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The development of a comprehensive maternal-child health information system for Nunavut-Nutaqqavut (Our Children).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131396
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):363-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Samantha Lauson
Sarah McIntosh
Natan Obed
Gwen Healey
Sirisha Asuri
Geraldine Osborne
Laura Arbour
Author Affiliation
UBC Department of Medical Genetics, Victoria, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Sep;70(4):363-72
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Welfare
Consumer Health Information - methods
Female
Humans
Information Services - organization & administration
Maternal Welfare
Nunavut
Population Surveillance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - prevention & control
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
Nunavut is the most northerly jurisdiction in Canada of which 85% of inhabitants are Inuit. Although most infants are born healthy, Nunavut leads the country for adverse early child health outcomes such as infant mortality, rates of birth defects, prematurity and low birth weight. Public health and community efforts are needed to understand and improve outcomes.
To inform these issues, a combined University of British Columbia/Nunavut Public Health Strategy effort has initiated a comprehensive maternal-child health surveillance system (from 16 weeks gestation to age 5). A diverse group of professional and lay stakeholders were brought together initially to determine local interest. Following this, a series of small working groups were held to decide on potential prenatal, perinatal and early child health variables, to be documented.
Over 100 Nunavut participants have now had some role in the development of the system which has been initiated. Pre-existing standard prenatal forms and well-child assessment forms have been modified to include "Nunavut specific" variables of nutrition, food and domestic security, exposures in pregnancy, birth defects, development, chronic diseases of childhood and paternal information.
This comprehensive maternal-child health information system has been developed with the extensive input of health care providers and stakeholders, utilizing community and public health systems already in place. Careful assessment of local needs has contributed to database development, privacy protection, potential data utilization for health promotion and plans for dissemination of findings. It is hoped that this will be a user-friendly surveillance system, adaptable to other community and public health systems that will improve the understanding of Aboriginal maternal-child health determinants.
PubMed ID
21910957 View in PubMed
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Introduction [Maternal and Child Health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284552
Source
Page 223 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
2010
  1 document  
Author
Gwen Healey
Author Affiliation
Qaujigiartiit, Arctic Health Research Network - Nunavut, Canada
Source
Page 223 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Documents
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Inuit parent perspectives on sexual health communication with adolescent children in Nunavut: "It's kinda hard for me to try to find the words".

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258233
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Gwen Healey
Author Affiliation
Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre, Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014;73
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
For Inuit, the family unit has always played a central role in life and in survival. Social changes in Inuit communities have resulted in significant transformations to economic, political and cultural aspects of Inuit society. Where the family unit was once the setting for dialogue on family relations and sexuality, this has largely been replaced by teachings from the medical community and/or the school system.
The purpose of this study was to explore Inuit parent perspectives on sharing knowledge with teenage children about sexual health and relationships.
A qualitative Indigenous knowledge approach was used for this study with a focus on Inuit ways of knowing as described in the Piliriqattigiinniq Community Health Research Partnership Model. Interviews were conducted with 20 individual parents in 3 Nunavut communities in 2011. Parents were asked about whether and how they talk to their children about sexual health and relationships. An analytical approach building on the concept of Iqqaumaqatigiiniq ("all knowing coming into one"), which is similar to "immersion and crystallization," was used to identify story elements, groupings or themes in the data. The stories shared by parents are honoured, keeping their words intact as often as possible in the presentation of results.
Parents shared stories of themselves, family members and observations of the community. Fifteen of 17 mothers in the study reported having experienced sexual abuse as children or adolescents. Parents identified the challenges that they have and continue to experience as a result of forced settlement, family displacement and the transition of Inuit society. They expressed a desire to teach their children about sexual health and relationships and identified the need for emotional support to do this in the wake of the trauma they have experienced. Parents highly valued elders and the knowledge they have about family relationships and childrearing.
There are powerful, unresolved healing issues in Inuit communities. The traumatic experiences of the settlement and residential school era continue to have an impact on present-day family relationships. To support parent-child dialogue on sexual health and relationships, parents identified a need to repair relationships between youth and elders, and to provide culturally sensitive support to parents to heal from trauma.
PubMed ID
25405104 View in PubMed
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Patient transportation in Canada's northern territories: patterns, costs and providers' perspectives.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300257
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2019 05; 19(2):5113
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
05-2019
Author
T K Young
Taha Tabish
Stephanie K Young
Gwen Healey
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada kue.young@ualberta.ca.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2019 05; 19(2):5113
Date
05-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Canada's northern territories are characterized by small, scattered populations separated by long distances. A major challenge to healthcare delivery is the reliance on costly patient transportation, especially emergency air evacuations (medevacs). The purpose of this study was to describe the patterns, costs and providers' perspectives on patient transportation, and identify potential factors associated with utilization and performance.
Secondary analyses of medical travel databases and an online survey of nurses in the communities and physicians in regional centers were undertaken.
The proportion of the population living within 100 km of a hospital was 83% in Yukon, 63% in Northwest Territories (NWT) and 21% in Nunavut. In Nunavut and NWT, road access to a hospital was limited to residents of the cities where the hospitals were located, with the rest relying exclusively on air travel. Medevac rates varied among the three territories: 0.9 trips/1000 residents/year in Yukon, 32/1000 in NWT and 53/1000 in Nunavut. In Yukon, all communities except one are road-accessible whereas in Nunavut no communities are connected by roads. The relative absence of roads is a major reason why the patient transportation costs are high in Nunavut and NWT. The rate of medevacs originating from the remote, air-accessible-only communities varied greatly, which cannot be explained by the air distance from the nearest hospital, population size or frequency of health center visits. Medical travel accounts for 5% of the health expenditures in NWT and 20% in Nunavut. A medevac on average costs $218 per person per year in NWT and $700 in Nunavut. The providers survey detected only 66% or less in support of statements that nurses in the communities received timely access to clinical advice, whereas only 50% of physicians agreed with statements that the clinical information provided by the nurses was clear.
Patient transportation, especially emergency air evacuations, is an essential but costly component of the healthcare system serving Canada's north. It is the 'glue' that binds an extensive network of facilities staffed by different categories of health professionals. While system design is largely dictated by geography, addressing human factors such as interprofessional communication is important for improving the system's effectiveness. This study is primarily descriptive and it points to additional areas for improved understanding of the performance of the system.
PubMed ID
31128577 View in PubMed
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A scoping review of Indigenous suicide prevention in circumpolar regions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261034
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
  1 document  
Author
Jennifer Redvers
Peter Bjerregaard
Heidi Eriksen
Sahar Fanian
Gwen Healey
Vanessa Hiratsuka
Michael Jong
Christina Viskum Lytken Larsen
Janice Linton
Nathaniel Pollock
Anne Silviken
Petter Stoor
Susan Chatwood
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015;74:27509
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
636900
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Arctic Regions
Female
Focus Groups
Humans
Male
Mental health
Needs Assessment
Population Groups/ethnology
Population Groups/statistics & numerical data
Primary Prevention/organization & administration
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Suicide/prevention & control
Survival Analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
Background. Suicide is a serious public health challenge in circumpolar regions, especially among Indigenous youth. Indigenous communities, government agencies and health care providers are making concerted efforts to reduce the burden of suicide and strengthen protective factors for individuals, families and communities. The persistence of suicide has made it clear that more needs to be done. Objective. Our aim was to undertake a scoping review of the peer-reviewed literature on suicide prevention and interventions in Indigenous communities across the circumpolar north. Our objective was to determine the extent and types of interventions that have been reported during past decade. We want to use this knowledge to support community initiative and inform intervention development and evaluation. Design. We conducted a scoping review of online databases to identify studies published between 2004 and 2014. We included articles that described interventions in differentiated circumpolar Indigenous populations and provided evaluation data. We retained grey literature publications for comparative reference. Results. Our search identified 95 articles that focused on suicide in distinct circumpolar Indigenous populations; 19 articles discussed specific suicide-related interventions and 7 of these described program evaluation methods and results in detail. The majority of publications on specific interventions were found in North American countries. The majority of prevention or intervention documentation was found in supporting grey literature sources. Conclusion. Despite widespread concern about suicide in the circumpolar world and active community efforts to promote resilience and mental well-being, we found few recorded programs or initiatives documented in the peer-reviewed literature, and even fewer focusing specifically on youth intervention. The interventions described in the studies we found had diverse program designs and content, and used varied evaluation methods and outcomes. The studies we included consistently reported that it was important to use community-based and culturally guided interventions and evaluations. This article summarizes the current climate of Indigenous circumpolar suicide research in the context of intervention and highlights how intervention-based outcomes have largely remained outside of peer-reviewed sources in this region of the world.
PubMed ID
25742882 View in PubMed
Documents
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Transforming Health Care in Remote Communities: report on an international conference.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285022
Source
BMC Proc. 2016;10(Suppl 6):6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
T Kue Young
Susan Chatwood
James Ford
Gwen Healey
Michael Jong
Josée Lavoie
Mason White
Source
BMC Proc. 2016;10(Suppl 6):6
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
An international conference titled "Transforming Health Care in Remote Communities" was held at the Chateau Lacombe Hotel in Edmonton, Canada, April 28-30, 2016. The event was organized by the University of Alberta's School of Public Health, in partnership with the Institute for Circumpolar Health Research in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, and the Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre in Iqaluit, Nunavut. There were 150 registrants from 7 countries: Canada (7 provinces and 3 territories), United States, Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, and Australia. They included representatives of academic institutions, health care agencies, government ministries, community organizations, and private industry. The Conference focused on developing solutions to address health care in remote regions. It enabled new networks to be established and existing ones consolidated.
Notes
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Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null23984309
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Dec 27;72:2269024380077
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 05;72:null23984292
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Oct 26;74:2957626507717
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2010 Aug;71(4):717-2420554364
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 Feb 8;183(2):209-1421041430
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2015 Jul 24;74:2843626214103
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013 Aug 14;72:null23961514
Cites: Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2016 Mar 03;13(3):null26950137
PubMed ID
28813543 View in PubMed
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Youth perspectives on sexually transmitted infections and sexual health in Northern Canada and implications for public health practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279884
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):30706
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2016
Author
Gwen Healey
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016 Jan;75(1):30706
Date
Jan-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Objective High rates of sexually transmitted infections in the Arctic have been a focus of recent research, and youth are believed to be at greatest risk of infection. Little research has focused on understanding youth perspectives on sexual health. The goal of this study was to collect the perspectives of youth in Nunavut on sexual health and relationships with the intent of informing public health practice. Method This qualitative research study was conducted within an Indigenous knowledge framework with a focus on Inuit ways of knowing. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews in three Nunavut communities with 17 youth between the ages of 14 and 19 years. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their experiences talking about sexual health and relationships with their family, peers, teachers or others in the community. Results There are four key findings, which are important for public health: (a) Parents/caregivers are the preferred source of knowledge about sexual health and relationships among youth respondents; (b) youth did not report using the Internet for sexual health information; (c) youth related sexual decision-making to the broader community context and determinants of health, such as poverty; and (d) youth discussed sexual health in terms of desire and love, which is an aspect of sexual health often omitted from the discourse. Implications and contribution The youth in this study articulated perspectives on sexual health, which are largely neglected in current public health practice in the North. The findings from this study underscore the important role of community-led participatory research in contributing to our understanding of the public health challenges in our communities today, and provide direction for future interventions and research.
PubMed ID
28156416 View in PubMed
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Youth perspectives on sexually transmitted infections and sexual health in Northern Canada and implications for public health practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289510
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:30706
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Gwen Healey
Author Affiliation
Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre, Iqaluit, NU, Canada and Northern Ontario School of Medicine; Gwen.healey@qhrc.ca.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:30706
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Nunavut - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Public Health Practice
Qualitative Research
Sexual Health - ethnology
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
High rates of sexually transmitted infections in the Arctic have been a focus of recent research, and youth are believed to be at greatest risk of infection. Little research has focused on understanding youth perspectives on sexual health. The goal of this study was to collect the perspectives of youth in Nunavut on sexual health and relationships with the intent of informing public health practice.
This qualitative research study was conducted within an Indigenous knowledge framework with a focus on Inuit ways of knowing. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews in three Nunavut communities with 17 youth between the ages of 14 and 19 years. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their experiences talking about sexual health and relationships with their family, peers, teachers or others in the community.
There are four key findings, which are important for public health: (a) Parents/caregivers are the preferred source of knowledge about sexual health and relationships among youth respondents; (b) youth did not report using the Internet for sexual health information; (c) youth related sexual decision-making to the broader community context and determinants of health, such as poverty; and (d) youth discussed sexual health in terms of desire and love, which is an aspect of sexual health often omitted from the discourse.
The youth in this study articulated perspectives on sexual health, which are largely neglected in current public health practice in the North. The findings from this study underscore the important role of community-led participatory research in contributing to our understanding of the public health challenges in our communities today, and provide direction for future interventions and research.
Notes
Cites: J Dent Educ. 2003 Sep;67(9):981-90 PMID 14518836
Cites: Prev Med. 2001 Sep;33(3):179-89 PMID 11522159
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014 Oct 21;73:null PMID 25405104
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Aug;45(2):156-62 PMID 19628142
Cites: J Public Health (Oxf). 2011 Jun;33(2):262-71 PMID 20705716
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Aug 25;159(4):329-34 PMID 9732710
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004;63 Suppl 2:270-3 PMID 15736666
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Feb;30(2):109-15 PMID 18254990
Cites: J Health Commun. 2011 Feb;16(2):112-23 PMID 21207311
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2002 Dec;31(6 Suppl):264-79 PMID 12470924
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2014 Apr 16;105(2):e133-7 PMID 24886849
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2001 May;62(3):286-93 PMID 11414337
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Jan;44(1):73-80 PMID 19101461
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Jan;14(1):4-9 PMID 18258070
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2007 Feb;40(2):116-26 PMID 17259051
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Apr 16;71:1-8 PMID 22564463
Cites: Int J STD AIDS. 1997 Mar;8(3):159-65 PMID 9089026
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Aug;36(6):607-18 PMID 18775817
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):1-14 PMID 22569722
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2001 May-Jun;36(6-7):845-65 PMID 11697614
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2006 Nov-Dec;23(6):531-4 PMID 17096778
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2010 Mar;46(3 Suppl):S23-41 PMID 20172458
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Jan 1;320(7226):50-2 PMID 10617534
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Apr 28;379(9826):1641-52 PMID 22538179
Cites: Stud Fam Plann. 2001 Sep;32(3):189-213 PMID 11677692
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-5 PMID 15513673
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 1997 Feb;5(1):43-7 PMID 9437934
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2011 Dec;48(3-4):426-38 PMID 21387118
Cites: Int J STD AIDS. 2015 Feb;26(2):98-106 PMID 24713230
PubMed ID
27938635 View in PubMed
Less detail

Youth perspectives on sexually transmitted infections and sexual health in Northern Canada and implications for public health practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289668
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:30706
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
Gwen Healey
Author Affiliation
Qaujigiartiit Health Research Centre, Iqaluit, NU, Canada and Northern Ontario School of Medicine; Gwen.healey@qhrc.ca.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016; 75:30706
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice - ethnology
Humans
Inuits - psychology
Male
Nunavut - epidemiology
Parent-Child Relations
Public Health Practice
Qualitative Research
Sexual Health - ethnology
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - ethnology - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
High rates of sexually transmitted infections in the Arctic have been a focus of recent research, and youth are believed to be at greatest risk of infection. Little research has focused on understanding youth perspectives on sexual health. The goal of this study was to collect the perspectives of youth in Nunavut on sexual health and relationships with the intent of informing public health practice.
This qualitative research study was conducted within an Indigenous knowledge framework with a focus on Inuit ways of knowing. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews in three Nunavut communities with 17 youth between the ages of 14 and 19 years. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their experiences talking about sexual health and relationships with their family, peers, teachers or others in the community.
There are four key findings, which are important for public health: (a) Parents/caregivers are the preferred source of knowledge about sexual health and relationships among youth respondents; (b) youth did not report using the Internet for sexual health information; (c) youth related sexual decision-making to the broader community context and determinants of health, such as poverty; and (d) youth discussed sexual health in terms of desire and love, which is an aspect of sexual health often omitted from the discourse.
The youth in this study articulated perspectives on sexual health, which are largely neglected in current public health practice in the North. The findings from this study underscore the important role of community-led participatory research in contributing to our understanding of the public health challenges in our communities today, and provide direction for future interventions and research.
Notes
Cites: J Dent Educ. 2003 Sep;67(9):981-90 PMID 14518836
Cites: Prev Med. 2001 Sep;33(3):179-89 PMID 11522159
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2014 Oct 21;73:null PMID 25405104
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Aug;45(2):156-62 PMID 19628142
Cites: J Public Health (Oxf). 2011 Jun;33(2):262-71 PMID 20705716
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Aug 25;159(4):329-34 PMID 9732710
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2004;63 Suppl 2:270-3 PMID 15736666
Cites: J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2008 Feb;30(2):109-15 PMID 18254990
Cites: J Health Commun. 2011 Feb;16(2):112-23 PMID 21207311
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2002 Dec;31(6 Suppl):264-79 PMID 12470924
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2014 Apr 16;105(2):e133-7 PMID 24886849
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 2001 May;62(3):286-93 PMID 11414337
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2009 Jan;44(1):73-80 PMID 19101461
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2008 Jan;14(1):4-9 PMID 18258070
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2007 Feb;40(2):116-26 PMID 17259051
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2012 Apr 16;71:1-8 PMID 22564463
Cites: Int J STD AIDS. 1997 Mar;8(3):159-65 PMID 9089026
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2008 Aug;36(6):607-18 PMID 18775817
Cites: Am Indian Alsk Native Ment Health Res. 2012;19(1):1-14 PMID 22569722
Cites: Subst Use Misuse. 2001 May-Jun;36(6-7):845-65 PMID 11697614
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2006 Nov-Dec;23(6):531-4 PMID 17096778
Cites: J Adolesc Health. 2010 Mar;46(3 Suppl):S23-41 PMID 20172458
Cites: BMJ. 2000 Jan 1;320(7226):50-2 PMID 10617534
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Apr 28;379(9826):1641-52 PMID 22538179
Cites: Stud Fam Plann. 2001 Sep;32(3):189-213 PMID 11677692
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2004;32(5):390-5 PMID 15513673
Cites: Aust J Rural Health. 1997 Feb;5(1):43-7 PMID 9437934
Cites: Am J Community Psychol. 2011 Dec;48(3-4):426-38 PMID 21387118
Cites: Int J STD AIDS. 2015 Feb;26(2):98-106 PMID 24713230
PubMed ID
27938635 View in PubMed
Less detail

Youth perspectives on sexually transmitted infections and sexual health in Northern Canada and implications for public health practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature277979
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:30706
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Gwen Healey
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2016;75:30706
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
High rates of sexually transmitted infections in the Arctic have been a focus of recent research, and youth are believed to be at greatest risk of infection. Little research has focused on understanding youth perspectives on sexual health. The goal of this study was to collect the perspectives of youth in Nunavut on sexual health and relationships with the intent of informing public health practice.
This qualitative research study was conducted within an Indigenous knowledge framework with a focus on Inuit ways of knowing. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews in three Nunavut communities with 17 youth between the ages of 14 and 19 years. Participants were asked open-ended questions about their experiences talking about sexual health and relationships with their family, peers, teachers or others in the community.
There are four key findings, which are important for public health: (a) Parents/caregivers are the preferred source of knowledge about sexual health and relationships among youth respondents; (b) youth did not report using the Internet for sexual health information; (c) youth related sexual decision-making to the broader community context and determinants of health, such as poverty; and (d) youth discussed sexual health in terms of desire and love, which is an aspect of sexual health often omitted from the discourse.
The youth in this study articulated perspectives on sexual health, which are largely neglected in current public health practice in the North. The findings from this study underscore the important role of community-led participatory research in contributing to our understanding of the public health challenges in our communities today, and provide direction for future interventions and research.
PubMed ID
27938635 View in PubMed
Less detail

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