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Alcohol intemperance and social disability as risk factors for different causes of death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12689
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1986;220(4):351-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1986
Author
H. Aberg
H. Lithell
I. Selinus
H. Hedstrand
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1986;220(4):351-9
Date
1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Follow-Up Studies
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Neoplasms - mortality
Risk
Social Problems
Sweden
Abstract
At a follow-up 7-10 years after a health screening of 50-year-old men in Uppsala, 101 of the 2322 participants and 51 of the 446 non-participants had died. The incidence was thus almost three times as high among non-participants as among participants. Registration at the Temperance Board and/or the Bureau of Social Services was 2-3 times more common among the deceased subjects than among the living irrespective of participation in the health screening. A multiple logistic analysis revealed that non-participation and both types of registration were associated with an increased risk of death. For death from neoplasm only registration at the Bureau of Social Services, and not that at the Temperance Board, was a risk factor. For ischaemic heart disease (IHD), on the other hand, registration at the Temperance Board was the strongest risk factor, the other type of registration being secondary, and non-participation in the screening was a non-significant risk factor. The importance of alcohol intemperance as a risk factor for IHD was reflected in the fact that every second subject dying a sudden death (classified as IHD death) was registered at the Temperance Board. These results indicate that alcohol intemperance entails an increased risk of developing fatal complications to IHD, and social disability may carry with it a risk of both neoplasm and, to a lesser extent, death from IHD.
PubMed ID
3799240 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intemperance and sudden death.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12582
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Jun 6;294(6585):1456-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-6-1987
Author
H. Lithell
H. Aberg
I. Selinus
H. Hedstrand
Source
Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1987 Jun 6;294(6585):1456-8
Date
Jun-6-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications
Blood pressure
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Death, Sudden - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Risk
Sweden
Abstract
Ten years after a health screening examination was offered to 50 year old men 32 of the 2322 participants and 12 of the 454 nonparticipants had died of ischaemic heart disease. Of these, 26 and 11 respectively had suffered sudden death, for which necropsy was performed. Half of the men who had died suddenly had been registered for alcohol intemperance up to 1973, which was four times the prevalence of such registrations in the general population. Registration at both the Swedish Temperance Board and the Bureau of Social Services was associated with an odds ratio of 3.74 for sudden death as compared with not being registered at either. Logistic analysis including the classical risk factors for ischaemic heart disease together with registration for alcohol intemperance and at the Bureau of Social Services showed only the two types of registration and systolic blood pressure to be independent risk factors. On the other hand, there was no overrepresentation of subjects entered in the registers among those surviving a myocardial infarction. For non-fatal myocardial infarction blood pressure and serum triglyceride concentration were significant risk factors and serum cholesterol concentration, smoking, and body mass index probable risk factors; the two types of registration were not independent risk factors. Alcohol intemperance is strongly associated with an increased risk of sudden death after myocardial infarction.
PubMed ID
3111584 View in PubMed
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Anaemia in middle-aged men. Prevalence and aetiology in a population study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75292
Source
Scand J Haematol. 1977 Nov;19(5):417-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1977
Author
H. Hedstrand
A. Killander
Source
Scand J Haematol. 1977 Nov;19(5):417-23
Date
Nov-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anemia - epidemiology - etiology
Hematocrit
Humans
Iron - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Sweden
Abstract
A health examination survey showed that 5.7% of 2322 middle-aged men had a haematocrit value below 40%. Only 1.2% had two consecutive low values. 14 men had no bone marrow haemosiderin and increased their haematocrits following iron therapy. In 13 men with no cause of the anaemia detected there was also a significant increase in haematocrit following therapy. The true prevalence of iron deficiency anaemia in this population may be estimated to about 1%.
PubMed ID
594658 View in PubMed
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Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS I) in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32374
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2001 Feb;54(2):211-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2001
Author
A G Myhre
M. Halonen
P. Eskelin
O. Ekwall
H. Hedstrand
F. Rorsman
O. Kämpe
E S Husebye
Author Affiliation
Division of Endocrinology, Institute of Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Anne.Myhre@med.uib.no
Source
Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2001 Feb;54(2):211-7
Date
Feb-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aromatic-L-Amino-Acid Decarboxylases - immunology
Autoantibodies - blood
Child
Child, Preschool
Cholesterol Side-Chain Cleavage Enzyme - immunology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Ovarian Failure, Premature - immunology
Polyendocrinopathies, Autoimmune - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Steroid 21-Hydroxylase - immunology
Transcription Factors - genetics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate Norwegian patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS I), with respect to occurrence and clinical presentation, reactivity towards different autoantigenes and mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. PATIENTS: Twenty Norwegian patients from 15 families with APS I (11 males, nine females; mean age 26 years, range 4--54) were included by contacting all major hospitals in Norway. METHODS: Clinical data was collected from both patients and their physicians by the use of questionnaires and patient records. Autoantibodies were analysed using radioimmunoassays based on antigen synthesized by in vitro transcription and translation. AIRE mutations were determined by DNA sequence analysis. RESULTS: The prevalence of APS I in Norway was estimated to be about 1 : 80,000 individuals. We found about the same distribution of disease characteristics as has been reported in Finnish patients. The diagnosis was delayed in many individuals. In two thirds of the cases, the patients were admitted in Hospital with acute adrenal insufficiency or hypocalcaemic crisis. Forty percent of these patients already had one of the main disease manifestations. Four different mutations in the AIRE gene were found in the Norwegian cohort. A 13-bp deletion in exon 8 (1085--1097(del)) was the most frequent mutation, present in 22/40 (55%) of the alleles. Eighty-five percent of the patients had either autoantibodies against 21 hydroxylase or aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase. Five of eight women (age > 13 years) had ovarian failure, and all of these had antibodies against side-chain cleavage enzyme (P = 0.0002). CONCLUSION: Norwegian patients with APS I clinically resemble patients from Finland and other European countries. The diagnosis APS I must be considered in children and adolescents with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, autoimmune adrenocortical failure or hypoparathyroidism in order to avoid fatal complications. Analysis of autoantibodies and mutational analysis of the AIRE gene are valuable diagnostic tools, especially in the early stages of the disease.
Notes
Comment In: Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2001 Apr;54(4):433-511318777
PubMed ID
11207636 View in PubMed
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Calcium, phosphate and albumin in serum. A population study with special reference to renal stone formers and the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75298
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1977 Jan;201(1-2):23-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1977
Author
S. Ljunghall
H. Hedstrand
K. Hellsing
L. Wibell
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1977 Jan;201(1-2):23-30
Date
Jan-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Calcium - blood
Humans
Hypercalcemia - epidemiology
Hyperparathyroidism - blood - epidemiology
Kidney Calculi - blood - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Phosphates - blood
Reference Values
Seasons
Serum Albumin - analysis
Sweden
Abstract
Serum valuse for calcium, phosphate and albumin have been determined in a population study of 2322 49-50-year-old men participating in a health examination survey. Calcium and albumin were significantly correlated (r = 0.34) but adjustment for albumin only caused minor effects on the distribution of calcium. No inverse relationship was found between calcium and phosphate. Seasonal variations over the three years of the health survey could not be established for either calcium or phosphate, whereas there was a slight tendency for albumin to decline during summer. The prevalence of hyperparathyroidism (HPT) in this population of men up to the age of 50 was 0.3% and among those with recurrent renal stones 5.3%. All subjects with verified HPT had a history of recurrent renal stones. One man on thiazide treatment had a slight elevation of calcium which returned to normal after cessation of the drug. No other case of hypercalcemia besides those caused by HPT was found. Mean values and frequency distributions for calcium, phosphate and albumin were almost identical in renal stone formers and matched controls. Hence it seems likely that other factors than those which markedly affect serum levels of calcium and phosphate are of major importance in common renal stone formation.
PubMed ID
835367 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk factors and hearing loss. A study of 1,000 fifty-year-old men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68156
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1975 May-Jun;79(5-6):366-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Drettner
H. Hedstrand
I. Klockhoff
A. Svedberg
Source
Acta Otolaryngol. 1975 May-Jun;79(5-6):366-71
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Audiometry
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Deafness - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Noise
Risk
Smoking
Social Class
Sweden
Abstract
The hypothesis that cardiovascular risk factors might be of importance in the development of sensori-neural hearing loss was tested in a material of 1000 fifty-year-old men. No significant correlations were found. The present study confirmed the well-known observation that the left ear usually is poorer than the right. Hearing loss in the right ear was found to be related to the smoking habits in the groups with no history of noise exposure. The explanation for this is discussed. Hearing loss was more common in social class 3 than in the other social classes. This difference was principally referable to noise exposure but also to conductive hearing loss. A prospective study of this material will further analyze the question concerning a possible relationship between cardiovascular risk factors and hearing loss.
PubMed ID
1155046 View in PubMed
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[Changes in smoking habits in men over 50-years-old in Uppsala]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68176
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Aug 8;70(32):2761-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-8-1973
Author
H. Hedstrand
U. Waern
Source
Lakartidningen. 1973 Aug 8;70(32):2761-2
Date
Aug-8-1973
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Male
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden
PubMed ID
4786046 View in PubMed
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Detection and characterization of hyperlipoproteinaemia in middle-aged men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68151
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1976;81(3):159-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
1976
Author
H. Hedstrand
B. Vessby
Source
Ups J Med Sci. 1976;81(3):159-66
Date
1976
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Blood pressure
Body Weight
Cardiovascular Diseases - genetics - mortality
Exertion
Humans
Hyperlipidemia - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Insulin - blood
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Marriage
Middle Aged
Smoking
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
Serum lipoprotein (LP) concentrations were determined and LP patterns were classified in 261 middle-aged men, recruited from a health examination survey, with serum lipid values above the 80th percentile of the same population. Individuals with hyperlipoproteinaemia (HLP) and normolipidaemic controls were characterized also regarding family history of cardiovascular disease, socio-economic factors and clinical and laboratory variables. Subjects with HLP type IV-V and IIB were overweight and showed hyperuricaemia and hyperinsulinaemia compared with normolipidaemic controls and subjects with HLP type IIA. The latter showed elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. In spite of being overweight, subjects with HLP type III showed normal fasting values of insulin and uric acid in serum and normal early insulin response to intravenous glucose. The glucose tolerance did not differ significantly between the groups. Men with HLP types IV-V had predominantly sedentary occupations, in contrast to those with type IIA. There were significantly more smokers in the groups with HLP type IIB and IV-V than in the control group. Thus, individuals with different types of HLP tend to show different metabolic profiles but also different socioeconomic and clinical patterns, suggesting that exogenous factors are of importance in the expression of the LP abnormalities.
PubMed ID
1014165 View in PubMed
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Epidemiology of renal stones in a middle-aged male population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252190
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1975 Jun;197(6):439-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1975
Author
S. Ljunghall
H. Hedstrand
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1975 Jun;197(6):439-45
Date
Jun-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Humans
Kidney Calculi - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Sweden
Urban Population
Abstract
The natural history of upper urinary tract stones has been studied retrospectively in 49-50 year-old men in an urban population. The prevalence of stones in 2322 men was found to be 13.7%, with the highest incidence of onset of the disease during fifth decade. Recurrences had occurred in 42% of all cases, the frequency increasing with observation time. On some occasion 23% of the patients had been admitted to hospital and 12.3% had been operated on, 94.5% of all stones passed spontaneously. A family history of kidney stones was significantly more common in stone patients than in healthy controls, and patients with a family history of stones were more prone to early and repeated recurrences. It is suggested that the raised incidence of stone disease in some families may be attributed to environmental rather than genetic factors. This could be of importance for prophylaxis. Analysis of hospital admission rates supported previous findings of a steady rise in stone incidence. The advantages of population studies for comparative analyses are pointed out.
PubMed ID
1155218 View in PubMed
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27 records – page 1 of 3.