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Abacavir and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy: a population-based nationwide cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99479
Source
HIV Med. 2010 Feb;11(2):130-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Niels Obel
D K Farkas
G. Kronborg
C S Larsen
G. Pedersen
A. Riis
C. Pedersen
J. Gerstoft
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, Denmark. niels.obel@rh.regionh.dk
Source
HIV Med. 2010 Feb;11(2):130-6
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anti-HIV Agents - adverse effects
Antiretroviral Therapy, Highly Active
Comorbidity
Denmark - epidemiology
Dideoxynucleosides - adverse effects
Epidemiologic Methods
Female
HIV Infections - drug therapy
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - chemically induced - epidemiology
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine whether exposure to abacavir increases the risk for myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS: This was a prospective nationwide cohort study which included all Danish HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) from 1995 to 2005 (N = 2952). Data on hospitalization for MI and comorbidity were obtained from Danish medical databases. Hospitalization rates for MI after HAART initiation were calculated for patients who used abacavir and those who did not. We used Cox's regression to compute incidence rate ratios (IRR) as a measure of relative risk for MI, while controlling for potential confounders (as separate variables and via propensity score) including comorbidity. MAIN OUTCOME: Relative risk of hospitalization with MI in abacavir users compared with abacavir nonusers. RESULTS: Hospitalization rates for MI were 2.4/1000 person-years (PYR) [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.7-3.4] for abacavir nonusers and 5.7/1000 PYR (95% CI 4.1-7.9) for abacavir users. The risk of MI increased after initiation of abacavir [unadjusted IRR = 2.22 (95% CI 1.31-3.76); IRR adjusted for confounders = 2.00 (95% CI 1.10-3.64); IRR adjusted for propensity score = 2.00 (95% CI 1.07-3.76)]. This effect was also observed among patients initiating abacavir within 2 years after the start of HAART and among patients who started abacavir as part of a triple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) regimen. CONCLUSIONS: We confirmed the association between abacavir use and increased risk of MI. Further studies are needed to control for potential confounding not measured in research to date.
PubMed ID
19682101 View in PubMed
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ABO blood groups and risk of venous thromboembolism during pregnancy and the puerperium. A population-based, nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29941
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2005 Feb;3(2):300-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
T B Larsen
S P Johnsen
M. Gislum
C A I Møller
H. Larsen
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Genetics, Odense University Hospital, Sdr. Boulevard 29, DK-5000 Odense, Denmark. tblarsen@dadlnet.dk
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2005 Feb;3(2):300-4
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
ABO Blood-Group System - physiology
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Odds Ratio
Postpartum Period - blood
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Cardiovascular - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk assessment
Thromboembolism - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Venous Thrombosis - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To examine possible associations of ABO blood types with the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in pregnancy and the puerperium. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study within a cohort of 71,729 women who gave birth to 126,783 children in the North Jutland County, Denmark, from 1980 to 2001. We identified 129 cases with VTE in pregnancy (n = 61) or the puerperium (n = 68), and 258 controls with no VTE. We collected information on ABO blood groups and possible maternal confounding factors and estimated the relative risk [odds ratio (OR)]. RESULTS: Women with an A or AB blood group had elevated risk estimates of VTE in pregnancy or the puerperium compared with women with a O blood group [adjusted ORs 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3, 4.3, and 2.0, 95% CI 0.7, 5.8, respectively]. No increased risk estimate was found for group B (adjusted OR 1.2, 95% CI 0.5, 3.0). The increased risk estimates of VTE for blood groups A and AB appeared present in both pregnancy (adjusted ORs of 3.9, 95% CI 1.5, 9.7, and 2.2, 95% CI 0.4, 12.5) and in the puerperium (adjusted ORs of 2.4, 95% CI 1.0, 4.9 and 2.7, 95% CI 0.8, 9.3). Furthermore, blood groups A and AB appeared to be associated with increased risk estimates for both DVT and pulmonary embolism. CONCLUSION: Keeping the modest statistical precision of our study in mind, blood groups A and AB may be associated with increased risk estimates for VTE in pregnancy and the puerperium.
PubMed ID
15670036 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of ovarian cancer ICD-10 diagnosis in a Danish population-based hospital discharge registry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16919
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2005;26(3):266-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
M S Tetsche
M. Nørgaard
M V Skriver
E S Andersen
T L Lash
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 2005;26(3):266-70
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
International Classification of Diseases - standards
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Survival Analysis
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: We estimated the accuracy of ICD-10 diagnosis of ovarian cancer in a Danish discharge registry (HDR) by comparing it with Cancer Registry data (DCR). STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Patients (N=489) living in North Jutland County, Denmark with ovarian cancer or borderline tumour registered in the HDR or the DCR. We estimated the completeness and positive predictive value (PPV) of ovarian cancer discharge diagnosis. Mortality rates were constructed for both registries. RESULTS: The completeness in the HDR for ovarian cancer was 96% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94%-98%) and PPV was 87% (95% CI: 85%-90%). 87 (18%) of the patients coded with ovarian cancer in the HDR had borderline tumours. When borderline tumours were excluded from the DCR, the PPV declined to 69% and the completeness did not change. The mortality rate ratio for ovarian cancer registered in the HDR compared to the DCR was 1.08 (95% CI: 0.90-1.29). CONCLUSION: The discharge data (ICD-10) had some misclassification, but can be a valuable tool in assessment of the prognosis of ovarian cancer.
PubMed ID
15991523 View in PubMed
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Acute infections and venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130192
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
M. Schmidt
E. Horvath-Puho
R W Thomsen
L. Smeeth
H T Sørensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. morten.schmidt@dce.au.dk
Source
J Intern Med. 2012 Jun;271(6):608-18
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Aged
Algorithms
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Bacteremia - complications
Bacterial Infections - complications - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Case-Control Studies
Community-Acquired Infections - complications
Cross Infection - complications - drug therapy
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Inpatients - statistics & numerical data
Intraabdominal Infections - complications
Logistic Models
Male
Medical Records
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Outpatients - statistics & numerical data
Prevalence
Pulmonary Embolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - complications
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Skin Diseases, Bacterial - complications
Urinary Tract Infections - complications
Venous Thromboembolism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
Data on the association between acute infections and venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse. We examined whether various hospital-diagnosed infections or infections treated in the community increase the risk of VTE.
We conducted this population-based case-control study in Northern Denmark (population 1.8 million) using medical databases. We identified all patients with a first hospital-diagnosed VTE during the period 1999-2009 (n = 15 009). For each case, we selected 10 controls from the general population matched for age, gender and county of residence (n = 150 074). We identified all hospital-diagnosed infections and community prescriptions for antibiotics 1 year predating VTE. We used odds ratios from a conditional logistic regression model to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of VTE within different time intervals of the first year after infection, controlling for confounding.
Respiratory tract, urinary tract, skin, intra-abdominal and bacteraemic infections diagnosed in hospital or treated in the community were associated with a greater than equal to twofold increased VTE risk. The association was strongest within the first 2 weeks after infection onset, gradually declining thereafter. Compared with individuals without infection during the year before VTE, the IRR for VTE within the first 3 months after infection was 12.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): 11.3-13.9) for patients with hospital-diagnosed infection and 4.0 (95% CI: 3.8-4.1) for patients treated with antibiotics in the community. Adjustment for VTE risk factors reduced these IRRs to 3.3 (95% CI: 2.9-3.8) and 2.6 (95% CI: 2.5-2.8), respectively. Similar associations were found for unprovoked VTE and for deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism individually.
Infections are a risk factor for VTE.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22026462 View in PubMed
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Acute low back pain: is the number of patients taking sick leave exponentially related to time?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214519
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1995 Sep;13(3):238-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995

Adjustment disorder and risk of Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278398
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2016 Apr;23(4):751-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
E. Svensson
D K Farkas
J L Gradus
T L Lash
H T Sørensen
Source
Eur J Neurol. 2016 Apr;23(4):751-6
Date
Apr-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjustment Disorders - epidemiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Comorbidity
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Parkinson disease - epidemiology
Registries
Risk
Young Adult
Abstract
It has been postulated that stress is part of the etiological process of Parkinson's disease (PD). The risk of PD was examined in a cohort of patients with adjustment disorders, a diagnosis made in the presence of a severe response to a stressful life event.
Using Danish medical registries, PD occurrence was examined in a nationwide population-based cohort of patients with adjustment disorder diagnosed between 1995 and 2011. The standardized incidence ratio of PD was calculated as the ratio of observed to expected cases, stratified by time and potential risk factors, including depression and anxiety.
Our adjustment disorder cohort (67 786 patients) was followed for a median of 8 years (interquartile range 4, 12.6 years). During follow-up, 119 patients developed PD, versus 64 expected, corresponding to a standardized incidence ratio of 1.84 (95% confidence interval 1.53, 2.20). Consistent results were observed after stratification on potential risk factors, including depression and anxiety.
Adjustment disorder, a diagnosis made in the presence of severe response to stressful life events, was associated with an increased risk of PD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26756302 View in PubMed
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Admission for and mortality from primary venous thromboembolism in women of fertile age in Denmark, 1977-95.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200765
Source
BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):820-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1999
Author
L. Mellemkjaer
H T Sørensen
L. Dreyer
J. Olsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, DK-2 100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. lene@cancer.dk
Source
BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):820-1
Date
Sep-25-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Middle Aged
Survival Rate
Thromboembolism - mortality - therapy
Venous Thrombosis - mortality - therapy
Notes
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Comment In: BMJ. 1999 Sep 25;319(7213):795-610496802
PubMed ID
10496825 View in PubMed
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[Alcohol consumption and liver enzymes in persons 30-50 years of age. Cross-sectional study from Ebeltoft]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10941
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Sep 29;159(40):5945-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-29-1997
Author
F H Steffensen
H T Sørensen
A. Brock
H. Vilstrup
T. Lauritzen
Author Affiliation
Aarhus Universitet, Sundhedsprojekt Ebeltoft, Institut for Almen Medicin og Center for Epidemiologisk Grundforskning.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Sep 29;159(40):5945-50
Date
Sep-29-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alanine Transaminase - blood
Alcohol Drinking
Aspartate Aminotransferases - blood
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Liver - enzymology
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic - diagnosis - enzymology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Abstract
In a representative population sample of 905 persons we examined the prevalence of raised levels of liver-derived enzymes and its possible association with self-reported alcohol consumption adjusted for smoking and BMI applying logistic regression analyses. A large proportion of 12% (women 8%; men 16%) presented raised liver-derived enzymes. Below 21 units per week (one unit equals 12 grams of alcohol) there was no association with self-reported alcohol consumption. However, the risk of abnormal liver enzymes increased with higher consumption for both sexes; if the intake was above 28 units per week, the odds ratio for raised liver enzymes increased dramatically. Whether this subclinical biochemical liver condition is an early marker of alcohol-related liver damage remains to be seen, but the long-term consequences of the reported alcohol consumption and the frequency of raised liver enzymes require follow-up.
PubMed ID
9381568 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and serum liver-derived enzymes in a Danish population aged 30-50 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11094
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb;26(1):92-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1997
Author
F H Steffensen
H T Sørensen
A. Brock
H. Vilstrup
T. Lauritzen
Author Affiliation
Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, University of Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 1997 Feb;26(1):92-9
Date
Feb-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alanine Transaminase - metabolism
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - metabolism
Aspartate Aminotransferases - metabolism
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Health education
Humans
Incidence
Liver - enzymology
Liver Function Tests
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
gamma-Glutamyltransferase - metabolism
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Based on the increased consumption of alcohol in Denmark the aim of this study was to measure prevalence of abnormal liver-derived enzymes in a homogeneous Danish population and possible associations with alcohol consumption, smoking and body mass index (BMI). METHOD: In a representative population sample of 905 people (aged 30-50) from the baseline survey of the Ebeltoft Health Promotion Project in Denmark, we examined prevalence of abnormal liver-derived enzymes and its possible association with self-reported alcohol consumption, smoking and BMI, applying logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: In a significant proportion, 12% (women 8%; men 16%) of the cohort we found raised levels of liver-derived enzymes associated with moderate self-reported alcohol intake adjusted for BMI and smoking. If the intake was higher than moderate, i.e. > 28 units per week (one unit equals 12 g of alcohol), the odds ratio (OR) for raised liver enzymes increased further; S-gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) (OR: for women 24.4; men 18.4). S-aspartate-aminotransferase (ASAT) (24.2; 5.8) and S-alanine-aminotransferase (ALAT) (27.2; 3.0). Furthermore, daily smoking increased the risk of raised liver enzymes in women (OR: 3.4-4.2), and obesity (BMI > or = 30 kg/m2) in men showed a positive association with all three enzymes (OR: 3.0-9.0). CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of raised liver-derived enzymes was frequent in the Danish population sample and associated with moderate self-reported alcohol consumption adjusted for BMI and smoking.
PubMed ID
9126508 View in PubMed
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Alcohol drinking and risk of subsequent hospitalisation with pneumonia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100920
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-9-2011
Author
J B Kornum
K M Due
M. Nørgaard
A. Tjønneland
K. Overvad
H T Sørensen
R W Thomsen
Author Affiliation
Clinical Institute, Aarhus University Hospital Aarhus Denmark.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2011 Jun 9;
Date
Jun-9-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
The dose-response relationship between alcohol consumption and pneumonia risk in healthy individuals is poorly understood. We examined 22,485 males and 24,682 females from Denmark who were aged 50-64 yrs. Subjects were without major chronic diseases at baseline and had median 12 yrs follow-up for first-time hospitalisation with pneumonia. 1,091 (males) and 944 (females) had a pneumonia-related hospitalisation. Among males, the risk of pneumonia was increased for alcohol abstainers and those who drank large weekly amounts: Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for 0, 7-20, 21-34, 35-50, and >50 drinks per week were 1.49 (95% CI 1.00-2.21), 0.88 (0.76-1.03), 0.87 (0.72-1.05), 1.15 (0.93-1.44), and 1.81 (1.40-2.33), respectively, compared with 1-6 drinks per week. The association between high alcohol intake and pneumonia persisted after controlling for subsequent chronic diseases. Among females, HRs for 0, 7-20, 21-35, and >35 drinks weekly were 1.26 (0.89-1.79), 1.01 (0.88-1.17), 1.10 (0.88-1.37), and 0.54 (0.29-1.01), respectively. For the same moderate to high weekly alcohol amount, infrequent intake yielded higher pneumonia HRs than more regular intake in both sexes. Regular moderate alcohol intake is not associated with increased risk of hospitalisation for pneumonia. High weekly alcohol consumption in males and infrequent heavy drinking in both sexes may increase pneumonia risk.
PubMed ID
21659417 View in PubMed
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235 records – page 1 of 24.