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Alcohol, smoking, and drug use among Inuit women of childbearing age during pregnancy and the risk to children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136911
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 Jun;35(6):1081-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Gina Muckle
Dominique Laflamme
Jocelyne Gagnon
Olivier Boucher
Joseph L Jacobson
Sandra W Jacobson
Author Affiliation
Public Health Research Unit, CHUQ-Laval University Medical Research Center, Quebec City, QC, Canada. gina.muckle@psy.ulaval.ca
Source
Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2011 Jun;35(6):1081-91
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - ethnology
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders - ethnology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - ethnology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - ethnology - etiology
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - ethnology
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - ethnology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - ethnology
Young Adult
Abstract
Alcohol consumption during pregnancy, a known teratogen often associated with drug use and smoking is a well-known public health concern.
This study provides prevalence data for alcohol, smoking, and illicit drug use before, during, and after pregnancy among Inuit. Factors associated with alcohol use are also identified.
Two hundred and eight Inuit women from Arctic Quebec were interviewed at mid-pregnancy, and at 1 and 11 months postpartum to provide descriptive data on smoking, alcohol, and drug use during pregnancy, and the year before and after pregnancy. Sociodemographic and family characteristics potentially associated with alcohol use were documented.
Ninety-two percent of the women reported smoking and 61% reported drinking during pregnancy. Episodes of binging during pregnancy were reported by 62% of the alcohol users, which correspond to 38% of pregnant women. Thirty-six percent of the participants reported using marijuana during pregnancy. Alcohol use and binge drinking during pregnancy were more likely to be reported by women who lived in less crowded houses, had a better knowledge of a second language, drank alcohol more often and in larger amounts prior to pregnancy, and used illicit drugs. Binge drinkers were more likely to be single women and to have had fewer previous pregnancies. Postpartum distress and violence were more likely to be experienced by women who used alcohol during pregnancy. Binge drinking during pregnancy was best predicted by drinking habits before pregnancy, maternal symptoms of depression, the use of illicit drugs during pregnancy, and the number of young children living with the mother.
These results confirm that alcohol is a major risk factor to maternal and child health in this population, underscoring the need for culturally relevant and effective prevention programs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21332531 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use among Inuit pregnant women: Validity of alcohol ascertainment measures over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292590
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2017 Nov; 64:73-78
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Marilyn Fortin
Gina Muckle
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Richard E Bélanger
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; Douglas Mental Health University Institute, Montreal, QC, Canada. Electronic address: marilyn.fortin@douglas.mcgill.ca.
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2017 Nov; 64:73-78
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Binge Drinking - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Inuits
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Frequency and quantity of alcohol consumed by women are two important indicators of the risks associated with drinking during pregnancy. Some studies have compared the validity of maternal alcohol report obtained during and after pregnancy. However, to date none have examined alcohol use in a Native Canadian population, such as the Inuit. Effective measurement methods are necessary to better understand why children from some communities seem at increased risk of alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders.
Prospective and retrospective drinking interviews were obtained from a sub-sample of 67 women included in the Nunavik Child Development Study (NCDS), Nunavik, Canada (1995-2010; N=248). Number of days of alcohol consumption and binge drinking (five drinks or more per episode) across pregnancy as well as ounces of absolute alcohol per day and per drinking day among users were collected using timeline follow-back interviews administered both during pregnancy and again 11years after delivery. Consistency of alcohol reports over time, as well as significant differences for alcohol quantities described by users between interviews were examined. Sociodemographic characteristics associated with alcohol use reports were also assessed.
The proportion of positive reports of alcohol and binge drinking during pregnancy was higher when women were interviewed prospectively during pregnancy than retrospectively. We observed a fair to moderate agreement of alcohol report between interview periods. By contrast, the number of binge drinking days during pregnancy was slightly higher among alcohol users when documented retrospectively.
Our findings endorse the conclusion that prospective alcohol measures provide more reliable ascertainment and likely generate more valid information about the proportion of children prenatally exposed to alcohol in the Inuit population.
PubMed ID
29079497 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use among Inuit pregnant women: Validity of alcohol ascertainment measures over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286836
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2017 Oct 24;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-24-2017
Author
Marilyn Fortin
Gina Muckle
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Richard E Bélanger
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2017 Oct 24;
Date
Oct-24-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Frequency and quantity of alcohol consumed by women are two important indicators of the risks associated with drinking during pregnancy. Some studies have compared the validity of maternal alcohol report obtained during and after pregnancy. However, to date none have examined alcohol use in a Native Canadian population, such as the Inuit. Effective measurement methods are necessary to better understand why children from some communities seem at increased risk of alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorders.
Prospective and retrospective drinking interviews were obtained from a sub-sample of 67 women included in the Nunavik Child Development Study (NCDS), Nunavik, Canada (1995-2010; N=248). Number of days of alcohol consumption and binge drinking (five drinks or more per episode) across pregnancy as well as ounces of absolute alcohol per day and per drinking day among users were collected using timeline follow-back interviews administered both during pregnancy and again 11years after delivery. Consistency of alcohol reports over time, as well as significant differences for alcohol quantities described by users between interviews were examined. Sociodemographic characteristics associated with alcohol use reports were also assessed.
The proportion of positive reports of alcohol and binge drinking during pregnancy was higher when women were interviewed prospectively during pregnancy than retrospectively. We observed a fair to moderate agreement of alcohol report between interview periods. By contrast, the number of binge drinking days during pregnancy was slightly higher among alcohol users when documented retrospectively.
Our findings endorse the conclusion that prospective alcohol measures provide more reliable ascertainment and likely generate more valid information about the proportion of children prenatally exposed to alcohol in the Inuit population.
PubMed ID
29079497 View in PubMed
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Altered fine motor function at school age in Inuit children exposed to PCBs, methylmercury, and lead.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275653
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Aug 26;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2016
  1 document  
Author
Olivier Boucher
Gina Muckle
Pierre Ayotte
Eric Dewailly
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Source
Environ Int. 2016 Aug 26;
Date
Aug-26-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
371758
Abstract
Motor deficits have frequently been reported in methylmercury (MeHg) poisoning in adults. However, whether exposure to neurotoxic contaminants from environmental sources early in life is associated with neuromotor impairments has received relatively little attention. This study examines the relation of developmental exposure to MeHg, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and lead to motor function in school-age Inuit children exposed through their traditional diet.
In a prospective study in Nunavik, children (mean age=11.3years) were assessed on a battery of fine motor tasks, namely the Stanford-Binet Copying subtest (N=262), the Santa Ana Form Board, and the Finger Tapping Test (N=215). The relation of mercury (Hg; as an index of MeHg exposure), PCB congener 153 (PCB153), and lead concentrations in cord and current blood samples to task performance was examined using linear regression analyses.
After adjustment for potential confounders and control for the other contaminants, higher current PCB concentrations were associated with poorer Santa Ana Form Board and Finger Tapping performance. Results were virtually identical when PCB153 was replaced by other PCB congeners. Higher current Hg levels were independently associated with poorer Finger Tapping performance.
This is the first prospective longitudinal study in children to provide evidence of neuromotor impairments associated with postnatal exposure to seafood contaminants from environmental sources. Fine motor speed appears particularly sensitive to the effects of postnatal PCB exposure, which is unusually high in this population. Results with postnatal MeHg are concordant with previous cross-sectional studies with children and adults.
PubMed ID
27575364 View in PubMed
Documents
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Assessing new dimensions of attentional functions in children prenatally exposed to environmental contaminants using an adapted Posner paradigm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265112
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2015 Jul 30;51:27-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-30-2015
Author
Audrey-Anne Ethier
Gina Muckle
Sandra W Jacobson
Pierre Ayotte
Joseph L Jacobson
Dave Saint-Amour
Source
Neurotoxicol Teratol. 2015 Jul 30;51:27-34
Date
Jul-30-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Chronic exposure to methylmercury (MeHg), lead (Pb) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) has been associated with a range of attention deficits in children, but it is not known whether selective spatial attention is also altered. We modified the classic Posner paradigm, which assesses visuospatial attention, to also assess vigilance and impulsivity. This paradigm is based on the well-documented findings that a target will be detected more quickly if a visual cue indicates beforehand where it will appear, and more slowly if the cue indicates a false spatial location. In our task, visual distractors were introduced, in addition to the classic Posner trials, to assess impulsivity, and a central smiley face, whose eye-movement cued the location of the targets, to measure spatial attention. This task was administered to 27 school-age Inuit children (mean age=11.2years) from Nunavik (Arctic Quebec, Canada), in which pre- and postnatal exposures to environmental contaminants had been documented from birth. After controlling for the impact of confounding variables, multivariable regressions revealed that prenatal exposures to PCBs and Pb were significantly associated with greater inattention and impulsivity, respectively, while current exposure to Pb was significantly associated with longer reaction times. Although a significant correlation was observed between cord blood PCB concentration and decreased visuospatial performance, no significant association was found after adjustment for confounders. No effect was found for Hg exposures. These results suggest that our adapted Posner paradigm is sensitive in detecting a range of attention deficits in children exposed to environmental contaminants; implications for future studies are discussed.
PubMed ID
26235045 View in PubMed
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Association between early lead exposure and externalizing behaviors in adolescence: A developmental cascade.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302836
Source
Environ Res. 2019 Nov; 178:108679
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2019
Author
Mireille Desrochers-Couture
Yohann Courtemanche
Nadine Forget-Dubois
Richard E Bélanger
Olivier Boucher
Pierre Ayotte
Sylvaine Cordier
Joseph L Jacobson
Sandra W Jacobson
Gina Muckle
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada.
Source
Environ Res. 2019 Nov; 178:108679
Date
Nov-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Lead (Pb) exposure is associated with adverse neurological development. Most notably, it has been observed through externalizing behavior symptoms, as observed among Inuit children from northern Québec. Evidence for a persistent neurological impact of early Pb exposure later in life is however scarce. Pb exposure may initiate a developmental cascade that increases the risk of long-term behavior problems.
Testing for direct associations between childhood Pb concentrations and adolescent externalizing symptoms and substance use, as well as indirect associations through childhood behavior assessments.
The study sample is a longitudinal cohort of Inuit children (n?=?212) followed since birth. Blood Pb concentrations were measured during childhood (median age?=?11.4 years) and adolescence (median age?=?18.5 years). Externalizing/inattentive behavior were teacher-assessed through the Teacher Report Form and the Disruptive Behavior Disorders Rating Scale for children. At the adolescence follow-up, behavior problems were self-reported by filling Achenbach's Youth Self-Report, the Barkley Adult ADHD-IV Rating Scale, and the Diagnostics Interview Schedule for Children. Adolescent substance use was also self-assessed through the DEP-ADO. Direct and indirect associations of child Pb concentrations with adolescent outcomes were tested through mediation models.
Child blood Pb concentrations were not directly associated with any adolescent outcomes. On the contrary, childhood Pb exposure was indirectly associated, through childhood externalizing behavior assessments, with adolescent externalizing behaviors, binge drinking, and cannabis use. These indirect associations held after controlling for adolescents' concurrent Pb blood concentrations.
Our results highlight the indirect but lasting effects of child Pb exposure on adolescent behavior problems, and the importance of childhood externalizing behavior in this relationship. Adverse early-life environment put children on a riskier developmental trajectory, increasing their likelihood of lifelong psychological, social and health problems.
PubMed ID
31454729 View in PubMed
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Branched-chain and aromatic amino acids in relation to behavioral problems among young Inuit from Nunavik, Canada: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291899
Source
Pediatr Res. 2017 Sep; 82(3):416-422
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2017
Author
Audray St-Jean
Salma Meziou
Cynthia Roy
Pierre Ayotte
Gina Muckle
Michel Lucas
Author Affiliation
Population Health and Optimal Health Practices Research Unit, CHU de Québec-Université Laval, Québec, Canada.
Source
Pediatr Res. 2017 Sep; 82(3):416-422
Date
Sep-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Amino Acids, Aromatic - metabolism
Amino Acids, Branched-Chain - metabolism
Child
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Inuits
Male
Nunavut
Problem behavior
Abstract
BackgroundObesity and insulin resistance are linked with mood disorders, and elevated concentrations of branched-chain (BCAAs) and aromatic amino acids (AAAs). Our study aimed to prospectively assess the relationship between childhood plasma BCAAs and AAAs, and behavioral problems in young Inuit from Nunavik.MethodsWe analyzed data on 181 children (with a mean age of 11.4 years at baseline) involved in the Nunavik Child Development Study. Plasma BCAA and AAA concentrations were measured in childhood (2005-2010). BCAA/AAA tertiles-the ratio of total BCAAs to AAAs-were considered as surrogate categorical independent variables. Behavioral problems were assessed with the Youth Self-Report (YSR) from the Child Behavior Checklist about 7 years later during adolescence (2013-2016). ANOVA ascertained relationships between BCAA/AAA tertiles and YSR outcomes.ResultsAscending BCAA/AAA tertiles were positively associated (Ptrend
Notes
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PubMed ID
28486439 View in PubMed
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Branched-chain and aromatic amino acids in relation to behavioral problems among young Inuit from Nunavik, Canada: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282388
Source
Pediatr Res. 2017 May 09;
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-09-2017
Author
Audray St-Jean
Salma Meziou
Cynthia Roy
Pierre Ayotte
Gina Muckle
Michel Lucas
Source
Pediatr Res. 2017 May 09;
Date
May-09-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
BACKGROUNDObesity and insulin resistance are linked with mood disorders, and elevated concentrations of branched-chain (BCAAs) and aromatic amino acids (AAAs). Our study aimed to prospectively assess the relationship between childhood plasma BCAAs and AAAs and behavioral problems in young Inuit from Nunavik.METHODSWe analyzed data on 181 children (mean age 11.4 years at baseline) involved in the Nunavik Child Development Study. Plasma BCAA and AAA concentrations were measured in childhood (2005-2010). BCAA/AAA tertiles - the ratio of total BCAAs to AAAs-were considered as a surrogate categorical independent variable. Behavioral problems were assessed with the Youth Self-Report (YSR) from the Child Behavior Checklist about 7 years later during adolescence (2013-2016). ANOVA ascertained relationships between BCAA/AAA tertiles and YSR outcomes.RESULTSAscending BCAA/AAA tertiles were positively associated (Ptrend
PubMed ID
28486439 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cardiac autonomic activity and blood pressure among Inuit children exposed to mercury.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118263
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2012 Oct;33(5):1067-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Beatriz Valera
Gina Muckle
Paul Poirier
Sandra W Jacobson
Joseph L Jacobson
Eric Dewailly
Author Affiliation
CHUQ Medical Research Center. Quebec, Canada.
Source
Neurotoxicology. 2012 Oct;33(5):1067-74
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autonomic Nervous System - drug effects - physiopathology
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Canada - epidemiology - ethnology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Pollutants - blood - toxicity
Epidemiological Monitoring
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - metabolism
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits - ethnology
Linear Models
Male
Mercury - blood - toxicity
Nutrition Assessment
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - metabolism
Sex Factors
Abstract
Studies conducted in the Faeroe Islands and Japan suggest a negative impact of mercury on heart rate variability (HRV) among children while the results regarding blood pressure (BP) are less consistent.
To assess the impact of mercury on HRV and BP among Nunavik Inuit children.
A cohort of 226 children was followed from birth to 11 years old. Mercury concentration in cord blood and in blood and hair at 11 years old were used as markers of prenatal and childhood exposure, respectively. HRV was measured using ambulatory 2 h-Holter monitoring while BP was measured through a standardized protocol. Simple regression was used to assess the relationship of mercury to BP and HRV parameters. Multiple linear regressions were performed adjusting for covariates such as age, sex, birth weight, body mass index (BMI), height, total n-3 fatty acids, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB 153), lead, selenium and maternal smoking during pregnancy.
Median cord blood mercury and blood mercury levels at 11 years old were 81.5 nmoL/L (IQR:45.0?140.0) and 14.5 nmol/L (IQR: 7.5?28.0), respectively. After adjusting for the covariates, child blood mercury was associated with low frequency (LF) (b = 0.21, p = 0.05), the standard deviation of R?R intervals (SDNN) (b = 0.26, p = 0.02), the standard deviation of R?R intervals measured over 5 min periods (SDANN) (b = 0.31, p = 0.01) and the coefficient of variation of R?R intervals (CVRR) (b = 0.06,p = 0.02). No significant association was observed with BP.
Mercury exposure during childhood seems to affect HRV among Nunavik Inuit children at school age.
PubMed ID
23227484 View in PubMed
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Cohort profile: the maternal-infant research on environmental chemicals research platform.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113014
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2013 Jul;27(4):415-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Tye E Arbuckle
William D Fraser
Mandy Fisher
Karelyn Davis
Chun Lei Liang
Nicole Lupien
Stéphanie Bastien
Maria P Velez
Peter von Dadelszen
Denise G Hemmings
Jingwei Wang
Michael Helewa
Shayne Taback
Mathew Sermer
Warren Foster
Greg Ross
Paul Fredette
Graeme Smith
Mark Walker
Roberta Shear
Linda Dodds
Adrienne S Ettinger
Jean-Philippe Weber
Monique D'Amour
Melissa Legrand
Premkumari Kumarathasan
Renaud Vincent
Zhong-Cheng Luo
Robert W Platt
Grant Mitchell
Nick Hidiroglou
Kevin Cockell
Maya Villeneuve
Dorothea F K Rawn
Robert Dabeka
Xu-Liang Cao
Adam Becalski
Nimal Ratnayake
Genevieve Bondy
Xiaolei Jin
Zhongwen Wang
Sheryl Tittlemier
Pierre Julien
Denise Avard
Hope Weiler
Alain Leblanc
Gina Muckle
Michel Boivin
Ginette Dionne
Pierre Ayotte
Bruce Lanphear
Jean R Séguin
Dave Saint-Amour
Eric Dewailly
Patricia Monnier
Gideon Koren
Emmanuel Ouellet
Author Affiliation
Population Studies Division, Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa. tye.arbuckle@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2013 Jul;27(4):415-25
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Biological Markers
Canada
Cohort Studies
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant Welfare
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects - chemically induced
Questionnaires
Young Adult
Abstract
The Maternal-Infant Research on Environmental Chemicals (MIREC) Study was established to obtain Canadian biomonitoring data for pregnant women and their infants, and to examine potential adverse health effects of prenatal exposure to priority environmental chemicals on pregnancy and infant health.
Women were recruited during the first trimester from 10 sites across Canada and were followed through delivery. Questionnaires were administered during pregnancy and post-delivery to collect information on demographics, occupation, life style, medical history, environmental exposures and diet. Information on the pregnancy and the infant was abstracted from medical charts. Maternal blood, urine, hair and breast milk, as well as cord blood and infant meconium, were collected and analysed for an extensive list of environmental biomarkers and nutrients. Additional biospecimens were stored in the study's Biobank. The MIREC Research Platform encompasses the main cohort study, the Biobank and follow-up studies.
Of the 8716 women approached at early prenatal clinics, 5108 were eligible and 2001 agreed to participate (39%). MIREC participants tended to smoke less (5.9% vs. 10.5%), be older (mean 32.2 vs. 29.4 years) and have a higher education (62.3% vs. 35.1% with a university degree) than women giving birth in Canada.
The MIREC Study, while smaller in number of participants than several of the international cohort studies, has one of the most comprehensive datasets on prenatal exposure to multiple environmental chemicals. The biomonitoring data and biological specimen bank will make this research platform a significant resource for examining potential adverse health effects of prenatal exposure to environmental chemicals.
PubMed ID
23772943 View in PubMed
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45 records – page 1 of 5.