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-160C/A polymorphism in the E-cadherin gene promoter and risk of hereditary, familial and sporadic prostate cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17926
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Apr 10;109(3):348-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2004
Author
Jonsson B-A
Adami H-O
Hägglund M
Bergh A
Göransson I
Stattin P
Wiklund F
Grönberg H
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Biosciences, Pathology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2004 Apr 10;109(3):348-52
Date
Apr-10-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cadherins - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions (Genetics)
Prostate
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The E-cadherin (CDH1) gene has been associated with prostate carcinogenesis. The C/A polymorphism--160 base pairs relative to the transcription start site has been shown to decrease gene transcription. We analyzed the association between this polymorphism and the risk of sporadic, familial (2 close relatives) and hereditary (3 or more close relatives) prostate cancer. We combined data from 3 population-based epidemiologic studies in Sweden encompassing altogether 1,036 prostate cancer cases and 669 controls that were genotyped for the short nucleotide polymorphism. Odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were estimated through unconditional logistic regression. We found no significant association between the A-allele and sporadic (OR = 1.0; 95% CI = 0.8-1.2) or familial (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 0.9-2.2) prostate cancer. In contrast, risk of hereditary cancer was increased among heterozygote CA carriers (OR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.0-2.7) and particularly among homozygote AA carriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.4-4.9). Our data indicate that the -160 single nucleotide polymorphism in CDH1 is a low-penetrant prostate cancer susceptibility gene that might explain a proportion of familial and notably hereditary prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
14961571 View in PubMed
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High risk of new knee injury in elite footballers with previous anterior cruciate ligament injury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82864
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2006 Feb;40(2):158-62; discussion 158-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Waldén M.
Hägglund M.
Ekstrand J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Society, Linköping University, S-581 83 Linköping, Sweden. markus.walden@telia.com
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2006 Feb;40(2):158-62; discussion 158-62
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anterior Cruciate Ligament - injuries
Humans
Knee Injuries - etiology
Male
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Soccer - injuries
Sweden
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury is a severe event for a footballer, but it is unclear if the knee injury rate is higher on returning to football after ACL injury. OBJECTIVE: To study the risk of knee injury in elite footballers with a history of ACL injury compared with those without. METHOD: The Swedish male professional league (310 players) was studied during 2001. Players with a history of ACL injury at the study start were identified. Exposure to football and all time loss injuries during the season were recorded prospectively. RESULTS: Twenty four players (8%) had a history of 28 ACL injuries in 27 knees (one rerupture). These players had a higher incidence of new knee injury of any type than the players without ACL injury (mean (SD) 4.2 (3.7) v 1.0 (0.7) injuries per 1000 hours, p = 0.02). The risk of suffering a knee overuse injury was significantly higher regardless of whether the player (relative risk 4.8, 95% confidence interval 2.0 to 11.2) or the knee (relative risk 7.9, 95% confidence interval 3.4 to 18.5) was used as the unit of analysis. No interactive effects of age or any other anthropometric data were seen. CONCLUSION: The risk of new knee injury, especially overuse injury, was significantly increased on return to elite football after ACL injury regardless of whether the player or the knee was used as the unit of analysis.
PubMed ID
16432004 View in PubMed
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Previous injury as a risk factor for injury in elite football: a prospective study over two consecutive seasons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81392
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2006 Sep;40(9):767-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Hägglund M.
Waldén M.
Ekstrand J.
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Society, Linköping University, S-58183 Linköping, Sweden. martin.hagglund@ihs.liu.se
Source
Br J Sports Med. 2006 Sep;40(9):767-72
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Male
Recurrence
Seasons
Soccer - injuries
Sweden - epidemiology
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previous injury is often proposed to be a risk factor for football injury, but most studies rely on players reporting their own medical history and are thus potentially subject to recall bias. Little is known about the natural variation in injury pattern between seasons. OBJECTIVES: To study whether prospectively recorded injuries during one season are associated with injuries sustained during the following season, and to compare injury risk and injury pattern between consecutive seasons. METHODS: The medical staffs of 12 elite Swedish male football teams prospectively recorded individual exposure and time loss injuries over two full consecutive seasons (2001 and 2002). A multivariate model was used to determine the relation between previous injury, anthropometric data, and the risk of injury. RESULTS: The training and match injury incidences were similar between seasons (5.1 v 5.3 injuries/1000 training hours and 25.9 v 22.7/1000 match hours), but analysis of injury severity and injury patterns showed variations between seasons. Players who were injured in the 2001 season were at greater risk of any injury in the following season compared with non-injured players (hazard ratio 2.7; 95% confidence interval 1.7 to 4.3, p
PubMed ID
16855067 View in PubMed
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