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Chronic liver disease in Aboriginal North Americans

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92526
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2008 Aug 7;14(29):4607-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-7-2008
Author
Scott, JD
Garland, N
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, University of Washington, Harborview Medical Center, 325 Ninth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98144, USA. jdscott@u.washington.edu
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2008 Aug 7;14(29):4607-15
Date
Aug-7-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chronic Disease
Hepatitis C - complications
Humans
Indians, North American - ethnology
Liver Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Liver Diseases, Alcoholic - complications
North America - epidemiology
Prevalence
Abstract
A structured literature review was performed to detail the frequency and etiology of chronic liver disease (CLD) in Aboriginal North Americans. CLD affects Aboriginal North Americans disproportionately and is now one of the most common causes of death. Alcoholic liver disease is the leading etiology of CLD, but viral hepatitis, particularly hepatitis C, is an important and growing cause of CLD. High rates of autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) are reported in regions of coastal British Columbia and southeastern Alaska. Non-alcoholic liver disease is a common, but understudied, cause of CLD. Future research should monitor the incidence and etiology of CLD and should be geographically inclusive. In addition, more research is needed on the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in this population.
PubMed ID
18698674 View in PubMed
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