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Association of Radical Local Treatment with Mortality in Men with Very High-risk Prostate Cancer: A Semiecologic, Nationwide, Population-based Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291221
Source
Eur Urol. 2017 07; 72(1):125-134
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
07-2017
Author
Pär Stattin
Fredrik Sandin
Frederik Birkebæk Thomsen
Hans Garmo
David Robinson
Ingela Franck Lissbrant
Håkan Jonsson
Ola Bratt
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. Electronic address: par.stattin@umu.se.
Source
Eur Urol. 2017 07; 72(1):125-134
Date
07-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Androgen Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Databases, Factual
Humans
Kallikreins - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Staging
Prostate-Specific Antigen - blood
Prostatectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Prostatic Neoplasms - blood - mortality - pathology - therapy
Radiotherapy - mortality
Radiotherapy Dosage
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Current guidelines recommend androgen deprivation therapy only for men with very high-risk prostate cancer (PCa), but there is little evidence to support this stance.
To investigate the association between radical local treatment and mortality in men with very high-risk PCa.
Semiecologic study of men aged
Notes
CommentIn: Eur Urol. 2017 Apr;71(4):e113-e114 PMID 27717521
CommentIn: Eur Urol. 2017 Apr;71(4):e115-e116 PMID 27720538
PubMed ID
27481175 View in PubMed
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Blood glucose and risk of incident and fatal cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (me-can): analysis of six prospective cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98549
Source
PLoS Med. 2009 Dec;6(12):e1000201
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Tanja Stocks
Kilian Rapp
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Hanno Ulmer
Randi Selmer
Annekatrin Lukanova
Dorthe Johansen
Hans Concin
Steinar Tretli
Göran Hallmans
Håkan Jonsson
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
PLoS Med. 2009 Dec;6(12):e1000201
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Body mass index
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Prospective studies have indicated that elevated blood glucose levels may be linked with increased cancer risk, but the strength of the association is unclear. We examined the association between blood glucose and cancer risk in a prospective study of six European cohorts. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can) includes cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden; the current study included 274,126 men and 275,818 women. Mean age at baseline was 44.8 years and mean follow-up time was 10.4 years. Excluding the first year of follow-up, 18,621 men and 11,664 women were diagnosed with cancer, and 6,973 men and 3,088 women died of cancer. We used Cox regression models to calculate relative risk (RR) for glucose levels, and included adjustment for body mass index (BMI) and smoking status in the analyses. RRs were corrected for regression dilution ratio of glucose. RR (95% confidence interval) per 1 mmol/l increment of glucose for overall incident cancer was 1.05 (1.01-1.10) in men and 1.11 (1.05-1.16) in women, and corresponding RRs for fatal cancer were 1.15 (1.07-1.22) and 1.21 (1.11-1.33), respectively. Significant increases in risk among men were found for incident and fatal cancer of the liver, gallbladder, and respiratory tract, for incident thyroid cancer and multiple myeloma, and for fatal rectal cancer. In women, significant associations were found for incident and fatal cancer of the pancreas, for incident urinary bladder cancer, and for fatal cancer of the uterine corpus, cervix uteri, and stomach. CONCLUSIONS: Data from our study indicate that abnormal glucose metabolism, independent of BMI, is associated with an increased risk of cancer overall and at several cancer sites. Our data showed stronger associations among women than among men, and for fatal cancer compared to incident cancer. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
PubMed ID
20027213 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and other metabolic syndrome factors and risk of brain tumour in the large population-based Me-Can cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128682
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Michael Edlinger
Susanne Strohmaier
Håkan Jonsson
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Wegene T Borena
Christel Häggström
Anders Engeland
Steinar Tretli
Hans Concin
Gabriele Nagel
Randi Selmer
Dorthe Johansen
Tanja Stocks
Göran Hallmans
Pär Stattin
Hanno Ulmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.
Source
J Hypertens. 2012 Feb;30(2):290-6
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood pressure
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - physiopathology
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Brain tumour has few established determinants. We assessed to which extent risk of brain tumour was related to metabolic syndrome factors in adults.
In the Me-Can project, 580?000 individuals from Sweden, Austria, and Norway were followed for a median of 10 years after baseline measurement. Data on brain tumours were obtained from national cancer registries. The factors of metabolic syndrome (BMI, SBP and DBP, and blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, and triglycerides), separately and combined, were analysed in quintiles and for transformed z-scores (mean transformed to 0 and standard deviation to 1). Cox proportional hazards multivariate regression models were used, with corrections for measurement error.
During follow-up, 1312 primary brain tumours were diagnosed, predominantly meningioma (n?=?348) and high-grade glioma (n?=?436). For meningioma, the hazard ratio was increased for z-scores of SBP [hazard ratio?=?1.27 per unit standard deviation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.03-1.57], of DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.29, 95% CI 1.04-1.58), and of the combined metabolic syndrome score (hazard ratio?=?1.31, 95% CI 1.11-1.54). An increased risk of high-grade glioma was found for DBP (hazard ratio?=?1.23, 95% CI 1.01-1.50) and triglycerides (hazard ratio?=?1.35, 95% CI 1.05-1.72). For both meningioma and high-grade glioma, the risk was more than double in the fifth quintiles of DBP compared to the lowest quintile. For meningioma this risk was even larger for SBP.
Increased blood pressure was associated with risk of brain tumours, especially of meningiomas.
PubMed ID
22179083 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure and risk of cancer incidence and mortality in the Metabolic Syndrome and Cancer Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126806
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):802-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Tanja Stocks
Mieke Van Hemelrijck
Jonas Manjer
Tone Bjørge
Hanno Ulmer
Göran Hallmans
Björn Lindkvist
Randi Selmer
Gabriele Nagel
Steinar Tretli
Hans Concin
Anders Engeland
Håkan Jonsson
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
Hypertension. 2012 Apr;59(4):802-10
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Austria - epidemiology
Blood Pressure - physiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality
Norway - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Characteristics
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Observational studies have shown inconsistent results for the association between blood pressure and cancer risk. We investigated the association in 7 cohorts from Norway, Austria, and Sweden. In total, 577799 adults with a mean age of 44 years were followed for, on average, 12 years. Incident cancers were 22184 in men and 14744 in women, and cancer deaths were 8724 and 4525, respectively. Cox regression was used to calculate hazard ratios of cancer per 10-mmHg increments of midblood pressure, which corresponded with 0.7 SDs and, for example, an increment of systolic/diastolic blood pressure of 130/80 to 142/88 mmHg. All of the models used age as the time scale and were adjusted for possible confounders, including body mass index and smoking status. In men, midblood pressure was positively related to total incident cancer (hazard ratio per 10 mmHg increment: 1.07 [95% CI: 1.04-1.09]) and to cancer of the oropharynx, colon, rectum, lung, bladder, kidney, malignant melanoma, and nonmelanoma skin cancer. In women, midblood pressure was not related to total incident cancer but was positively related to cancer of the liver, pancreas, cervix, uterine corpus, and malignant melanoma. A positive association was also found for cancer mortality, with HRs per 10-mmHg increment of 1.12 (95% CI: 1.08-1.15) for men and 1.06 (95% CI: 1.02-1.11) for women. These results suggest a small increased cancer risk overall in men with elevated blood pressure level and a higher risk for cancer death in men and women.
PubMed ID
22353615 View in PubMed
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Cohort Profile: The Metabolic syndrome and Cancer project (Me-Can).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151439
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun;39(3):660-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Tanja Stocks
Wegene Borena
Susanne Strohmaier
Tone Bjørge
Jonas Manjer
Anders Engeland
Dorthe Johansen
Randi Selmer
Göran Hallmans
Kilian Rapp
Hans Concin
Håkan Jonsson
Hanno Ulmer
Pär Stattin
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. tanja.stocks@urologi.umu.se
Source
Int J Epidemiol. 2010 Jun;39(3):660-7
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Austria - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Epidemiologic Research Design
Humans
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Program Development
Sweden - epidemiology
Notes
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PubMed ID
19380371 View in PubMed
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Comments to the letters by Per-Henrik Zahl and Jan Maehlen and by Peter C. Gotzsche concerning our article: Increased incidence of invasive breast cancer after the introduction of service screening with mammography in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16587
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 May 15;118(10):2649
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2006
Author
Håkan Jonsson
Robert Johansson
Per Lenner
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2006 May 15;118(10):2649
Date
May-15-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
No abstract.
PubMed ID
16353150 View in PubMed
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Daily text messages used as a method for assessing low back pain among workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273547
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2016 Feb;70:45-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Lage Burström
Håkan Jonsson
Bodil Björ
Ulla Hjalmarsson
Tohr Nilsson
Christina Reuterwall
Jens Wahlström
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2016 Feb;70:45-51
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Mining
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Pain Measurement - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Risk factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Text Messaging
Abstract
To evaluate a method for collecting data concerning low back pain (LBP) using daily text messages and to characterize the reported LBP in terms of intensity, variability, and episodes.
We conducted a cohort study of LBP among workers used by a mining company. The participants were asked to answer the question "How much pain have you had in your lower back in the last 24 hours on a scale from 0 to 10, where 0 = no pain and 10 = the worst pain imaginable" once a day for 5 weeks, with this process being repeated 6 months later.
A total of 121 workers participated in the first period of data collection, and 108 participated in the second period. The daily response rate was 93% for both periods, and cluster analysis was shown to be a feasible statistical method for clustering LBP into subgroups of low, medium, and high pain. The daily text messages method also worked well for assessing the episodic nature of LBP.
We have demonstrated a method for repeatedly measuring of LBP using daily text messages. The data permitted clustering into subgroups and could be used to define episodes of LBP.
PubMed ID
26342444 View in PubMed
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Detection of breast cancer with mammography in the first screening round in relation to expected incidence in different age groups.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18535
Source
Acta Oncol. 2003;42(1):22-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Håkan Jonsson
Lars-Gunnar Larsson
Per Lenner
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Umeå University, Sweden. hakan.jonsson@oc.umu.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 2003;42(1):22-9
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - radiography
Female
Humans
Incidence
Mammography - statistics & numerical data
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The ratio (R) of prevalence of screening-detected breast cancer in the first screening round (P) was compared with the expected incidence rate (I) for different age groups in several screening programs. Published data on the first screening round from three Swedish randomized trials and six counties with service screening were used. The women invited to take part in the screening were aged 40-74 years. Not only P and I but also R increased with increasing age. With the youngest age group as reference, the increase was statistically significant for both invasive cancer and invasive cancer and carcinoma in situ together. The studied ratio (R) can be thought of as a measure of efficiency in detecting breast cancer cases in mammography screening. The reasons for the increase are probably that the breast tissue of younger women is denser, which makes the cancer more difficult to detect by mammography, and that slow-growing cancers tend to appear more frequently in older women.
PubMed ID
12665327 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of population-based service screening with mammography for women ages 40 to 49 years: evaluation of the Swedish Mammography Screening in Young Women (SCRY) cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140372
Source
Cancer. 2011 Feb 15;117(4):714-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-15-2011
Author
Barbro Numan Hellquist
Stephen W Duffy
Shahin Abdsaleh
Lena Björneld
Pál Bordás
László Tabár
Bedrich Viták
Sophia Zackrisson
Lennarth Nyström
Håkan Jonsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. barbro.numan@oc.umu.se
Source
Cancer. 2011 Feb 15;117(4):714-22
Date
Feb-15-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - radiography - surgery
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Government Programs
Humans
Mammography
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Sweden
Abstract
The effectiveness of mammography screening for women ages 40 to 49 years still is questioned, and few studies of the effectiveness of service screening for this age group have been conducted.
Breast cancer mortality was compared between women who were invited to service screening at ages 40 to 49 years (study group) and women in the same age group who were not invited during 1986 to 2005 (control group). Together, these women comprise the Mammography Screening of Young Women (SCRY) cohort, which includes all Swedish counties. A prescreening period was defined to facilitate a comparison of mortality in the absence of screening. The outcome measure was refined mortality, ie, breast cancer death for women who were diagnosed during follow-up at ages 40 to 49 years. Relative risks (RRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated.
There was no significant difference in breast cancer mortality during the prescreening period. During the study period, there were 803 breast cancer deaths in the study group (7.3 million person-years) and 1238 breast cancer deaths in the control group (8.8 million person-years). The average follow-up was 16 years. The estimated RR for women who were invited to screening was 0.74 (95% CI, 0.66-0.83), and the RR for women who attended screening was 0.71 (95% CI, 0.62-0.80).
In this comprehensive study, mammography screening for women ages 40 to 49 years was efficient for reducing breast cancer mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Cancer. 2011 Sep 1;117(17):4100; author reply 4100-121387271
Comment In: Cancer. 2012 Feb 15;118(4):1170; author reply 1170-121766292
Comment In: Cancer. 2012 Feb 15;118(4):1169; author reply 1170-121766290
PubMed ID
20882563 View in PubMed
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Effectiveness of population-based service screening with mammography for women ages 40 to 49 years with a high or low risk of breast cancer: socioeconomic status, parity, and age at birth of first child.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261071
Source
Cancer. 2015 Jan 15;121(2):251-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-15-2015
Author
Barbro Numan Hellquist
Kamila Czene
Anna Hjälm
Lennarth Nyström
Håkan Jonsson
Source
Cancer. 2015 Jan 15;121(2):251-8
Date
Jan-15-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aging
Breast Neoplasms - economics - epidemiology - radiography
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Early Detection of Cancer - economics - methods
Female
Humans
Mammography - economics
Mass Screening - economics - methods
Middle Aged
Parity
Parturition
Program Evaluation
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Social Class
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Invitation to mammography screening of women aged 40 to 49 years is a matter of debate in many countries and a cost-effective alternative in countries without screening among women aged 40 to 49 years could be inviting those at higher risk. The relative effectiveness of mammography screening was estimated for subgroups based on the breast cancer risk factors parity, age at time of birth of first child, and socioeconomic status (SES).
The SCReening of Young Women (SCRY) database consists of all women aged 40 to 49 years in Sweden between 1986 and 2005 and was split into a study and control group. The study group consisted of women residing in areas in which women aged 40 to 49 years were invited to screening and the control group of women in areas in which women aged 40 to 49 years were not invited to screening. Rate ratio (RR) estimates were calculated for 2 exposures: invitation and attendance.
There were striking similarities noted in the RR pattern for women invited to and attending screening and no statistically significant difference or trend in the RR was noted by risk group. The RR estimates increased by increasing parity for parity of 0 to 2 and ranged from 0.55 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.38-0.79) to 0.79 (95% CI, 0.65-0.95) for attending women. The RR for women with high SES was lower than that for women with low SES (RR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.60-0.86] and RR, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.63-0.99], respectively). For women aged 20 to 24 years at the time of the birth of their first child, the RR was 0.73 (95% CI, 0.58-0.91) and estimates for other ages were similar.
There was no statistically significant difference noted in the relative effectiveness of mammography screening by parity, age at the time of birth of the first child, or SES.
PubMed ID
25242087 View in PubMed
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36 records – page 1 of 4.