Skip header and navigation

Refine By

18 records – page 1 of 2.

[A computerized system for regional management of incidents is now tested. A complement to the Lex Maria system, indicates unobserved risks].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202999
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Feb 3;96(5):486-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-3-1999

Alcohol consumption and stroke mortality. 20-year follow-up of 15,077 men and women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11349
Source
Stroke. 1995 Oct;26(10):1768-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
H. Hansagi
A. Romelsjö
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
S. Andréasson
A. Leifman
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institute, Psychiatric Clinic for Alcohol and Drug Dependence, St Göran's Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Stroke. 1995 Oct;26(10):1768-73
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcoholic Intoxication - epidemiology
Brain Ischemia - mortality
Cerebral Hemorrhage - mortality
Cerebrovascular Disorders - mortality
Cohort Studies
Ethanol - administration & dosage - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Temperance
Twin Studies
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Since stroke is a principal cause of death in elderly people, we analyzed the association between alcohol and stroke mortality in a cohort of 15,077 middle-aged and older men and women. METHODS: Data on alcohol habits were obtained from a questionnaire in 1967. The subsequent 20 years yielded 769 deaths from stroke, of which 574 were ischemic. Relative mortality risks (RR) were estimated from logistic regression analyses with lifelong alcohol abstainers as a reference group. Adjustments were made for age and smoking. RESULTS: No association was found between alcohol intake and hemorrhagic stroke. An elevated risk of ischemic stroke was found for men who drank infrequently, that is, a few times a year or less often (RR, 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 3.2), for those who were intoxicated now and then (RR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.8), and for those who reported "binge" drinking a few times in the year or less often (RR, 1.6; 95% CI, 1.1 to 2.5). Among women only ex-drinkers had an elevated risk of dying of ischemic stroke (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5 to 7.2). The risk was reduced for women who had an estimated average consumption of 0 to 5 g pure alcohol per day (RR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.8); for those who did not drink every day (RR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9); and for those who never "went on a binge" (RR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.8) or became intoxicated (RR, 0.7; 95% CI, 0.5 to 0.9). CONCLUSIONS: Drinking habits were associated only with deaths from ischemic stroke, and the risk patterns were different for men and women. In analyses, ex-drinkers should not be included with lifelong abstainers, since the former tend to run high health risk.
PubMed ID
7570723 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A survey of "heavy consumers" of emergency care services in Stockholm. Six per cent of the patients accounted for a quarter of emergency consultations]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33562
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Nov 18;95(47):5320, 5323-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-18-1998
Author
H. Hansagi
M. Olsson
S. Sjöberg
Author Affiliation
Beroendecentrum Nord, Sabbatsberg, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1998 Nov 18;95(47):5320, 5323-4
Date
Nov-18-1998
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child, Preschool
Continuity of Patient Care
Emergency Service, Hospital - statistics & numerical data - utilization
English Abstract
Female
Health Services Misuse
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Care Planning
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A small subgroup of patients accounts for a substantial proportion of emergency room (ER) consultations. Of the 479,956 consultations at ER facilities at Stockholm hospitals in 1996, a quarter were accounted for by six per cent of the patients, a subgroup characterised by at least four ER consultations during the year. Some 1,500 patients consulted 12-233 times. Analysis of the care-seeking habits of five extremely heavy ER-facility consumers showed them also to be heavy consumers of other health care services such as primary and tertiary facilities. Since previous studies have shown heavy ER-facility consumers to be a vulnerable subgroup both medically and socially, co-ordination and planning of their care might well be beneficial.
PubMed ID
9855732 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Emergency departments are more popular among elderly patients than among young ones].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225196
Source
Lakartidningen. 1991 Dec 18;88(51-52):4419-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-18-1991

[Emergency health services. Partnership of patient and patient care team].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192681
Source
Lakartidningen. 2001 Oct 3;98(40):4323-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-2001

Frequency of emergency department attendances as a predictor of mortality: nine-year follow-up of a population-based cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12221
Source
J Public Health Med. 1990 Feb;12(1):39-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1990
Author
H. Hansagi
P. Allebeck
O. Edhag
G. Magnusson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Public Health Med. 1990 Feb;12(1):39-44
Date
Feb-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Cause of Death
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Probability
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Heavy users of the services of emergency departments (EDs) have in previous studies been found to have psychological, social, economic and other difficulties besides their more or less acute medical problems. In order to establish whether mortality is associated with high ED use, a nine-year follow-up study was conducted of a 10 per cent population sample (n = 17,000), selected from the catchment area of Huddinge Hospital, Sweden. ED visits were found to predict nine-year mortality in the cohort. The group of individuals who had made four or more ED visits during a period of 15 months prior to follow-up (heavy ED users) had a two-fold excess mortality (95 per cent confidence interval (CI) = 1.9-2.1), those who had made one to three ED visits (moderate ED users) had a slightly elevated mortality (standardized mortality ratio SMR = 1.1, 95 per cent CI = 1.0-1.3), while the SMR of the non-users was 0.9 (95 per cent CI = 0.8-1.0). The three predominant causes of death in the cohort were diseases in the circulatory system, tumours and violent death. Heavy ED users had elevated mortality in all diagnoses, the most important excess mortality being from violent death, comprising suicide, probable suicide and alcohol/drug abuse, with an SMR of 6.3 (95 per cent CI = 6.0-6.7). The excess mortality from these causes of the heavy ED users accounted for more than one-third of their total excess mortality.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
2390308 View in PubMed
Less detail

Frequent use of the hospital emergency department is indicative of high use of other health care services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32152
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2001 Jun;37(6):561-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
H. Hansagi
M. Olsson
S. Sjöberg
Y. Tomson
S. Göransson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. helen.hansagi@cspo.sll.se
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 2001 Jun;37(6):561-7
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Ambulatory Care - utilization
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Databases, Factual
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Health status
Hospitals, Public - utilization
Hospitals, University - utilization
Hospitals, Urban - utilization
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Needs Assessment
Odds Ratio
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Primary Health Care - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
STUDY OBJECTIVE: We sought to determine the proportion of emergency department patients who frequently use the ED and to compare their frequency of use of other health care services at non-ED sites. METHODS: A computerized patient database covering all ambulatory visits and hospital admissions at all care facilities in the county of Stockholm, Sweden, was used. Frequent ED patients were defined as those making 4 or more visits in a 12-month period. RESULTS: Frequent users comprised 4% of total ED patients, accounting for 18% of the ED visits. The ED was the only source of ambulatory care for 13% of frequent versus 27% of rare ED users (1 ED visit). Primary care visits were made by 72% of frequent ED users versus 57% by rare ED visitors. The corresponding figures for hospital admission were 80% and 36%, respectively. Frequent ED visitors were also more likely to use other care facilities repeatedly: their odds ratio (adjusted for age and sex) was 3.43 (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.10 to 3.78) for 5 or more primary care visits and 29.98 (95% CI 26.33 to 34.15) for 5 or more hospital admissions. In addition, heavy users had an elevated mortality (standardized mortality ratio 1.55; 95% CI 1.26 to 1.90). CONCLUSION: High ED use patients are also high users of other health care services, presumably because they are sicker than average. A further indication of serious ill health is their higher than expected mortality. This knowledge might be helpful for care providers in their endeavors to find appropriate ways of meeting the needs of this vulnerable patient category.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Emerg Med. 2001 Jun;37(6):627-911385331
Comment In: Ann Emerg Med. 2002 Jun;39(6):693-512023721
PubMed ID
11385324 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Great interest in registration of incidents. Worry about reporting to HSAN may put a brake on it].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211253
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Aug 28;93(35):2928-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1996
Author
R. Westerling
H. Hansagi
P O Osterman
D K Andersson
J. Ahlfeldt
K. Svärdsudd
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för socialmedicin, Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Aug 28;93(35):2928-30
Date
Aug-28-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Humans
Malpractice
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Questionnaires
Registries
Sweden
PubMed ID
8815351 View in PubMed
Less detail

Health care utilization after referral from a hospital emergency department.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73924
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1989;17(4):291-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1989
Author
H. Hansagi
P. Allebeck
O. Edhag
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1989;17(4):291-9
Date
1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Health Services - utilization
Health Services Misuse
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Primary Health Care
Referral and Consultation
Sweden
Abstract
In a trial, patients who came to a hospital Emergency Department (ED) with non-urgent complaints were advised and referred to primary health care outside the hospital. The effect of this was assessed by measuring health care utilization one year before and one year after the referral, using the Stockholm County computerized medical information system and ED medical records. The proportion of the 189 referred patients who visited the ED decreased from 48% to 42%, whereas in a control group of 107 patients the proportion increased from 41% to 51%. A small proportion, 7%, of the referred patients with four or more ED visits accounted for 45% of the total number of ED visits the year before the trial. These frequent ED users did not reduce their ED utilization more than frequent ED users in the control group. The use of health care centres increased in the referred group and was practically unchanged in the control group. However, those referred patients who continued to use the ED still quite often did so for non-urgent complaints.
PubMed ID
2602922 View in PubMed
Less detail

High consumers of health care in emergency units: how to improve their quality of care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68593
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1991;3(1):51-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
H. Hansagi
O. Edhag
P. Allebeck
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Qual Assur Health Care. 1991;3(1):51-62
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Counseling - standards
Emergency Service, Hospital - standards - utilization
Follow-Up Studies
Health Services Misuse - statistics & numerical data
Health Services Research
Hospital Bed Capacity, 500 and over
Humans
Primary Health Care - organization & administration - standards
Quality Assurance, Health Care - organization & administration
Referral and Consultation
Sweden
Abstract
Patients with non-urgent complaints and/or who attend frequently account for a substantial portion of the visits to emergency units. These patients usually require other types of care than that provided by a highly specialized emergency department (ED). In this paper we describe the development of ED utilization in the catchment area of Huddinge University Hospital, and the attempts made to improve the quality of care for high consumers of ED care. In a trial, nurse's advice and referral proved to be a feasible means of referring patients with non-urgent complaints from the hospital emergency department to more appropriate care sources, such as primary health care centres. A long-term follow-up showed that without any intervention, frequent ED users are a high-risk group as regards morbidity and mortality, especially with respect to suicide. Prevention with comprehensive and continuous treatment programmes should therefore be planned when a tendency is noted for patients to attend the ED frequently.
PubMed ID
1873530 View in PubMed
Less detail

18 records – page 1 of 2.