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Calcium, phosphorus, and osteoporosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244372
Source
Fed Proc. 1981 Jul;40(9):2434-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1981
Author
H H Draper
C A Scythes
Source
Fed Proc. 1981 Jul;40(9):2434-8
Date
Jul-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging
Bone and Bones - metabolism
Calcium - deficiency
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Canada
Dairy Products
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutritional Requirements
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - etiology
Phosphorus - administration & dosage
United States
Abstract
Gross epidemiological data indicate there are no significant differences in rates of aging osteopenia among countries with substantially different amounts of Ca in their national food supplies. This-observation, plus the fact that Ca administration fails to reverse osteoporotic bone loss, has led some investigators to conclude that Ca nutrition is an insignificant factor in the etiology of osteoporosis. However, it has become apparent that a Ca intake that may be adequate for adults consuming a low protein, low P, neural, or alkaline cereal-based diet is not necessarily adequate for subjects consuming a high protein, high P, acidic mixed Western diet. Ca administration inhibits postmenopausal osteopenia and there is epidemiological evidence that a liberal Ca intake reduces bone loss in middle adulthood. Ca intakes in the United States and Canada appear generally satisfactory among children and young adults, but low intakes by many individuals of middle age is a cause for concern, especially among women. Although the Ca:P ratio for the average diet consumed in these countries (about 1:1.6) appears to be satisfactory, a low intake of dairy foods, coupled with a high intake of other foods rich in natural and added phosphorus, may raise the ratio above 1:2, a value beyond which animal studies indicate that there is a risk of increased bone loss.
PubMed ID
7250388 View in PubMed
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Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 May;57(5):698-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1993
Author
H H Draper
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1993 May;57(5):698-9
Date
May-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Humans
Inuits
Nutrition Surveys
Notes
Comment On: Am J Clin Nutr. 1992 May;55(5):1024-321570796
PubMed ID
8480692 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1975 Aug; 28(8):808-813.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1975
Author
C K Wei Wo
H H Draper
Author Affiliation
University of Illinois
Source
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1975 Aug; 28(8):808-813.
Date
1975
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Wainwright
Point Hope
Kasigluk
Nunapitchuk
Diet, traditional
Alpha-tocopherol
Lipids
Nutrition
Polyunsaturated fatty acids
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alaska
Animals
Child
Cholesterol - blood
Diet Surveys
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Meat - analysis
Middle Aged
Pinnipedia
Reindeer
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Sex Factors
Ursidae
Vitamin E - analysis - blood
Whales
Abstract
A survey was conducted during 1971-1973 on the vitamin E status of Alaskan Eskomos. The subjects were 315 residents of the northern coastal villages of Wainwright and Point Hope and the southwestern inland villages of Kasigluk and Nunapitchuk. Plasma vitamin E levels for the 6- to 17-year-old subjects at Wainwright, Point Hope, and Nunapitchuk were 0.81 plus or minus 0.26, 0.90 plus or minus 0.20, and 0.84 plus or minus 0.25 mg/100 ml (mean and standard deviation), respectively. The values for adults at Wainwright, Point Hope, and Kasigluk were 1.23 plus or minus 0.27, 1.23 plus or minus 0.27, and 1.27 plus or minus 0.33 mg/100 ml, respectively. No value less than 0.30 mg/100 ml was observed. Alpha-tocopherol was the only isomer present in significant amounts. Plasma vitamin E levels did not change significantly between 6 and 17 years of age; however, a steady increase with age was observed in the 18- to 69-year-old groups. Plasma alpha-tocopherol concentrations were significantly lower in children than in adults but there were no differences attributable to sex or geographic location. Vitamin E concentration in the blood plasma was linearly correlated with cholesterol concentration. Values are reported for the vitamin E content of some native foods. This study indicates that plasma vitamin E levels in Alaskan Eskimos consuming a high meat or fish diet are comparable to those in adults of the United States consuming a mixed diet.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1233.
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