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Cultural orientation and safety app for new and short-term health care providers in Nunavut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306426
Source
Can J Public Health. 2020 10; 111(5):694-700
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
10-2020
Author
Gwen Healey Akearok
Taha Tabish
Maria Cherba
Author Affiliation
Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre, Iqaluit, Canada.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2020 10; 111(5):694-700
Date
10-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
One of the greatest challenges of Nunavut's health care system is its reliance on short-term professionals, many of whom are not oriented to the Inuit historical/cultural context and the organization of health care in the territory. Our objective was to develop a free iOS/Android app to address this knowledge gap.
We reviewed existing literature and interviewed key stakeholders to develop the content of the app covering the following: Inuit ways of communicating and expectations in the health care setting; Inuit history, settlement, and societal values (including a bibliography and a list of Inuktitut language phrases and resources); health care model (including referral pathways for tertiary care and mental health referrals); maps and community information; and useful information to prepare for your arrival. The app, HealthNU, was launched in September 2017. We targeted new and short-term health care providers in Nunavut, and the app has also been circulated and used by social workers, educators, and health care providers outside of the territory.
By September 5, 2019, the app had been downloaded more than 700 times. To evaluate the app, we conducted interviews and a brief survey with key stakeholders (n?=?18), who indicated that (1) the app was easy to use; (2) the content was highly relevant and would result in improved cultural competencies; and (3) they would recommend the app to colleagues and were already using it for recruitment/orientation. Challenges and limitations included: ensuring practitioners "completed" all modules while reading/using the app, and low response rate among providers who were solicited for feedback.
HealthNU is an example of how technology solutions developed in partnership with community members, health care providers, researchers, and government can improve the quality of care for Nunavummiut. We are currently working with the Nunavut Department of Health to develop similar apps in other contexts.
PubMed ID
32219728 View in PubMed
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Diving below the surface: A framework for arctic health research to support thriving communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311884
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2021 Apr 25; :14034948211007694
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-25-2021
Author
Katie Cueva
Elizabeth Rink
JosÉE G Lavoie
Jon P A Stoor
Gwen Healey Akearok
Elena Gladun
Christina V L Larsen
Author Affiliation
Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, USA.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2021 Apr 25; :14034948211007694
Date
Apr-25-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Historically, health research in the Arctic has focused on documenting ill-health using a narrow set of deficit-oriented epidemiologic indicators (i.e., prevalence of disease and mortality rates). While useful, this type of research does not adequately capture the breadth and complexities of community health and well-being, and fails to highlight solutions. A community's context, strengths, and continued expressions of well-being need to guide inquiries, inform processes, and contextualize recommendations. In this paper, we present a conceptual framework developed to address the aforementioned concerns and inform community-led health and social research in the Arctic.
The proposed framework is informed by our collective collaborations with circumpolar communities, and syntheses of individual and group research undertaken throughout the Circumpolar North. Our framework encourages investigation into the contextual factors that promote circumpolar communities to thrive.
Our framework centers on the visual imagery of an iceberg. There is a need to dive deeper than superficial indicators of health to examine individual, family, social, cultural, historical, linguistic, and environmental contexts that support communities in the Circumpolar North to thrive. A participatory community-based approach in conjunction with ongoing epidemiologic research is necessary in order to effectively support health and wellness. Conclusions: The iceberg framework is a way to conceptualize circumpolar health research and encourage investigators to both monitor epidemiologic indicators and also dive below the surface using participatory methodology to investigate contextual factors that support thriving communities.
PubMed ID
33899601 View in PubMed
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Perspectives of Nunavut patients and families on their cancer and end of life care experiences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305790
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1766319
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-2020
Author
Tracey Galloway
Sidney Horlick
Maria Cherba
Madeleine Cole
Roberta L Woodgate
Gwen Healey Akearok
Author Affiliation
Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto Mississauga , Mississauga, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1766319
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
The present study arose from a recognition among service providers that Nunavut patients and families could be better supported during their care journeys by improved understanding of people's experiences of the health-care system. Using a summative approach to content analysis informed by the Piliriqatigiinniq Model for Community Health Research, we conducted in-depth interviews with 10 patients and family members living in Nunavut communities who experienced cancer or end of life care. Results included the following themes: difficulties associated with extensive medical travel; preference for care within the community and for family involvement in care; challenges with communication; challenges with culturally appropriate care; and the value of service providers with strong ties to the community. These themes emphasise the importance of health service capacity building in Nunavut with emphasis on Inuit language and cultural knowledge. They also underscore efforts to improve the quality and consistency of communication among health service providers working in both community and southern referral settings and between service providers and the patients and families they serve.
PubMed ID
32449489 View in PubMed
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Plan, recruit, retain: a framework for local healthcare organizations to achieve a stable remote rural workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304851
Source
Hum Resour Health. 2020 09 03; 18(1):63
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
09-03-2020
Author
Birgit Abelsen
Roger Strasser
David Heaney
Peter Berggren
Sigurður Sigurðsson
Helen Brandstorp
Jennifer Wakegijig
Niclas Forsling
Penny Moody-Corbett
Gwen Healey Akearok
Anne Mason
Claire Savage
Pam Nicoll
Author Affiliation
The National Centre for Rural Medicine, The Department of Community Medicine, UiT, Tromsø, Norway. birgit.abelsen@uit.no.
Source
Hum Resour Health. 2020 09 03; 18(1):63
Date
09-03-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Recruiting and retaining a skilled health workforce is a common challenge for remote and rural communities worldwide, negatively impacting access to services, and in turn peoples' health. The research literature highlights different factors facilitating or hindering recruitment and retention of healthcare workers to remote and rural areas; however, there are few practical tools to guide local healthcare organizations in their recruitment and retention struggles. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development process, the contents, and the suggested use of The Framework for Remote Rural Workforce Stability. The Framework is a strategy designed for rural and remote healthcare organizations to ensure the recruitment and retention of vital healthcare personnel.
The Framework is the result of a 7-year, five-country (Sweden, Norway, Canada, Iceland, and Scotland) international collaboration combining literature reviews, practical experience, and national case studies in two different projects.
The Framework consists of nine key strategic elements, grouped into three main tasks (plan, recruit, retain). Plan: activities to ensure that the population's needs are periodically assessed, that the right service model is in place, and that the right recruits are targeted. Recruit: activities to ensure that the right recruits and their families have the information and support needed to relocate and integrate in the local community. Retain: activities to support team cohesion, train current and future professionals for rural and remote health careers, and assure the attractiveness of these careers. Five conditions for success are recognition of unique issues; targeted investment; a regular cycle of activities involving key agencies; monitoring, evaluating, and adjusting; and active community participation.
The Framework can be implemented in any local context as a holistic, integrated set of interventions. It is also possible to implement selected components among the nine strategic elements in order to gain recruitment and/or retention improvements.
PubMed ID
32883287 View in PubMed
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