowing and disallowing coexistent diseases and with and without correction for cases that were not necropsied.
The clinical diagnoses differed significantly between the population who died and those who did not. In cases without necropsy, 22% had no dementia on follow up, concentrated in early cases and men, showing considerable scope for verification bias. The positive predictive value of a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease was 81% including coexistent diseases, falling to 44% when limited to pure cases. Combined, these factors reduce the positive predictive value to 38% for pure Alzheimer's disease.
Correction for dual pathology and verification bias halves the positive predictive value of the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Data derived from necropsy studies cannot be extrapolated to the whole population. This has important implications including uncertainty about diagnosis and prognosis and a dilution effect in therapeutic trials in Alzheimer's disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
9436722 View in PubMed
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A note on the occurrence of pain in psychiatric patients from a Canadian indian and Inuit population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3391
Source
Pain. 1981 Feb;10(1):75-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1981
Author
M. Pelz
H. Merskey
C C Brant
G F Heseltine
Source
Pain. 1981 Feb;10(1):75-8
Date
Feb-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Depression - complications
Female
Head
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Ontario
Pain - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
Fifty patients are reported from a psychiatric service to a Native population. Thirty-two (64%) had pain of whom 19 had physical lesions. The number with pain is thought to be somewhat higher than might have been predicted from a priori considerations. Depression was the commonest psychiatric diagnosis both with and without pain. The head was the commonest site for pain whilst no patient had pain in the back as a primary complaint and only two had back pain as a secondary complaint.
PubMed ID
7232013 View in PubMed
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Prediction of discharge from a psychogeriatric unit (development and evaluation of the LPRS Prognosis Index).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245882
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 1980 Apr;25(3):234-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1980

The prevalence of current major depression and dysthymia in a Norwegian general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46404
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1997 Apr;95(4):324-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1997
Author
H. Vaerøy
H. Merskey
Author Affiliation
Oppland Psychiatric Hospital, Reinsvoll, Norway.
Source
Acta Psychiatr Scand. 1997 Apr;95(4):324-8
Date
Apr-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depressive Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Diagnosis, Differential
Dysthymic Disorder - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Family Practice - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Patient Care Team - utilization
Somatoform Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Abstract
Existing studies suggest that depression is underdiagnosed and undertreated in general practice, and that the known prevalence of this mood disorder in a primary care population may represent only the "tip of the iceberg'. A total of 100 consecutive patients in an average Norwegian general practice were tested, of whom 31 patients were diagnosed as having a depressive illness in this study; 28 patients were diagnosed as having current major depression and three as having dysthymia. In total, 21 of the 28 patients with current major depression presented with other symptoms as their major complaints at the consultation in which they were tested. Twelve of these 21 patients had some kind of pain problem.
PubMed ID
9150827 View in PubMed
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Psychiatric disorders in an Arctic community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3322
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2000 May;45(4):357-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
J. Haggarty
Z. Cernovsky
P. Kermeen
H. Merskey
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Western Ontario, London. jhaggart@julian.uwo.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2000 May;45(4):357-62
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Arctic Regions - epidemiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine the rates of depression, anxiety, and alcohol abuse, using modern nosology, in a random sample of residents aged 14 to 85 years living in an Arctic community. METHOD: A cross-sectional 2-step survey of randomly selected households was undertaken, using a self-report questionnaire to screen for anxiety, depression, and alcohol abuse. The survey included the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Ewing and Roose's 4-question alcohol screening instrument (the CAGE questionnaire). Cut-off scores for the HADS and CAGE were found by comparing HADS and CAGE scores with scores on the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-III-R (SCID) in a stratified subsample. RESULTS: Estimated rates of depression and anxiety were 26.5% and 19.0% respectively within the past week, and estimated rates of lifetime alcohol abuse were 30.5%. CONCLUSIONS: The estimated prevalence of psychiatric disorders in this Arctic community is higher than that indicated in previous findings on Native mental health.
PubMed ID
10813069 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.