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11 records – page 1 of 2.

Assessment of rehabilitation technologies in stroke. Outcomes and costs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73096
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):245-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
U. Hass
J. Persson
H. Brodin
I. Fredén-Karlsson
J E Olsson
I. Berg
Author Affiliation
Linköping University.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):245-61
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cerebrovascular Disorders - economics - rehabilitation
Confidence Intervals
Costs and Cost Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outcome and Process Assessment (Health Care) - economics - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Technology Assessment, Biomedical
Abstract
Initial functional ability (Barthel Index, mean 57) was found to be an important predictor of functional ability 1 year after stroke (mean 80) and for costs during the period. On average the total cost for a stroke patient was about SEK 200,000; the main expense, accommodation, averaged about SEK 140,000, while assistive devices amounted to SEK 2,600. Those who use assistive devices, although having achieved a high functional ability, perceive and rate their life situation (Nottingham Health Profile) considerably more impaired than those without assistive devices.
PubMed ID
7790168 View in PubMed
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Assistive technology selection: a study of participation of users with rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14240
Source
IEEE Trans Rehabil Eng. 1997 Sep;5(3):263-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
U. Hass
H. Brodin
A. Andersson
J. Persson
Author Affiliation
Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
IEEE Trans Rehabil Eng. 1997 Sep;5(3):263-75
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - rehabilitation
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Orthotic Devices
Patient Participation
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Self-Help Devices
Abstract
A new program based on improved user participation for the selection of assistive devices was implemented and its effectiveness and efficiency assessed. The intervention was compared with traditional routines. The study population comprised persons with rheumatoid arthritis who lived in two communities in Sweden. The selection process yielded increased user participation, user satisfaction, an increased number of prescriptions, and consequently also higher costs. The outcome measures showed more vague improvements. No improvement in functional ability was found regarding pain and difficulty with daily activities in the two study groups, but an increased use of assistive devices was found among women below 64 years in the intervention group (p = 0.001). Women below 64 years in the intervention group rated an improved health-related quality of life regarding both the total score (p = 0.017) and the underlying dimensions of physical function (p = 0.012). Even though the intervention yielded positive results on process-variables as increased user participation and an increased number of prescribed assistive devices, only women below 64 years showed an increased use of assistive devices in daily activities and an improved health related quality of life.
PubMed ID
9292292 View in PubMed
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[A WORK GUIDE FOR MEDICAL GYMNASTICS IN PRIVATE PRACTICE.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50513
Source
Sven Lakartidn. 1964 Mar 25;61:1059-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-25-1964
Author
H. BRODIN
Source
Sven Lakartidn. 1964 Mar 25;61:1059-60
Date
Mar-25-1964
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Exercise Therapy
Gymnastics
Sweden
PubMed ID
14138043 View in PubMed
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Changes in hospital costs for an appendectomy: 1955, 1965, and 1975.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241621
Source
Am J Surg. 1983 Sep;146(3):342-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1983
Author
E. Arnbjörnsson
S. Bengmark
H. Brodin
B. Lindgren
B G Petersson
R. Sörbris
Source
Am J Surg. 1983 Sep;146(3):342-5
Date
Sep-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appendectomy - economics
Hospitalization - economics
Humans
Length of Stay - economics
Sweden
Abstract
A reduction in the number of postoperative bed days for patients who underwent appendectomy led to a study of changes in hospital costs of appendectomies for the years 1955, and 1965, and 1975. No significant changes were found in the total hospital costs. However, the postoperative costs decreased by 36 percent from 1955 to 1975 due to a decrease in the mean duration of hospital stay. During the same period of time, the perioperative costs increased by (table; see text) 90 percent due to increased length of operation time correlated with an increasing proportion of inexperienced operating surgeons. At present, there seem to be few possible ways to increase the cost efficiency of treating appendicitis.
PubMed ID
6614324 View in PubMed
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Cost analysis of different phases of acute myeloid leukaemia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23516
Source
Leuk Res. 1994 Oct;18(10):783-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
A M Stalfelt
H. Brodin
B. Wadman
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Orebro Medical Center Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Leuk Res. 1994 Oct;18(10):783-90
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cost of Illness
Costs and Cost Analysis
Episode of Care
Female
Health Care Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Leukemia, Myeloid - economics - mortality - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life
Recurrence
Remission Induction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Priority lists have been formulated in several countries and cut-backs can be a threat to leukaemia treatment. We analysed the costs in different phases of disease for 54 conventionally treated patients with acute myeloid leukaemia. Thirty-two patients reached CR 1, seven patients are still alive as of May 1994. We found a cost per week and patient of 17,334 Swedish Crowns (SEK) (U.K. 1 pound = 10.57 and U.S. $1 = 5.91, 1990) in induction phase, 1854 in remission phase and 10,529 SEK in relapse phase. In the terminal phase 10% of the total cost was spent. The quality of life of the patients in relapse is discussed and palliative treatment is emphasized.
PubMed ID
7934137 View in PubMed
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Costs over time in conventional treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia. A study exploring changes in treatment strategies over two decades.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23517
Source
J Intern Med. 1994 Oct;236(4):401-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1994
Author
A M Stalfelt
H. Brodin
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 1994 Oct;236(4):401-9
Date
Oct-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Combined Modality Therapy - economics
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Leukemia, Myeloid - economics - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Oncology Service, Hospital - economics
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Survival Analysis
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
OBJECTIVES. The aim was to analyse the consumption of different items in conventional treatment of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and their cost, in order to evaluate the economic consequences of new treatment strategies. DESIGN. Data on items of treatment were gathered retrospectively from case notes, including amount and date. Prices were gathered from price lists made up for internal billing/accounting. SETTING. The patients were all treated in a hospital with excellent treatment and service facilities. SUBJECTS. Seventy-three AML patients treated from 1973 to 1980, all since deceased, were compared with 54 patients treated from 1981 to 1988, of whom 14 were alive at the end of the observation period. INTERVENTIONS. The patients were treated according to randomized treatment protocols to achieve complete remission. Maintenance treatment or consolidation courses were given. In relapse, new induction treatment was given. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. Complete remission and survival were registered. The costs were divided into basic hospital costs and patient-specific costs. RESULTS. The mean total treatment cost for an AML patient in the 1970s was 211,138 SEK, and in 1980s 356,911 SEK. (UK 1 pound = 10.57 SEK, US$1 = 5.91 SEK 1990). All treatment costs increased between the periods: hospital costs by 20%, and patient-specific costs by 186%. Antibiotics, cytostatics and outpatient department costs had increased the most. The mean survival time almost doubled, and in the 1980s group there were several long-term survivors. CONCLUSIONS. The costs for AML treatment increased considerably from the 1970s to the 1980s. The effectiveness of these treatments increased as well, resulting in increased rate and duration of survival, and several patients were long-term survivors. It was not possible to identify the cost consequences of separate new technologies.
PubMed ID
7931043 View in PubMed
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Domiciliary liquid oxygen versus concentrator treatment in chronic hypoxaemia: a cost-utility analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72442
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Dec;12(6):1284-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
A. Andersson
K. Ström
H. Brodin
M. Alton
G. Boman
P. Jakobsson
A. Lindberg
M. Uddenfeldt
H. Walter
L A Levin
Author Affiliation
Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Eur Respir J. 1998 Dec;12(6):1284-9
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anoxemia - economics - therapy
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oxygen - economics
Oxygen Inhalation Therapy - economics - methods
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
Whether long-term oxygen therapy (LTOT) improves quality of life in chronic hypoxaemia has been questioned. LTOT with an oxygen concentrator (C/C) and gas cylinders for ambulation is considered cumbersome compared to mobile liquid oxygen equipment (L). The hypothesis for this study was that LTOT with liquid oxygen treatment (L) improves patients' health-related quality of life, but that it is also more expensive compared to concentrator (C/C) treatment. A prospective, randomized multicentre trial comparing C/C with L for LTOT was conducted during a six-month period. Fifty-one patients (29 on L and 22 on C/C) with chronic hypoxaemia, regularly active outside the home, participated in the study initially. Costs for oxygen were obtained from the pharmacies. Patient diaries and telephone contacts with members of the healthcare sector were used to estimate costs. Health-related quality of life was measured by the Sickness Impact Profile (SIP) and the EuroQol, instruments at the start and after 6 months. The average total cost per patient for group C/C for the six-month period was US$1,310, and for group L it was US$4,950. Health-related quality of life measured by the SIP instrument showed significant differences in favour of group L in the categories/dimensions of physical function, body care, ambulation, social interaction and total SIP score. In conclusion, liquid-oxygen treatment was more expensive compared to concentrator treatment. However, treatment effects showed that liquid oxygen had a better impact on quality of life.
PubMed ID
9877478 View in PubMed
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[Medical interests in gymnastics and athletics]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49838
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2001;5(1):107-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
H. Brodin
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2001;5(1):107-16
Date
2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Gymnastics - history
History, Modern 1601-
Hygiene - history
Sports - history
Sweden
Abstract
Since time immemorial authors have noticed the usefulness of physical activity. In the 18th century C von Linné was a spokesman for bodily exercise, and in the beginning of the 19th century P. H . Ling shaped the Swedish gymnastics and founded the Gymnastiska Centralinstitutet in 1813. He aimed at harmonious bodies according to the models of the classic antiquity. Many physicians, I. and F. Holmgren saw the value of the gymnastics. Completing the Ling gymnastics, there was a growing interest in physical performance, i.e., athletics. Above all, the contributions of the officer V. Balck, culminating at the olympic games in Stockholm 1912, made athletics a national movement. Since 1913 it receives an annual economic support from the state. Some physicians feared from overexertion in athletics but they appreciated physical performance. However, they demanded that you should be wholly full-grown prior to great exortions. An important part of the Ling program was remedial gymnastics which was more and more estimated after P. Haglund had asserted its value. T. Sjöstrand's studies became a good basis for evaluating the effect of physical training in both healthy and sick persons. It was not until the 1950s that the first studies, later confirmed, gave holds for the view that physical training was good for public health. But the average life span does not seem to be influenced by physical activities. Now and then training had earlier been used as therapy for disparate sorts of diseases but most rationally for disturbed functions of the locomotor system. Training became an important part of medical rehabilitation only after the second world war. Gymnastics and athletics at school have always had a solid support by physicians. The subject has nowadays so few hours that it cannot result in safe training habits for the future.
PubMed ID
11820244 View in PubMed
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One-year economic consequences of accidents in a Swedish municipality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34895
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 Mar;28(2):209-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1996
Author
K S Lindqvist
H. Brodin
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University, Sweden.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1996 Mar;28(2):209-19
Date
Mar-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Accidents - economics - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care - economics
Child
Child, Preschool
Costs and Cost Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Expenditures - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Admission - economics
Primary Health Care - economics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Welfare - economics
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - economics - epidemiology
Abstract
The objectives of this study were to develop a system to calculate the economic consequences of accidents and to account for the economic consequences of all accidents during 1 year in a district. A total population injury survey was done in an area with a population of over 41,000. All accidents (N = 4926) occurring within a 12-month period and requiring medical care were noted. The costs (calculated at 1991 prices) to the health care service (outpatient care, including primary health care and hospital care) were SEK 23.7 million (US $3.59 million), to trade and industry SEK 79.7 million (US $12.08 million), and for health insurance SEK 9.1 million (US $1.38 million). The cost for society of uninsured people is not possible to estimate using loss of production. However, the time lost from "normal activities" was registered. If this time is valued at the same price as working hours, a welfare cost of SEK 43.1 million (US $6.53 million) should be added. In a forthcoming paper, an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of interventions against accidents will be published.
PubMed ID
8703279 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Dec 13;92(50):4780
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-13-1995
Author
H. Brodin
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Dec 13;92(50):4780
Date
Dec-13-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back Pain - psychology - rehabilitation
Chronic Disease
Humans
Patient Education as Topic
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 1995 Oct 25;92(43):3987-8, 39917475524
PubMed ID
8538288 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.