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Alcohol intemperance and social disability as risk factors for different causes of death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12689
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1986;220(4):351-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
H. Aberg
H. Lithell
I. Selinus
H. Hedstrand
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1986;220(4):351-9
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Risk
Social Problems
Sweden
Abstract
At a follow-up 7-10 years after a health screening of 50-year-old men in Uppsala, 101 of the 2322 participants and 51 of the 446 non-participants had died. The incidence was thus almost three times as high among non-participants as among participants. Registration at the Temperance Board and/or the Bureau of Social Services was 2-3 times more common among the deceased subjects than among the living irrespective of participation in the health screening. A multiple logistic analysis revealed that non-participation and both types of registration were associated with an increased risk of death. For death from neoplasm only registration at the Bureau of Social Services, and not that at the Temperance Board, was a risk factor. For ischaemic heart disease (IHD), on the other hand, registration at the Temperance Board was the strongest risk factor, the other type of registration being secondary, and non-participation in the screening was a non-significant risk factor. The importance of alcohol intemperance as a risk factor for IHD was reflected in the fact that every second subject dying a sudden death (classified as IHD death) was registered at the Temperance Board. These results indicate that alcohol intemperance entails an increased risk of developing fatal complications to IHD, and social disability may carry with it a risk of both neoplasm and, to a lesser extent, death from IHD.
PubMed ID
3799240 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intemperance and sudden death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12582
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Jun 6;294(6585):1456-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-1987
Author
H. Lithell
H. Aberg
I. Selinus
H. Hedstrand
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Jun 6;294(6585):1456-8
Date
Jun-6-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications
Blood pressure
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Death, Sudden - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
Ten years after a health screening examination was offered to 50 year old men 32 of the 2322 participants and 12 of the 454 nonparticipants had died of ischaemic heart disease. Of these, 26 and 11 respectively had suffered sudden death, for which necropsy was performed. Half of the men who had died suddenly had been registered for alcohol intemperance up to 1973, which was four times the prevalence of such registrations in the general population. Registration at both the Swedish Temperance Board and the Bureau of Social Services was associated with an odds ratio of 3.74 for sudden death as compared with not being registered at either. Logistic analysis including the classical risk factors for ischaemic heart disease together with registration for alcohol intemperance and at the Bureau of Social Services showed only the two types of registration and systolic blood pressure to be independent risk factors. On the other hand, there was no overrepresentation of subjects entered in the registers among those surviving a myocardial infarction. For non-fatal myocardial infarction blood pressure and serum triglyceride concentration were significant risk factors and serum cholesterol concentration, smoking, and body mass index probable risk factors; the two types of registration were not independent risk factors. Alcohol intemperance is strongly associated with an increased risk of sudden death after myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
3111584 View in PubMed
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Antibodies against cardiolipin and oxidatively modified LDL in 50-year-old men predict myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54451
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1997 Nov;17(11):3159-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
R. Wu
S. Nityanand
L. Berglund
H. Lithell
G. Holm
A K Lefvert
Author Affiliation
Immunological Research Laboratory, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 1997 Nov;17(11):3159-63
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antibodies, Anticardiolipin - blood - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood - immunology
Body mass index
Cardiolipins - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunoglobulin A - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin M - blood - immunology
Incidence
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - immunology - prevention & control
Odds Ratio
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Autoantibodies against oxidatively modified low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and cardiolipin occur in patients with vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. The ability of such antibodies to predict myocardial infarction (MI) was investigated in a prospective nested case-control study in which healthy 50-year-old men were followed up for 20 years. Raised levels of antibodies against oxLDL and cardiolipin at 50 years of age correlated positively with the incidence of MI and mortality related to MI 10 to 20 years later. IgG and IgA antibodies against cardiolipin were associated with MI between 50 to 60 years of age and IgG and IgA antibodies against oxLDL with MI at 60 to 70 years of age. Moreover, higher antibody levels were noted in those who died from acute MI in comparison to those who survived. The predictive power of IgA and IgG antibodies was strong and largely independent of that of other strong risk factors. In conclusion, raised levels of antibodies against oxLDL and cardiolipin may predict MI and MI-related death.
PubMed ID
9409306 View in PubMed
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Atrial fibrillation is an independent determinant of low cognitive function: a cross-sectional study in elderly men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48067
Source
Stroke. 1998 Sep;29(9):1816-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
L. Kilander
B. Andrén
H. Nyman
L. Lind
M. Boberg
H. Lithell
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Social Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Sweden.
Source
Stroke. 1998 Sep;29(9):1816-20
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anti-Arrhythmia Agents - administration & dosage
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Cerebrovascular Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cognition
Cognition Disorders - epidemiology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Digoxin - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebrovascular disease is increasingly recognized as a cause of dementia and cognitive decline. We have previously reported an association between hypertension and diabetes and low cognitive function in the elderly. Atrial fibrillation is another main risk factor for cerebrovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether atrial fibrillation is associated with low cognitive function in elderly men with and without previous manifest stroke. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study based on a cohort of 952 community-living men, aged 69 to 75 years, in Uppsala, Sweden. Cognitive functions were assessed by the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Trail Making Tests, and a composite z score was calculated. The relation between atrial fibrillation and cognitive z score was analyzed, with stroke and other vascular risk factors taken into account. RESULTS: All analyses were adjusted for age, education, and occupational level. Men with atrial fibrillation (n=44) had lower mean adjusted cognitive z scores (-0.26+/-0.11) than men without atrial fibrillation (+0.14+/-0.03; P=0.0003). The exclusion of stroke patients did not alter this relationship; the mean cognitive z score was -0.24+/-0.12 in the 36 men with atrial fibrillation and +0.17+/-0.03 in those without atrial fibrillation (P=0.0004), corresponding to a difference of 0.4 SDs between groups. Adjustments for 24-hour diastolic blood pressure and heart rate, diabetes, and ejection fraction did not change this relationship. Men with atrial fibrillation who were treated with digoxin (n=27) performed markedly better (-0.05+/-0.21) than those without treatment (n=9; -1.14+/-0.34; adjusted P=0.0005). Previous myocardial infarction was not associated with impaired cognitive results. CONCLUSIONS: In these community-living elderly men, we found an association between atrial fibrillation and low cognitive function independent of stroke, high blood pressure, and diabetes. Interventional studies are needed to answer the question of whether optimal treatment of atrial fibrillation may prevent or postpone cognitive decline and dementia.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 1999 Jan;30(1):190-19880414
PubMed ID
9731601 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure control in a middle-aged male population. A 6-9 year follow-up with special reference to the problem of non-responders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75272
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1980;208(6):467-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
H. Aberg
H. Hadstrand
H. Lithell
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1980;208(6):467-71
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Sweden
Abstract
A health examination survey comprising 2 322 men born in 1920-24 was carried out in 1970-73 at the University Hospital, Uppsala. Untreated subjects with a diastolic BP greater than or equal to 105 mmHg and those already on treatment for hypertension were considered hypertensives. If a BP elevation was verified at a second screening and the patient had no established contact with a physician, he was offered treatment. Thus, 83 men have been followed up for at least 6 years. The overall reduction in SBP after 6 years was 29.0 mmHg and in DBP 19.6 mmHg. Six men have died, four of them from myocardial infarction, five have dropped out for other reasons. The percentage of non-responders (DBP greater than or equal to 105 mmHg) 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 years +/- 3 months after the start of treatment was high, about 20% on the average. On the other hand, when the mean BP for the non-responders at all visits to the hypertension clinic was compared with their pretreatment value, a reduction of 29.3 mmHg in SBP and 17.0 mmHg in DBP was achieved. The results with regard to compliance and BP reduction are encouraging and would seem to justify more widespread screening and treatment.
PubMed ID
7468316 View in PubMed
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C4 null alleles and myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47995
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Apr;143(2):377-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
S. Nityanand
A. Hamsten
H. Lithell
G. Holm
A K Lefvert
Author Affiliation
Immunological Research Unit, Center for Molecular Medicine Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 1999 Apr;143(2):377-81
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alleles
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Complement C4 - analysis - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Genetics, Population
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - genetics
Reference Values
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sampling Studies
Sex Distribution
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The classical risk factors, hypercholesterolemia, smoking, hypertension and diabetes, explain only a part of the epidemiological features of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease. Investigations in the past few years have shown involvement of immunological mechanisms in atherosclerosis. Circulating immune complexes accelerate atherosclerosis both in experimental animal models and in humans. The fourth component of complement (C4) plays an important role in the solubilisation and elimination of immune complexes. C4 consists of two allotypes, C4A and C4B. An earlier report showed an association between C4B null alleles (C4B*Q0) and myocardial infarction and to infarction related mortality. In the present investigation, C4A*Q0 and C4B*Q0 were studied in two population samples. The first (Group I) was a cross sectional study of 100 consecutive males with myocardial infarction before the age of 45 years and 164 population based healthy controls, age and sex matched. The second (Group II) was a nested case control study in which a cohort of 50 year-old males were followed for 20 years for development of myocardial infarction between 50-60 and 60-70 years, and the results compared with those who did not develop MI. We observed no association of homozygous and/or heterozygous C4A*Q0 or C4B*Q0 with myocardial infarction occurring in the age groups 0.05). The prevalence/frequency of C4A*Q0 and C4B*Q0 was not related to the age at which MI occurred. The prevalence of C4A*Q0 was not affected by age. We thus conclude that partial deficiency of C4 does not appear to be a major risk factor for myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
10217367 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors in treated hypertensives--a nation-wide, cross-sectional study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48552
Source
J Intern Med. 1993 Mar;233(3):239-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
P. Nilsson
D K Andersson
P E Andersson
A. Schwan
B. Ostlind
R. Malmborg
H. Lithell
O K Andersson
Author Affiliation
Health Sciences Centre, Lund University, Dalby, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1993 Mar;233(3):239-45
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood pressure
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Complications
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - complications - epidemiology
Hypertension - blood - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Lipids - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
Hypertensive patients still face a considerable risk of cardiovascular disease in spite of drug treatment in many studies. This may partly be explained by metabolic disturbances, both primarily linked to hypertension but also secondarily influenced by anti-hypertensive drugs themselves. In order to evaluate residual cardiovascular risk factors we investigated 1915 treated hypertensives (912 males, 1003 females) attending 128 health centres from all parts of Sweden. Mean blood pressure was 148/91 mmHg for males and 151/90 for females, but a substantial proportion of all patients were not well controlled, having a diastolic blood pressures > or = 100 mmHg (17% males, 12% females). Total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol were 6.03 and 1.25 mmol l-1 for males, and 6.40 and 1.50 for females. The corresponding figures for serum triglycerides were 2.03 and 1.72 mmol l-1, respectively. In all, 38% of the hypertensives had hypercholesterolaemia (> or = 6.5 mmol l-1) and 27% hypertriglyceridaemia (> or = 2.3 mmol l-1). The lipid/lipoprotein findings may also be influenced by the various anti-hypertensive drugs used in Sweden. The prevalence of smoking and diabetes mellitus were 25% and 11% for men, and for women 24% and 9%. In conclusion, Swedish hypertensives show evidence of significant residual cardiovascular risk factors in spite of treatment. This may be of importance for future relative and absolute cardiovascular risk. It is time to re-evaluate the effectiveness of our management and care of hypertensive patients.
PubMed ID
8450292 View in PubMed
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Cerivastatin gender effect: sub-analyses of results from a multinational, randomised, double-blind study. Cerivastatin Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197917
Source
Curr Med Res Opin. 2000;16(2):80-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
L. Ose
O. Luurila
J. Eriksson
A. Olsson
H. Lithell
B. Widgren
Author Affiliation
Lipid Clinic, Medical Department, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. leiv.ose@rh.uio.no
Source
Curr Med Res Opin. 2000;16(2):80-7
Date
2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Anticholesteremic Agents - pharmacology
Cholesterol, HDL - drug effects
Cholesterol, LDL - drug effects
Double-Blind Method
Female
Finland
Great Britain
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Pyridines - pharmacology
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Abstract
We previously reported the results of a multicentre, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study comparing the efficacy and safety of cerivastatin 0.4 mg/day and cerivastatin 0.2 mg/day in patients with primary hypercholesterolaemia. Exploratory analysis in this study suggested a gender difference in the 0.4 mg group: mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) decreased by 44.4 +/- 8.9% in women, compared with a mean decrease of 37.0 +/- 0.9% in men (p 40%, compared with 38.0% (n = 76) of men taking the same dose. In the cerivastatin 0.2 mg PP population, 34% (n = 17) of women had an LDL-C decrease of > 40%, compared with 19% (n = 18) of men. Mean LDL-C/HDL-C ratio decreased by 43% from baseline to the end of the study in the cerivastatin 0.4 mg PP group: -41.3% in males vs. -48.3% in females. In the cerivastatin 0.2 mg group, the decrease in LDL-C/HDL-C ratio from baseline to endpoint did not markedly differ between genders: -37.0% for males vs. -37.3% for females. Categorial analysis of the LDL-C/HDL-C ratio found that 90% of PP patients taking cerivastatin 0.4 mg, and 84% of PP patients taking cerivastatin 0.2 mg, had a low CHD risk (defined as a LDL-C/HDL-C ratio
PubMed ID
10893651 View in PubMed
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Cognitive function, vascular risk factors and education. A cross-sectional study based on a cohort of 70-year-old men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48146
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Oct;242(4):313-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
L. Kilander
H. Nyman
M. Boberg
H. Lithell
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1997 Oct;242(4):313-21
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - etiology - psychology
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diabetes Complications
Educational Status
Fibrinogen - metabolism
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - complications
Male
Obesity - complications
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A low level of education is associated with an increased risk of developing a dementia disorder, as well as with a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between education and cardiovascular risk factors, and to study the relation between these factors and cognitive function in elderly men. DESIGN: Cross-sectional population-based study. SETTING: Uppsala, Sweden. SUBJECTS: 504 men aged 69-74 years, participants in a longitudinal health survey concerning cardiovascular risk factors. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Cognitive function as measured by a composite score of 13 standard psychometric tests. RESULTS: A low level of education was associated with poorer cognitive performance, as well as with obesity, smoking, diabetes, high concentrations of serum triglycerides and plasma fibrinogen. In the entire cohort, subjects with obesity, smoking, diabetes or hypertriglyceridaemia showed impaired cognitive test results, independent of socio-economic factors. When stroke cases were excluded, obesity and smoking were still related to impaired cognitive function. CONCLUSIONS: Smoking and obesity with associated metabolic disturbances are inversely related both to educational level and to cognitive function. Cognitive decline of vascular origin is potentially preventable by treatment of risk factors. The question of whether the increased vascular risk contributes to the higher prevalence of cognitive disorders in individuals with low socio-economic status, needs to be further evaluated in longitudinal population-based studies.
PubMed ID
9366810 View in PubMed
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Comparison of effects of quinapril and metoprolol on glycaemic control, serum lipids, blood pressure, albuminuria and quality of life in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus patients with hypertension. Swedish Quinapril Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10708
Source
J Intern Med. 1998 Aug;244(2):95-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
J. Ostman
K. Asplund
T. Bystedt
B. Dahlöf
S. Jern
T. Kjellström
H. Lithell
Author Affiliation
Centre of Metabolism and Endocrinology, Huddinge University Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1998 Aug;244(2):95-107
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - pharmacology
Aged
Albuminuria - etiology
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - pharmacology
Antihypertensive Agents - pharmacology
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
C-Peptide - blood
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - complications
Double-Blind Method
Female
Glucose Tolerance Test
Hemoglobin A - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - blood - complications - drug therapy
Insulin - blood
Isoquinolines - pharmacology
Lipids - blood
Male
Metoprolol - pharmacology
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Tetrahydroisoquinolines
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare the long-term effects of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitor quinapril and the cardioselective beta-adrenergic blocking agent metoprolol on glycaemic control, with glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) as the principal variable, in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) patients with hypertension. DESIGN: A randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, multicentre study during 6 months preceded by a 4 week wash-out and a 3 week run-in placebo period. Quinapril (20 mg) and metoprolol (100 mg, conventional tablets) were given once daily. No change was made in the treatment of diabetes (diet and hypoglycaemic agents). SUBJECTS: Seventy-two patients fulfilling the criteria were randomized and entered the double-blind period. Twelve patients did not complete the study. Sixty patients, 26 on quinapril and 34 on metoprolol, were available for the final analysis. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The effect was assessed by changes in HbA1c, the fasting serum glucose and the post-load serum glucose, C-peptide and insulin levels during the oral glucose tolerance test. RESULTS: In the quinapril group, the fasting serum glucose, oral glucose tolerance and the C-peptide and insulin responses, determined as the incremental area under the curves (AUC), showed no change, but the mean HbA1c level increased from 6.2 +/- 1.1% to 6.5 +/- 1.3% (P
PubMed ID
10095796 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.