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Association of Genetically Predicted Lipid Levels With the Extent of Coronary Atherosclerosis in Icelandic Adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature308096
Source
JAMA Cardiol. 2020 01 01; 5(1):13-20
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-01-2020
Author
Eythór Björnsson
Guðmar Thorleifsson
Anna Helgadóttir
Thórarinn Guðnason
Tómas Guðbjartsson
Karl Andersen
Sólveig Grétarsdóttir
Ísleifur Ólafsson
Vinicius Tragante
Ólafur Hreiðar Ólafsson
Birna Jónsdóttir
Guðmundur I Eyjólfsson
Ólöf Sigurðardóttir
Guðmundur Thorgeirsson
Daníel F Guðbjartsson
Unnur Thorsteinsdóttir
Hilma Hólm
Kári Stefánsson
Author Affiliation
deCODE genetics/Amgen Inc, Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
JAMA Cardiol. 2020 01 01; 5(1):13-20
Date
01-01-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Causality
Cholesterol - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Cholesterol, LDL - blood
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology - therapy
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Hyperlipidemias - blood - epidemiology - genetics
Iceland - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Mendelian Randomization Analysis
Middle Aged
Myocardial Revascularization
Severity of Illness Index
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Triglycerides - blood
Vascular Calcification - epidemiology - genetics - physiopathology
Abstract
Genetic studies have evaluated the influence of blood lipid levels on the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD), but less is known about how they are associated with the extent of coronary atherosclerosis.
To estimate the contributions of genetically predicted blood lipid levels on the extent of coronary atherosclerosis.
This genetic study included Icelandic adults who had undergone coronary angiography or assessment of coronary artery calcium using cardiac computed tomography. The study incorporates data collected from January 1987 to December 2017 in Iceland in the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry and 2 registries of individuals who had undergone percutaneous coronary interventions and coronary artery bypass grafting. For each participant, genetic scores were calculated for levels of non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (non-HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and triglycerides, based on reported effect sizes of 345 independent, lipid-associated variants. The genetic scores' predictive ability for lipid levels was assessed in more than 87?000 Icelandic adults. A mendelian randomization approach was used to estimate the contribution of each lipid trait.
Genetic scores for levels of non-HDL-C, LDL-C, HDL-C, and triglycerides.
The extent of angiographic CAD and coronary artery calcium quantity.
A total of 12?460 adults (mean [SD] age, 65.1 [10.7] years; 8383 men [67.3%]) underwent coronary angiography, and 4837 had coronary artery calcium assessed by computed tomography. A genetically predicted increase in non-HDL-C levels by 1 SD (38 mg/dL [to convert to millimoles per liter, multiply by 0.0259]) was associated with greater odds of obstructive CAD (odds ratio [OR], 1.83 [95% CI, 1.63-2.07]; P?=?2.8?×?10-23). Among patients with obstructive CAD, there were significant associations with multivessel disease (OR, 1.26 [95% CI, 1.11-1.44]; P?=?4.1?×?10-4) and 3-vessel disease (OR, 1.47 [95% CI, 1.26-1.72]; P?=?9.2?×?10-7). There were also significant associations with the presence of coronary artery calcium (OR, 2.04 [95% CI, 1.70-2.44]; P?=?5.3?×?10-15) and loge-transformed coronary artery calcium (effect, 0.70 [95% CI, 0.53-0.87]; P?=?1.0?×?10-15). Genetically predicted levels of non-HDL-C remained associated with obstructive CAD and coronary artery calcium extent even after accounting for the association with LDL-C. Genetically predicted levels of HDL-C and triglycerides were associated individually with the extent of coronary atherosclerosis, but not after accounting for the association with non-HDL cholesterol.
In this study, genetically predicted levels of non-HDL-C were associated with the extent of coronary atherosclerosis as estimated by 2 different methods. The association was stronger than for genetically predicted levels of LDL-C. These findings further support the notion that non-HDL-C may be a better marker of the overall burden of atherogenic lipoproteins than LDL-C.
PubMed ID
31746962 View in PubMed
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Association of variants at UMOD with chronic kidney disease and kidney stones-role of age and comorbid diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99316
Source
PLoS Genet. 2010;6(7):e1001039
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Hilma Holm
Olafur S Indridason
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Vidar Edvardsson
Patrick Sulem
Femmie de Vegt
Frank C H d'Ancona
Martin den Heijer
Leifur Franzson
Thorunn Rafnar
Kristleifur Kristjansson
Unnur S Bjornsdottir
Gudmundur I Eyjolfsson
Lambertus A Kiemeney
Augustine Kong
Runolfur Palsson
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
deCODE genetics, Reykjavik, Iceland. daniel.gudbjartsson@decode.is
Source
PLoS Genet. 2010;6(7):e1001039
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem that is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. To search for sequence variants that associate with CKD, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) that included a total of 3,203 Icelandic cases and 38,782 controls. We observed an association between CKD and a variant with 80% population frequency, rs4293393-T, positioned next to the UMOD gene (GeneID: 7369) on chromosome 16p12 (OR = 1.25, P = 4.1x10(-10)). This gene encodes uromodulin (Tamm-Horsfall protein), the most abundant protein in mammalian urine. The variant also associates significantly with serum creatinine concentration (SCr) in Icelandic subjects (N = 24,635, P = 1.3 x 10(-23)) but not in a smaller set of healthy Dutch controls (N = 1,819, P = 0.39). Our findings validate the association between the UMOD variant and both CKD and SCr recently discovered in a large GWAS. In the Icelandic dataset, we demonstrate that the effect on SCr increases substantially with both age (P = 3.0 x 10(-17)) and number of comorbid diseases (P = 0.008). The association with CKD is also stronger in the older age groups. These results suggest that the UMOD variant may influence the adaptation of the kidney to age-related risk factors of kidney disease such as hypertension and diabetes. The variant also associates with serum urea (P = 1.0 x 10(-6)), uric acid (P = 0.0064), and suggestively with gout. In contrast to CKD, the UMOD variant confers protection against kidney stones when studied in 3,617 Icelandic and Dutch kidney stone cases and 43,201 controls (OR = 0.88, P = 5.7 x 10(-5)).
PubMed ID
20686651 View in PubMed
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CFH Y402H confers similar risk of soft drusen and both forms of advanced AMD.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50533
Source
PLoS Med. 2006 Jan;3(1):e5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2006
Author
Kristinn P Magnusson
Shan Duan
Haraldur Sigurdsson
Hjorvar Petursson
Zhenglin Yang
Yu Zhao
Paul S Bernstein
Jian Ge
Fridbert Jonasson
Einar Stefansson
Gudleif Helgadottir
Norman A Zabriskie
Thorlakur Jonsson
Asgeir Björnsson
Theodora Thorlacius
Palmi V Jonsson
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Augustine Kong
Hreinn Stefansson
Kang Zhang
Kari Stefansson
Jeffrey R Gulcher
Author Affiliation
DeCODE Genetics, Reykjavik, Iceland. kristinn.p.magnusson@decode.is
Source
PLoS Med. 2006 Jan;3(1):e5
Date
Jan-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible visual impairment in the developed world. The two forms of advanced AMD, geographic atrophy and neovascular AMD, represent different pathological processes in the macula that lead to loss of central vision. Soft drusen, characterized by deposits in the macula without visual loss, are considered to be a precursor of advanced AMD. Recently, it has been proposed that a common missense variant, Y402H, in the Complement Factor H (CFH) gene increases the risk for advanced AMD. However, its impact on soft drusen, GA, or neovascular AMD--or the relationship between them--is unclear. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We genotyped 581 Icelandic patients with advanced AMD (278 neovascular AMD, 203 GA, and 100 with mixed neovascular AMD/GA), and 435 with early AMD (of whom 220 had soft drusen). A second cohort of 431 US patients from Utah, 322 with advanced AMD (244 neovascular AMD and 78 GA) and 109 early-AMD cases with soft drusen, were analyzed. We confirmed that the CFH Y402H variant shows significant association to advanced AMD, with odds ratio of 2.39 in Icelandic patients (p = 5.9 x 10(-12)) and odds ratio of 2.14 in US patients from Utah (p = 2.0 x 10(-9)) with advanced AMD. Furthermore, we show that the Y402H variant confers similar risk of soft drusen and both forms of advanced AMD (GA or neovascular AMD). CONCLUSION: Soft drusen occur prior to progression to advanced AMD and represent a histological feature shared by neovascular AMD and GA. Our results suggest that CFH is a major risk factor of soft drusen, and additional genetic factors and/or environmental factors may be required for progression to advanced AMD.
PubMed ID
16300415 View in PubMed
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Characterizing mutagenic effects of recombination through a sequence-level genetic map.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302150
Source
Science. 2019 Jan 25; 363(6425):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jan-25-2019
Author
Bjarni V Halldorsson
Gunnar Palsson
Olafur A Stefansson
Hakon Jonsson
Marteinn T Hardarson
Hannes P Eggertsson
Bjarni Gunnarsson
Asmundur Oddsson
Gisli H Halldorsson
Florian Zink
Sigurjon A Gudjonsson
Michael L Frigge
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Asgeir Sigurdsson
Simon N Stacey
Patrick Sulem
Gisli Masson
Agnar Helgason
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
deCODE genetics, Amgen, Sturlugata 8, Reykjavik, Iceland. bjarnih@decode.is kstefans@decode.is.
Source
Science. 2019 Jan 25; 363(6425):
Date
Jan-25-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Chromosome Mapping
Crossing Over, Genetic
DNA Mutational Analysis
Epigenesis, Genetic
Female
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotyping Techniques
Humans
Iceland
Male
Maternal Age
Mutation Rate
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Synaptonemal Complex
Abstract
Genetic diversity arises from recombination and de novo mutation (DNM). Using a combination of microarray genotype and whole-genome sequence data on parent-child pairs, we identified 4,531,535 crossover recombinations and 200,435 DNMs. The resulting genetic map has a resolution of 682 base pairs. Crossovers exhibit a mutagenic effect, with overrepresentation of DNMs within 1 kilobase of crossovers in males and females. In females, a higher mutation rate is observed up to 40 kilobases from crossovers, particularly for complex crossovers, which increase with maternal age. We identified 35 loci associated with the recombination rate or the location of crossovers, demonstrating extensive genetic control of meiotic recombination, and our results highlight genes linked to the formation of the synaptonemal complex as determinants of crossovers.
Notes
ErratumIn: Science. 2019 Feb 8;363(6427): PMID 30733390
PubMed ID
30679340 View in PubMed
Less detail

Common and low-frequency variants associated with genome-wide recombination rate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105988
Source
Nat Genet. 2014 Jan;46(1):11-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Augustine Kong
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Michael L Frigge
Gisli Masson
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Rasmus Villemoes
Erna Magnusdottir
Stefania B Olafsdottir
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
1] deCODE Genetics/Amgen, Inc., Reykjavik, Iceland. [2] Faculty of Physical Sciences, School of Engineering and Natural Sciences, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Nat Genet. 2014 Jan;46(1):11-6
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosome Inversion
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Variation
Genome, Human
Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase - genetics
Humans
Iceland
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Recombination, Genetic
Telomere - genetics
Abstract
Meiotic recombination contributes to genetic diversity by yielding new combinations of alleles. Individuals vary with respect to the genome-wide recombination counts in their gametes. Exploiting data resources in Iceland, we compiled a data set consisting of 35,927 distinct parents and 71,929 parent-offspring pairs. Within this data set, we called over 2.2 million recombination events and imputed variants with sequence-level resolution from 2,261 whole genome-sequenced individuals into the parents to search for variants influencing recombination rate. We identified 13 variants in 8 regions that are associated with genome-wide recombination rate, 8 of which were previously unknown. Three of these variants associate with male recombination rate only, seven variants associate with female recombination rate only and three variants affect both. Two are low-frequency variants with large effects, one of which is estimated to increase the male and female genetic maps by 111 and 416 cM, respectively. This variant, located in an intron, would not be found by exome sequencing.
PubMed ID
24270358 View in PubMed
Less detail

Common and rare variants associated with kidney stones and biochemical traits.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272227
Source
Nat Commun. 2015;6:7975
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Asmundur Oddsson
Patrick Sulem
Hannes Helgason
Vidar O Edvardsson
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Gardar Sveinbjörnsson
Eik Haraldsdottir
Gudmundur I Eyjolfsson
Olof Sigurdardottir
Isleifur Olafsson
Gisli Masson
Hilma Holm
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Olafur S Indridason
Runolfur Palsson
Kari Stefansson
Source
Nat Commun. 2015;6:7975
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genetic Variation
Genome, Human
Genome-Wide Association Study
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Kidney Calculi - epidemiology - genetics
Odds Ratio
Quantitative Trait Loci
Abstract
Kidney stone disease is a complex disorder with a strong genetic component. We conducted a genome-wide association study of 28.3 million sequence variants detected through whole-genome sequencing of 2,636 Icelanders that were imputed into 5,419 kidney stone cases, including 2,172 cases with a history of recurrent kidney stones, and 279,870 controls. We identify sequence variants associating with kidney stones at ALPL (rs1256328[T], odds ratio (OR)=1.21, P=5.8 ? 10(-10)) and a suggestive association at CASR (rs7627468[A], OR=1.16, P=2.0 ? 10(-8)). Focusing our analysis on coding sequence variants in 63 genes with preferential kidney expression we identify two rare missense variants SLC34A1 p.Tyr489Cys (OR=2.38, P=2.8 ? 10(-5)) and TRPV5 p.Leu530Arg (OR=3.62, P=4.1 ? 10(-5)) associating with recurrent kidney stones. We also observe associations of the identified kidney stone variants with biochemical traits in a large population set, indicating potential biological mechanism.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26272126 View in PubMed
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A common inversion under selection in Europeans.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29953
Source
Nat Genet. 2005 Feb;37(2):129-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2005
Author
Hreinn Stefansson
Agnar Helgason
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir
Gisli Masson
John Barnard
Adam Baker
Aslaug Jonasdottir
Andres Ingason
Vala G Gudnadottir
Natasa Desnica
Andrew Hicks
Arnaldur Gylfason
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Gudrun M Jonsdottir
Jesus Sainz
Kari Agnarsson
Birgitta Birgisdottir
Shyamali Ghosh
Adalheidur Olafsdottir
Jean-Baptiste Cazier
Kristleifur Kristjansson
Michael L Frigge
Thorgeir E Thorgeirsson
Jeffrey R Gulcher
Augustine Kong
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
deCODE Genetics, Sturlugata 8, 101 Reykjavík, Iceland.
Source
Nat Genet. 2005 Feb;37(2):129-37
Date
Feb-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Gene Frequency
Haplotypes
Humans
Iceland
Inversion, Chromosome
Molecular Sequence Data
Phylogeny
Physical Chromosome Mapping
Polymorphism, Genetic
Recombination, Genetic
Selection (Genetics)
Abstract
A refined physical map of chromosome 17q21.31 uncovered a 900-kb inversion polymorphism. Chromosomes with the inverted segment in different orientations represent two distinct lineages, H1 and H2, that have diverged for as much as 3 million years and show no evidence of having recombined. The H2 lineage is rare in Africans, almost absent in East Asians but found at a frequency of 20% in Europeans, in whom the haplotype structure is indicative of a history of positive selection. Here we show that the H2 lineage is undergoing positive selection in the Icelandic population, such that carrier females have more children and have higher recombination rates than noncarriers.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Genet. 2005 Feb;37(2):10715678132
Comment In: Nat Genet. 2005 Feb;37(2):115-615678139
PubMed ID
15654335 View in PubMed
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Common sequence variants in the LOXL1 gene confer susceptibility to exfoliation glaucoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161963
Source
Science. 2007 Sep 7;317(5843):1397-400
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-2007
Author
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Kristinn P Magnusson
Patrick Sulem
G Bragi Walters
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Hreinn Stefansson
Thorlakur Jonsson
Adalbjorg Jonasdottir
Aslaug Jonasdottir
Gerdur Stefansdottir
Gisli Masson
Gudmundur A Hardarson
Hjorvar Petursson
Arsaell Arnarsson
Mehdi Motallebipour
Ola Wallerman
Claes Wadelius
Jeffrey R Gulcher
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Augustine Kong
Fridbert Jonasson
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
deCODE genetics Inc, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Science. 2007 Sep 7;317(5843):1397-400
Date
Sep-7-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - metabolism
Amino Acid Oxidoreductases - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Chi-Square Distribution
Exfoliation Syndrome - genetics
Female
Gene Expression
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Glaucoma - genetics
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - genetics
Humans
Iceland
Male
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Abstract
Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness. A genome-wide search yielded multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 15q24.1 region associated with glaucoma. Further investigation revealed that the association is confined to exfoliation glaucoma (XFG). Two nonsynonymous SNPs in exon 1 of the gene LOXL1 explain the association, and the data suggest that they confer risk of XFG mainly through exfoliation syndrome (XFS). About 25% of the general population is homozygous for the highest-risk haplotype, and their risk of suffering from XFG is more than 100 times that of individuals carrying only low-risk haplotypes. The population-attributable risk is more than 99%. The product of LOXL1 catalyzes the formation of elastin fibers found to be a major component of the lesions in XFG.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Ophthalmol. 2007 Dec;144(6):974-97518036875
PubMed ID
17690259 View in PubMed
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A common variant associated with prostate cancer in European and African populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76136
Source
Nat Genet. 2006 May 7;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-7-2006
Author
Laufey T Amundadottir
Patrick Sulem
Julius Gudmundsson
Agnar Helgason
Adam Baker
Bjarni A Agnarsson
Asgeir Sigurdsson
Kristrun R Benediktsdottir
Jean-Baptiste Cazier
Jesus Sainz
Margret Jakobsdottir
Jelena Kostic
Droplaug N Magnusdottir
Shyamali Ghosh
Kari Agnarsson
Birgitta Birgisdottir
Louise Le Roux
Adalheidur Olafsdottir
Thorarinn Blondal
Margret Andresdottir
Olafia Svandis Gretarsdottir
Jon T Bergthorsson
Daniel Gudbjartsson
Arnaldur Gylfason
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Andrei Manolescu
Kristleifur Kristjansson
Gudmundur Geirsson
Helgi Isaksson
Julie Douglas
Jan-Erik Johansson
Katarina Bälter
Fredrik Wiklund
James E Montie
Xiaoying Yu
Brian K Suarez
Carole Ober
Kathleen A Cooney
Henrik Gronberg
William J Catalona
Gudmundur V Einarsson
Rosa B Barkardottir
Jeffrey R Gulcher
Augustine Kong
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
[1] deCODE genetics, Sturlugata 8, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland. [2] These authors contributed equally to this work.
Source
Nat Genet. 2006 May 7;
Date
May-7-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
With the increasing incidence of prostate cancer, identifying common genetic variants that confer risk of the disease is important. Here we report such a variant on chromosome 8q24, a region initially identified through a study of Icelandic families. Allele -8 of the microsatellite DG8S737 was associated with prostate cancer in three case-control series of European ancestry from Iceland, Sweden and the US. The estimated odds ratio (OR) of the allele is 1.62 (P = 2.7 x 10(-11)). About 19% of affected men and 13% of the general population carry at least one copy, yielding a population attributable risk (PAR) of approximately 8%. The association was also replicated in an African American case-control group with a similar OR, in which 41% of affected individuals and 30% of the population are carriers. This leads to a greater estimated PAR (16%) that may contribute to higher incidence of prostate cancer in African American men than in men of European ancestry.
PubMed ID
16682969 View in PubMed
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Discovery of common variants associated with low TSH levels and thyroid cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127768
Source
Nat Genet. 2012 Mar;44(3):319-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Julius Gudmundsson
Patrick Sulem
Daniel F Gudbjartsson
Jon G Jonasson
Gisli Masson
Huiling He
Aslaug Jonasdottir
Asgeir Sigurdsson
Simon N Stacey
Hrefna Johannsdottir
Hafdis Th Helgadottir
Wei Li
Rebecca Nagy
Matthew D Ringel
Richard T Kloos
Marieke C H de Visser
Theo S Plantinga
Martin den Heijer
Esperanza Aguillo
Angeles Panadero
Enrique Prats
Almudena Garcia-Castaño
Ana De Juan
Fernando Rivera
G Bragi Walters
Hjordis Bjarnason
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Gudmundur I Eyjolfsson
Unnur S Bjornsdottir
Hilma Holm
Isleifur Olafsson
Kristleifur Kristjansson
Hoskuldur Kristvinsson
Olafur T Magnusson
Gudmar Thorleifsson
Jeffrey R Gulcher
Augustine Kong
Lambertus A L M Kiemeney
Thorvaldur Jonsson
Hannes Hjartarson
Jose I Mayordomo
Romana T Netea-Maier
Albert de la Chapelle
Jon Hrafnkelsson
Unnur Thorsteinsdottir
Thorunn Rafnar
Kari Stefansson
Author Affiliation
deCODE Genetics, Reykjavik, Iceland. julius.gudmundsson@decode.is
Source
Nat Genet. 2012 Mar;44(3):319-22
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 14 - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 2 - genetics
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8 - genetics
Genetic Loci - genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease - genetics
Genetic Variation
Genome-Wide Association Study
Genotype
Humans
Iceland
Neuregulin-1 - blood - genetics
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Thyroid Neoplasms - genetics
Thyrotropin - metabolism
Abstract
To search for sequence variants conferring risk of nonmedullary thyroid cancer, we focused our analysis on 22 SNPs with a P
Notes
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PubMed ID
22267200 View in PubMed
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