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Leukemia in childhood and adolescence and exposure to ionizing radiation in homes built from uranium-containing alum shale concrete.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19269
Source
Epidemiology. 2002 Mar;13(2):146-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2002
Author
Olav Axelson
Mats Fredrikson
Gustav Akerblom
Lennart Hardell
Author Affiliation
Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Department of Health and Environment, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. olav.axelson@ymk.liu.se
Source
Epidemiology. 2002 Mar;13(2):146-50
Date
Mar-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinogens, Environmental - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Gamma Rays
Housing
Humans
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Radon - adverse effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Concerns in Sweden about indoor radon around 1980 prompted measurements of gamma-radiation from the facades of houses to identify those constructed of uranium-containing alum shale concrete, with potentially high radon concentrations. To evaluate any possible risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia from exposure to elevated gamma-radiation in these homes, we identified the acute lymphocytic leukemia cases less than 20 years of age in Sweden during 1980-1989 as well as eight controls per case from the population registry, matching on age, gender, and county. Using the existing measurements, exposure was assessable for 312 cases and 1,418 controls from 151 properly measured municipalities. A conditional logistic odds ratio of 1.4 (95% confidence interval = 1.0-1.9) was obtained for those ever having lived in alum shale concrete houses, with the average exposure exceeding 0.10 microsieverts per hour. Comparing those who ever lived in alum shale concrete houses (divided by higher and lower annual average exposure) with those who never lived in such houses, we found a weak dose-response relation. The results suggest some risk of acute lymphocytic leukemia from indoor ionizing radiation among children and young adults.
PubMed ID
11880754 View in PubMed
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Lung cancer risk and radon exposure in a cohort of iron ore miners in Malmberget, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96283
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;67(8):519-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Håkan Jonsson
Ingvar A Bergdahl
Gustav Akerblom
Kåre Eriksson
Kurt Andersson
Leif Kågström
Bengt Järvholm
Lena Damber
Author Affiliation
Oncology, Department of Radiation Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. hakan.jonsson@oc.umu.se
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2010 Aug;67(8):519-25
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Lung cancer caused by radon in miners is a well-known risk. However, the risk estimates vary between studies and between mines. We have studied the dose response-relationship in a Swedish iron ore mine where two other studies have previously reached different risk estimates. As this mine has relatively low radon levels, the results are highly relevant for risk estimation in non-uranium underground mines. METHODS: A new cohort of 5486 male workers employed from 1923 to 1996 was established. Cumulative radon exposures were assessed based on a large number of measurements, including reconstructions of historical conditions. 122 lung cancer cases occurred during the follow-up period of 1958-2000. RESULTS: The average cumulative exposure in underground workers was 32 kBq year/m(3) (65 working level months (WLM)), experienced over 14.6 years. The excess RR (ERR) per kBq year/m(3) was 0.046 (95% CI 0.015 to 0.077; 0.022 ERR/WLM). Confounding by quartz may affect these results but appears to account only for 10-20% of the risk. The results for squamous cell and small cell lung cancer were 0.049 and 0.072, respectively. However, no increased risk was observed for adenocarcinoma (0.000 ERR per kBq year/m(3), 95% CI -0.017 to 0.017). CONCLUSION: Our overall risk estimate is about half of that found in the first Malmberget study but twice that found in the same cohort in the previously published pooled analysis. Radon did not increase the risk for adenocarcinoma in the lung.
PubMed ID
20647379 View in PubMed
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