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83 records – page 1 of 9.

Adjuvant radiotherapy and risk of contralateral breast cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24377
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Aug 19;84(16):1245-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-19-1992
Author
H H Storm
M. Andersson
J D Boice
M. Blettner
M. Stovall
H T Mouridsen
P. Dombernowsky
C. Rose
A. Jacobsen
M. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Rigistry, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Aug 19;84(16):1245-50
Date
Aug-19-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breast Neoplasms - etiology - radiotherapy
Case-Control Studies
Combined Modality Therapy
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Menopause
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Neoplasms, Second Primary - etiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The risk of contralateral breast cancer is increased twofold to fivefold for breast cancer patients. A registry-based cohort study in Denmark suggested that radiation treatment of the first breast cancer might increase the risk for contralateral breast cancer among 10-year survivors. PURPOSE: Our goal was to assess the role of radiation in the development of contralateral breast cancer. METHODS: A nested case-control study was conducted in a cohort of 56,540 women in Denmark diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from 1943 through 1978. Case patients were 529 women who developed contralateral breast cancer 8 or more years after first diagnosis. Controls were women with breast cancer who did not develop contralateral breast cancer. One control was matched to each case patient on the basis of age, calendar year of initial breast cancer diagnosis, and survival time. Radiation dose to the contralateral breast was estimated for each patient on the basis of radiation measurements and abstracted treatment information. The anatomical position of each breast cancer was also abstracted from medical records. RESULTS: Radiotherapy had been administered to 82.4% of case patients and controls, and the mean radiation dose to the contralateral breast was estimated to be 2.51 Gy. Radiotherapy did not increase the overall risk of contralateral breast cancer (relative risk = 1.04; 95% confidence interval = 0.74-1.46), and there was no evidence that risk varied with radiation dose, time since exposure, or age at exposure. The second tumors in case patients were evenly distributed in the medial, lateral, and central portions of the breast, a finding that argues against a causal role of radiotherapy in tumorigenesis. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of women in our series were perimenopausal or postmenopausal (53% total versus 38% premenopausal and 9% of unknown status) and received radiotherapy at an age when the breast tissue appears least susceptible to the carcinogenic effects of radiation. Based on a dose of 2.51 Gy and estimates of radiation risk from other studies, a relative risk of only 1.18 would have been expected for a population of women exposed at an average age of 51 years. Thus, our data provide additional evidence that there is little if any risk of radiation-induced breast cancer associated with exposure of breast tissue to low-dose radiation (e.g., from mammographic x rays or adjuvant radiotherapy) in later life.
PubMed ID
1640483 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer following multiple chest fluoroscopies among tuberculosis patients. A case-control study in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26342
Source
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1986 Jul-Dec;25(4-6):233-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
H H Storm
E. Iversen
J D Boice
Source
Acta Radiol Oncol. 1986 Jul-Dec;25(4-6):233-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Neoplasms - etiology
Denmark
Female
Fluoroscopy - adverse effects
Humans
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - etiology
Pneumothorax, Artificial
Radiation Dosage
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Time Factors
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - radiography - surgery
Abstract
A case-control study of breast cancer among tuberculosis (TB) patients in Denmark (1937-1954) was conducted to provide additional information on the radiation risk associated with low-dose chest fluoroscopy exposures. Records of 46013 TB patients were linked to the Danish Cancer Registry and 125 subsequent female breast cancers identified. Medical records were located for 89 (71%) of these women who developed breast cancer and on 390 controls, who were individually matched to cases on age and calendar year of TB diagnosis, and survival. Common risk factors for breast cancer such as nulliparity (relative risk (RR) = 2.5) and high relative weight (RR = 2.6) were also identified in this population of TB patients. However no risk was evident with exposure to any type of fluoroscopy (RR = 0.6; 95% CI = 0.2-1.4), or to fluoroscopies performed to monitor lung collapse therapy (RR = 0.8; 95% CI = 0.5-1.4). Although based on only 7 breast cancers, there was a suggestion of an increased risk among women who received greater than 1 Gy to their breasts (RR = 1.6; 95% CI = 0.4-6.3). Because of the infrequent use of fluoroscopy in our study, the breast doses were too low, 0.27 Gy on average, to expect to detect a significant elevation in breast cancer risk overall. The findings do suggest, however, that current estimates of breast cancer risk following radiation are not greater than presently accepted, and that a relative excess of 40 per cent can be excluded with reasonable confidence following breast doses on the order of 0.3 Gy.
PubMed ID
3030049 View in PubMed
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[Breast cancer in women under 20 years of age]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25767
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Oct 10;150(41):2469-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-1988

Cancer among Circumpolar Inuit 1969-1988. Introduction and methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4065
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
N. Christensen
L A Gaudette
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):539-43
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Cancer incidence data for Circumpolar Inuit populations were developed and compiled from Greenland, Canada and Alaska from 1969 to 1988 to provide the largest possible base of data for documenting the unusual patterns of cancer previously reported for these populations. Cancer incidence and population data were transferred to the Danish Cancer Registry. Coded information from various ICD-classifications and codes for the basis of diagnosis were transformed to one format, enabling joint analysis. Standard descriptive analysis was carried out with presentation of number of cases, crude incidence rates (CR), age-standardized rates (world) (ASR), cumulative rates to age 64 years, and indirectly standardized ratios (SIR) to the populations of Connecticut (USA), Canada and Denmark. The resulting database can be used to support collaborative international research among the Inuit populations.
PubMed ID
8813060 View in PubMed
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[Cancer among Danish workers engaged in cleaning radioactive pollution in Thule, Greenland in 1968]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature26139
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1987 Apr 27;149(18):1218-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-27-1987

Cancer incidence among Danish Thorotrast-exposed patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24353
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Sep 2;84(17):1318-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-1992
Author
M. Andersson
H H Storm
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Sep 2;84(17):1318-25
Date
Sep-2-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angiography
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Gallbladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Radiation Dosage
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Thorium Dioxide - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Studies of groups of patients given injections of the alpha-emitting x-ray contrast medium Thorotrast may provide information on human alpha-ray carcinogenesis. PURPOSE: We re-established a formerly identified cohort of neurological patients receiving injections of Thorotrast for cerebral arteriography and assessed their incidence of cancer. METHODS: Using the national population register, the Danish Cancer Registry, and other registers, we determined the incidence of cancer among Thorotrast-injected patients. Incidence ratios were standardized to the general population and computed for different cancer sites. RESULTS: The cumulative risk for cancer at all sites (excluding brain tumors where the standardized incidence ratio [SIR] was 28) reached 86% 50 years after Thorotrast injection. SIR was greatly elevated at all sites except the brain and CNS (3.3, 95% confidence interval = 3.0-3.7), mainly because of liver cancers (SIR = 126) as well as leukemia (SIR = 10) for which a relationship was found between the time since injection and the estimated dose (but not the age at injection). Other sites with significantly increased risks of cancer included the gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts (SIR = 14), peritoneum (SIR = 8.6), sites of multiple myeloma (SIR = 4.6), metastatic sites (SIR = 12), and unspecified sites (SIR = 11). Cancers of the lung and breast also occurred in significant excess, but no relationship between SIR and volume of injected Thorotrast or time since injection was observed. Cancer risk was increased at most other sites, although this increase was not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Alpha radiation may account for the increased risk of tumors of the liver, gallbladder, and peritoneum as well as leukemia and multiple myeloma, whereas confounding factors most probably contribute to the increased risks at other sites.
PubMed ID
1495101 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit 1969-1988. A summary.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3545
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):621-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
L A Gaudette
A P Lanier
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):621-8
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Food Habits
Forecasting
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology - genetics - prevention & control
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Reproduction
Research
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Russia - epidemiology - ethnology
Sexual Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Abstract
The results of an international, collaborative study of cancer in Circumpolar Inuit in Greenland, Canada, Alaska and Russia are summarized. A total of 3 255 incident cancers were diagnosed from 1969 to 1988 among 85 000-110 000 individuals. Indirect standardization (SIR) based on comparison populations in Connecticut (USA), Canada and Denmark showed excess risk of cancer of the lung, nasopharynx, salivary glands, gallbladder and extrahepatic bile ducts in both sexes, of liver and stomach cancer in men, and renal and cervical cancer in women. Low risk was observed for cancer of the bladder, breast, endometrium and prostate, and for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin's disease, leukaemia, multiple myeloma and melanoma. Age-standardized incidence rates (ASRs) of cancer of lung, cervix, nasopharynx and salivary glands among Inuit were among the world's highest as were rates in women of oesophageal and renal cancer. Regional differences in ASRs within the Circumpolar area were observed for cancer of the cervix, lung, colon and rectum, liver, gallbladder and breast. The differences in the Inuit cancer incidence pattern to some extent reflect known variations in lifestyle, diet and other exposures, as well as implementation of cancer control measures. Future research addressing possible individual differences are needed to evaluate environmental and genetic factors in etiology and evaluate intervention studies.
PubMed ID
8813071 View in PubMed
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Cancer in Circumpolar Inuit. Background information for the cancer pattern in Greenland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3549
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
N H Nielsen
H H Storm
Author Affiliation
Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):535-7
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Demography
Diet
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Life Style
Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Topography, Medical
Abstract
The cancer pattern among Inuit in the Circumpolar area have shown marked differences to other populations in the world. The current paper summarises important risk factors in Greenland, including the physical environment, diet, alcohol, tobacco and other lifestyle factors. Details on population structure and history, health care and cancer registration are also included. This information is important for the interpretation of the incidence pattern for the Circumpolar Inuit collectively and for the understanding of differences between the various Inuit populations of the North.
PubMed ID
8813059 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cancer of the digestive system in Circumpolar Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3548
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):553-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
H H Storm
N H Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1996;35(5):553-70
Date
1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology - ethnology
Arctic Regions - epidemiology - ethnology
Biliary Tract Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Digestive System Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Female
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Incidence
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Liver Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Male
Pancreatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Distribution
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Cancer of the oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, colon, rectum, liver, gallbladder, biliary tract and pancreas was studied in the Inuit populations of Alaska, Canada and Greenland. Indirect standardization to the populations in Canada, Connecticut (USA) and Denmark was used. High risk of oesophageal cancer was observed in both sexes with standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of up to 7. An increased risk of colon and rectum cancer occurred among Alaskan Inuit compared with the Inuit populations in Canada and Greenland, which had lower rates. Liver and gallbladder cancer rates were high, with SIRs of 1.5 to 4.1, whereas there were no differences in pancreatic cancer in the populations compared. Dietary habits, alcohol and tobacco consumption are believed to play an important role in most of the observed cancer patterns, but for liver cancer hepatitis B virus infection is also believed to have a causal role.
PubMed ID
8813062 View in PubMed
Less detail

83 records – page 1 of 9.