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A cessation program for snuff-dippers with long-term, extensive exposure to Swedish moist snuff: A 1-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140904
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2010 Nov;68(6):377-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Mats Wallström
Gunilla Bolinder
Bengt Hassèus
Jan-M Hirsch
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Institute of Odontology, Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden. mats.wallstrom@odontologi.gu.se
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 2010 Nov;68(6):377-84
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Counseling
Humans
Middle Aged
Motivation
Nicotine - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Nicotinic Agonists - therapeutic use
Polymethacrylic Acids - therapeutic use
Polyvinyls - therapeutic use
Prospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Sweden
Tobacco Use Cessation - methods
Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Tobacco Use Disorder - drug therapy - therapy
Tobacco, Smokeless
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Smokeless tobacco (Swedish moist 'snus') users are often strongly addicted to nicotine. Compared to the large number of smoking-cessation studies, there have been few evaluated clinical cessation programs in conjunction with nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). The aim of this study was to evaluate a cessation program for snus users with a weekly use of >2 cans/week for >10 years.
A prospective, open, non-randomized intervention trial was undertaken including baseline oral examination and soft tissue biopsy, minor physical examination, brief cessation advice, NRT recommendations and five prospective follow-up visits within 12 months. Individual cessation counseling was given, together with oral examination in the dental office. Fifty snus users with a minimum consumption of 100 g/week who were actively seeking cessation treatment were recruited through advertising. Self-reported abstaining, including random-sample biochemical verification, and NRT use were evaluated at 6 weeks and 3, 6 and 12 months.
At the 3-, 6- and 12-month visits, 58%, 46% and 30% of subjects, respectively were tobacco-abstinent. All nicotine abstinence was randomly controlled during the study except at 12 months, where all subjects claiming abstinence were confirmed biochemically and clinically.
Smokeless tobacco cessation achieved together with suitable NRT seems a promising way to improve a persistent tobacco-free condition.
PubMed ID
20831357 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Mar 17-23;107(11):770-1
Publication Type
Article

Does individual learning styles influence the choice to use a web-based ECG learning programme in a blended learning setting?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127956
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2012;12:5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Mikael Nilsson
Jan Östergren
Uno Fors
Anette Rickenlund
Lennart Jorfeldt
Kenneth Caidahl
Gunilla Bolinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Solna, Karolinska Institutet, 171 76, Stockholm, Sweden. Mikael.Nilsson@karolinska.se
Source
BMC Med Educ. 2012;12:5
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiology - education
Choice Behavior
Computer-Assisted Instruction - methods
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Educational Measurement
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
The compressed curriculum in modern knowledge-intensive medicine demands useful tools to achieve approved learning aims in a limited space of time. Web-based learning can be used in different ways to enhance learning. Little is however known regarding its optimal utilisation. Our aim was to investigate if the individual learning styles of medical students influence the choice to use a web-based ECG learning programme in a blended learning setting.
The programme, with three types of modules (learning content, self-assessment questions and interactive ECG interpretation training), was offered on a voluntary basis during a face to face ECG learning course for undergraduate medical students. The Index of Learning Styles (ILS) and a general questionnaire including questions about computer and Internet usage, preferred future speciality and prior experience of E-learning were used to explore different factors related to the choice of using the programme or not.
93 (76%) out of 123 students answered the ILS instrument and 91 the general questionnaire. 55 students (59%) were defined as users of the web-based ECG-interpretation programme. Cronbach's alpha was analysed with coefficients above 0.7 in all of the four dimensions of ILS. There were no significant differences with regard to learning styles, as assessed by ILS, between the user and non-user groups; Active/Reflective; Visual/Verbal; Sensing/Intuitive; and Sequential/Global (p = 0.56-0.96). Neither did gender, prior experience of E-learning or preference for future speciality differ between groups.
Among medical students, neither learning styles according to ILS, nor a number of other characteristics seem to influence the choice to use a web-based ECG programme. This finding was consistent also when the usage of the different modules in the programme were considered. Thus, the findings suggest that web-based learning may attract a broad variety of medical students.
Notes
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Cites: BMC Med Educ. 2006;6:3416784524
PubMed ID
22248183 View in PubMed
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["Everybody has rhinitis". Experiences of the course of a "new" influenza in Sweden in 1890].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145843
Source
Lakartidningen. 2009 Nov 25-Dec 1;106(48):3279-81
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gunilla Bolinder
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm. gunilla.bolinder@karolinska.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2009 Nov 25-Dec 1;106(48):3279-81
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Disease Control - history
Disease Outbreaks - history
History, 19th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - history - mortality - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
20101844 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Final reply about snuff: increased awareness in the target]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature67307
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Aug 28;100(35):2708
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-2003
Author
Gunilla Bolinder
Göran Boëthius
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Aug 28;100(35):2708
Date
Aug-28-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Conflict of Interest
Drug Industry
Humans
Smoking Cessation
Sweden
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
PubMed ID
14531133 View in PubMed
Less detail

Interprofessional clinical training for undergraduate students in an emergency department setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125197
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 Jul;26(4):319-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Anne Ericson
Italo Masiello
Gunilla Bolinder
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. anne.ericson@karolinska.se
Source
J Interprof Care. 2012 Jul;26(4):319-25
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Chi-Square Distribution
Cooperative Behavior
Curriculum
Emergency Service, Hospital
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interdisciplinary Communication
Male
Models, Educational
Orthopedics
Physical Therapists - education
Professional Role
Questionnaires
Statistics, nonparametric
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Students, Medical - psychology
Students, Nursing - psychology
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Interprofessional education (IPE) for teams of undergraduate students has since 1999 been carried out at the orthopedic emergency department at the Karolinska University Hospital. During a 2-week period, teams of medical, nursing and physiotherapy students practice together. With the aim of training professional and collaboration skills, the teams take care of patients with varying acute complaints, under the guidance of supervisors from each profession. This study describes the educational model and compares the attitudes of the different student categories participating in this unique IPE model. All students who participated in this experience during the period 2008-2010 were asked to fill in a questionnaire on completion of their training period. Results showed that all three categories, with no significant difference, highly appreciated the setting and the team training. Results also showed that the training significantly increased the students' knowledge of their own professional role as well as their knowledge of the other professions. We conclude that training at an emergency department can provide excellent opportunities for interprofessional team training for undergraduate students. The teamwork enhances the students' understanding of the professional roles and can contribute to a more holistic approach to patient care.
PubMed ID
22506846 View in PubMed
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[Snuff and ill-health--a pedagogic problem for physicians]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69041
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2310-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Gunilla Bolinder
Göran Boëthius
Author Affiliation
Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm. gunilla.bolinder@ks.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2310-1
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Harm Reduction
Health education
Humans
Patient Education
Physician's Role
Sweden
Tobacco Use Cessation
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
PubMed ID
12872379 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Swedish physicians smoke least in all the world. A new study of smoking habits and attitudes to tobacco]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18916
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Jul 25;99(30-31):3111-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-25-2002
Author
Gunilla Bolinder
Lars Himmelmann
Kerstin Johansson
Author Affiliation
Medicinkliniken, Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm. gunilla.bolinder@ks.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2002 Jul 25;99(30-31):3111-7
Date
Jul-25-2002
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Role
Physicians - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Smoking - epidemiology - psychology
Smoking Cessation
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco, Smokeless
World Health
Abstract
Since 1969, studies of Swedish doctors' tobacco habits and attitudes have been carried out regularly every fifth year. The present investigation was made in 2001 in the form of a questionnaire distributed to a random sample of 5% of Swedish doctors (n = 1,367). The response rate was 80%. The proportion of daily smokers was 6%, a figure that had not changed since 1996. More doctors had never smoked (44% compared with 38% in 1996). Most smokers were found among psychiatrists and surgeons (10%). The use of oral snuff had increased to 16% among male and 5% among female doctors (compared with 9% and 3% in 1996). About 50% of the doctors believed that the use of snuff increased the risk of hypertension, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction and oral cancer. Protection of health was the main reason for not smoking (98%). An overall majority (92%) of doctors advise patients with lung diseases and pregnant women not to smoke, and only a few (16%) never give advice about smoking cessation to smokers with non-smoking related diseases. Many doctors do not allow smoking in their homes (69%) and ask for smoke free hotel rooms (82%). The doctor as a role model for patients was regarded as important by 71%. The number of smokers in the general Swedish population was as low as 19% in 2001, achieving the WHO goal for the year 2000. The low, unchanged level of 6% of doctors who smoke daily indicates that it might be possible to achieve a target level of 5-10% among the general population. The slowly increasing use of snuff requires further studies.
PubMed ID
12198930 View in PubMed
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Use of snuff and lung cancer mortality: unwarranted claim of causal association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97131
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2010 May;38(3):332-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010

[Use of snuff is a controversial public health issue].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124985
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Mar 14-20;109(11):564-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
Gunilla Bolinder
Author Affiliation
Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, FoUU-ledningen, Stockholm. gunilla.bolinder@karolinska.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Mar 14-20;109(11):564-7
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Evidence-Based Medicine
Humans
Public Health
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control
Sweden
Tobacco Use Disorder - prevention & control
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
PubMed ID
22530426 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.