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Blastocystis: unravelling potential risk factors and clinical significance of a common but neglected parasite.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151340
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Nov;137(11):1655-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
C R Stensvold
H C Lewis
A M Hammerum
L J Porsbo
S S Nielsen
K E P Olsen
M C Arendrup
H V Nielsen
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, Mycology and Parasitology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. RUN@ssi.dk
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Nov;137(11):1655-63
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Antiparasitic Agents - therapeutic use
Blastocystis - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Blastocystis Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dientamoeba - isolation & purification
Dientamoebiasis - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - parasitology
Male
Metronidazole - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Treatment Failure
Young Adult
Abstract
Two independent studies were conducted to describe symptoms and potential risk factors associated with Blastocystis infection. Isolates were subtyped by molecular analysis. In the NORMAT study (126 individuals randomly sampled from the general population) 24 (19%) were positive for Blastocystis. Blastocystis was associated with irritable bowel syndrome (P=0.04), contact with pigs (P
PubMed ID
19393117 View in PubMed
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A case of trichinellosis in Denmark, imported from Poland, June 2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161362
Source
Euro Surveill. 2007 Aug;12(8):E070809.3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
C R Stensvold
H V Nielsen
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, Mycology and Parasitology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. RUN@ssi.dk
Source
Euro Surveill. 2007 Aug;12(8):E070809.3
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Disease Transmission, Infectious
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Meat Products - parasitology
Middle Aged
Poland - epidemiology
Trichinellosis - epidemiology - transmission
PubMed ID
17868552 View in PubMed
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Clinical/serological outcome in humans bitten by Babesia species positive Ixodes ricinus ticks in Sweden and on the Åland Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311015
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2020 07; 11(4):101455
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
P Wilhelmsson
M Lövmar
K A Krogfelt
H V Nielsen
P Forsberg
P E Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Division of Inflammation and Infection, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Microbiology, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.wilhelmsson@liu.se.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2020 07; 11(4):101455
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Asymptomatic Infections
Babesia - isolation & purification
Babesiosis - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Humans
Ixodes - growth & development - parasitology
Larva - growth & development - parasitology
Male
Middle Aged
Nymph - growth & development - parasitology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The risk of contracting babesiosis after a tick bite in Sweden and on the Åland Islands, Finland, is unknown. We investigated clinical and serological outcomes in people bitten by Ixodes ricinus ticks positive for Babesia species. Ticks, blood and questionnaires were obtained from study participants in Sweden and on the Åland Islands. Sixty-five of 2098 (3.1 %) ticks were positive by real-time PCR. Three Babesia species were detected, Babesia microti (n = 33), B. venatorum (n = 27) and B. capreoli (n = 5), the latter species not known to cause human infection. Half (46 %) of the Babesia PCR-positive ticks also contained Borrelia spp. Fifty-three participants bitten by a Babesia PCR-positive tick and a control group bitten by a Babesia PCR-negative tick were tested for B. microti IgG antibodies by IFA. The overall seroprevalence was 4.4 %, but there was no significant difference between the groups. None of the participants seroconverted and no participant with a Babesia PCR-positive tick sought medical care or reported symptoms suggestive of babesiosis. Given the prevalence of Babesia in I. ricinus ticks in southern Sweden and on the Åland Islands, babesiosis should be considered a possible diagnosis in symptomatic residents who seek medical care following tick exposure.
PubMed ID
32386909 View in PubMed
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Clinical/serological outcome in humans bitten by Babesia species positive Ixodes ricinus ticks in Sweden and on the Åland Islands.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306003
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2020 07; 11(4):101455
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2020
Author
P Wilhelmsson
M Lövmar
K A Krogfelt
H V Nielsen
P Forsberg
P E Lindgren
Author Affiliation
Division of Inflammation and Infection, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden; Department of Clinical Microbiology, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden. Electronic address: peter.wilhelmsson@liu.se.
Source
Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2020 07; 11(4):101455
Date
07-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The risk of contracting babesiosis after a tick bite in Sweden and on the Åland Islands, Finland, is unknown. We investigated clinical and serological outcomes in people bitten by Ixodes ricinus ticks positive for Babesia species. Ticks, blood and questionnaires were obtained from study participants in Sweden and on the Åland Islands. Sixty-five of 2098 (3.1 %) ticks were positive by real-time PCR. Three Babesia species were detected, Babesia microti (n = 33), B. venatorum (n = 27) and B. capreoli (n = 5), the latter species not known to cause human infection. Half (46 %) of the Babesia PCR-positive ticks also contained Borrelia spp. Fifty-three participants bitten by a Babesia PCR-positive tick and a control group bitten by a Babesia PCR-negative tick were tested for B. microti IgG antibodies by IFA. The overall seroprevalence was 4.4 %, but there was no significant difference between the groups. None of the participants seroconverted and no participant with a Babesia PCR-positive tick sought medical care or reported symptoms suggestive of babesiosis. Given the prevalence of Babesia in I. ricinus ticks in southern Sweden and on the Åland Islands, babesiosis should be considered a possible diagnosis in symptomatic residents who seek medical care following tick exposure.
PubMed ID
32386909 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dientamoeba fragilis in Denmark: epidemiological experience derived from four years of routine real-time PCR.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114534
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Oct;32(10):1303-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2013
Author
D. Röser
J. Simonsen
H V Nielsen
C R Stensvold
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Parasitology, Department of Microbiology and Infection Control, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, 2300, Copenhagen S, Denmark, dsr@ssi.dk.
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2013 Oct;32(10):1303-10
Date
Oct-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dientamoeba - genetics - isolation & purification
Dientamoebiasis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Young Adult
Abstract
The intestinal protozoon Dientamoeba fragilis remains a clinical entity of dubious significance. While several previous studies address questions of epidemiology, only a handful have systematically employed and reported on the results from real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), the best currently available diagnostic modality, and the comparison of results from different studies is, therefore, difficult. Since 2007, Statens Serum Institut (Denmark) has utilised qPCR for D. fragilis as routine diagnostic work-up for intestinal parasitosis, testing more than 22,000 samples from 2008 through 2011, and the aim of this study was to report on the results and experiences gained in the process. We demonstrate a staggeringly high proportion (43%) of investigated patients positive for D. fragilis, ranging from 12 to 71% depending on age group, showing a bimodal age distribution peaking in children and adults of parental age, as well as a clear association between exposure to children and risk of D. fragilis infection. We discuss these findings in light of the pinworm egg vector hypothesis and substantiate further our knowledge of risk factors pertaining to D. fragilis carriage.
PubMed ID
23609513 View in PubMed
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A foodborne outbreak of Cryptosporidium hominis infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153243
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Mar;137(3):348-56
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
S. Ethelberg
M. Lisby
L S Vestergaard
H L Enemark
K E P Olsen
C R Stensvold
H V Nielsen
L J Porsbo
A-M Plesner
K. Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, Mycology and Parasitology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. set@ssi.dk
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 2009 Mar;137(3):348-56
Date
Mar-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Cryptosporidiosis - epidemiology
Cryptosporidium - isolation & purification
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Contamination
Food Handling
Food Microbiology
Foodborne Diseases - epidemiology - parasitology
Fruit - parasitology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Questionnaires
Vegetables - parasitology
Abstract
Foodborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis are uncommon. In Denmark human cases are generally infrequently diagnosed. In 2005 an outbreak of diarrhoea affected company employees near Copenhagen. In all 99 employees were reported ill; 13 were positive for Cryptosporidium hominis infection. Two analytical epidemiological studies were performed; an initial case-control study followed by a cohort study using an electronic questionnaire. Disease was associated with eating from the canteen salad bar on one, possibly two, specific weekdays [relative risk 4.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.1-8.3]. Three separate salad bar ingredients were found to be likely sources: peeled whole carrots served in a bowl of water, grated carrots, and red peppers (in multivariate analysis, whole carrots: OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.0; grated carrots: OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2-3.9; peppers: OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.7-6.6). We speculate that a person excreting the parasite may have contaminated the salad buffet.
PubMed ID
19134228 View in PubMed
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History of antimicrobial use and the risk of Dientamoeba fragilis infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269603
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2015 Jun;34(6):1145-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2015
Author
D. Röser
J. Simonsen
H V Nielsen
C R Stensvold
K. Mølbak
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2015 Jun;34(6):1145-51
Date
Jun-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dientamoeba - isolation & purification
Dientamoebiasis - epidemiology
Drug Utilization
Enteritis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Young Adult
Abstract
Associations between antimicrobial use and risk of enteric infection with intestinal protozoa are scarcely studied. The aim of this study was to quantify the risk of Dientamoeba fragilis infection conferred by exposure to antimicrobials. We conducted a registry-based retrospective cohort study of 9,945 Danish patients investigated for D. fragilis infection between 2008 and 2011, using data from the Danish Register of Medicinal Product Statistics, and calculating relative risks (RR) for D. fragilis infection by stratified binary regression. Furthermore, we conducted a population based case-control study using controls sampled from the Danish Civil Registration System, calculating hazard ratios (HR) for D. fragilis infection by conditional logistic regression. Exposure to metronidazole was found to confer decreased risk of D. fragilis infection; however, similar associations were found for antimicrobials not commonly used to treat D. fragilis, such as broad-spectrum penicillin, fluoroquinolones, and macrolides. In contrast, mebendazole exposure was associated with increased risk. The intake of antimicrobials influences the risk of D. fragilis.
PubMed ID
25663130 View in PubMed
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The incidence and clinical symptomatology of Clostridium difficile infections in a community setting in a cohort of Danish patients attending general practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258586
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;33(6):957-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
L M Søes
H M Holt
B. Böttiger
H V Nielsen
M. Torpdahl
E M Nielsen
S. Ethelberg
K. Mølbak
V. Andreasen
M. Kemp
K E P Olsen
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;33(6):957-67
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Toxins - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Clostridium Infections - epidemiology - pathology
Clostridium difficile - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Cohort Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - epidemiology - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diarrhea - epidemiology - pathology
Female
General practice
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Ribotyping
Young Adult
Abstract
Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is gradually being recognised as a cause of morbidity in the community. We investigated the incidence and clinical characteristics of CDI in a community setting and characterised the C. difficile strains by toxin gene profiling and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) ribotyping. Patients included in the study had attended general practice, primarily because of diarrhoea; CDI patients (259 patients; 121 38 °C, weight loss and sick leave. Data were analysed by logistic regression. CDI patients 15 days (59% vs. 73%) as the predominant symptoms. CDI patients =2 years old reported duration of diarrhoea >15 days more often compared to non-CDI patients (73% vs. 27 %, p?
PubMed ID
24352841 View in PubMed
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[Poisoning by kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris)]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75617
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Dec 16;153(51):3628-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1991
Author
M K Tuxen
H V Nielsen
H. Birgens
Author Affiliation
Medicinsk afdeling F og afdeling B, Centralsygehuset Hillerød.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1991 Dec 16;153(51):3628-9
Date
Dec-16-1991
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cookery
English Abstract
Fabaceae - poisoning
Female
Food Poisoning - etiology
Humans
Lectins - poisoning
Male
Plant Lectins
Plants, Medicinal
Risk factors
Abstract
During recent years, numerous new and exotic fruits have become available in Denmark. However, some of these may be potentially hazardous if incorrectly prepared. Some leguminous plants, in particular, contain considerable amounts of toxic lectins. The authors report two persons who developed severe symptoms of poisoning including diarrhoea, vomiting, muscular pain, rhabdomyolysis and toxic myocarditis after consuming raw and insufficiently cooked kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). Meticulous instructions about handling should accompany the sale of potentially hazardous vegetables such as these.
PubMed ID
1776211 View in PubMed
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The prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis in patients with suspected enteroparasitic disease in a metropolitan area in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162664
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2007 Aug;13(8):839-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
C R Stensvold
M C Arendrup
K. Mølbak
H V Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Bacteriology, Mycology and Parasitology, Statens Serum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark. run@ssi.dk
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2007 Aug;13(8):839-42
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Dientamoeba - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Dientamoebiasis - epidemiology
Feces - parasitology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Microbiological Techniques
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Urban Population
Abstract
The prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis in patients from a metropolitan area in Denmark was determined by examination of paired stool samples using two techniques: a formol ethyl-acetate concentration technique with unpreserved faeces and a permanent staining technique on faeces preserved with sodium acetate-acetic acid-formalin (SAF). Using the SAF permanent staining technique and the formol ethyl-acetate concentration technique, 25% and 15% of the specimens, respectively, were parasite-positive. D. fragilis was detected in 12 of the 103 patients, only two of whom harboured other recognised pathogenic parasites. Overall, D. fragilis had a remarkably high prevalence in the metropolitan area of Denmark investigated.
PubMed ID
17610603 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.