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Activity-based costing in radiology. Application in a pediatric radiological unit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32870
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J. Laurila
I. Suramo
M. Brommels
E M Tolppanen
P. Koivukangas
P. Lanning
G. Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Mar;41(2):189-95
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Cost Savings
Costs and Cost Analysis
Health Care Rationing - economics
Hospital Costs - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Pediatrics - economics
Radiology Department, Hospital - economics
Time and Motion Studies
Abstract
PURPOSE: To get an informative and detailed picture of the resource utilization in a radiology department in order to support its pricing and management. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A system based mainly on the theoretical foundations of activity-based costing (ABC) was designed, tested and compared with conventional costing. The study was performed at the Pediatric Unit of the Department of Radiology, Oulu University Hospital. The material consisted of all the 7,452 radiological procedures done in the unit during the first half of 1994, when both methods of costing where in use. Detailed cost data were obtained from the hospital financial and personnel systems and then related to activity data captured in the radiology information system. RESULTS: The allocation of overhead costs was greatly reduced by the introduction of ABC compared to conventional costing. The overhead cost as a percentage of total costs dropped to one-fourth of total costs, from 57% to 16%. The change of unit costs of radiological procedures varied from -42% to +82%. CONCLUSION: Costing is much more detailed and precise, and the percentage of unspecified allocated overhead costs diminishes drastically when ABC is used. The new information enhances effective departmental management, as the whole process of radiological procedures is identifiable by single activities, amenable to corrective actions and process improvement.
PubMed ID
10741796 View in PubMed
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Diagnosis of meningeoma. A comparison of costs before CT, during CT and after introduction of MR imaging.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20120
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Nov;41(6):539-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2000
Author
J. Laurila
I. Suramo
M. Brommels
A. Servo
J. Kotikangas
C G Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2000 Nov;41(6):539-43
Date
Nov-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Costs and Cost Analysis
Europe
Female
Humans
Length of Stay
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - economics
Male
Meningeal Neoplasms - diagnosis - economics
Meningioma - diagnosis - economics
Middle Aged
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - economics
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the capital investment required by advances in radiological technology is offset by savings in the direct costs of diagnostic services. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Meningeoma was used as an indicator case. All meningeoma patients from three study periods were included: Twenty patients in 1976-77 before the introduction of CT, 22 patients in 1984-85 when CT was used and 16 patients in 1992 when MR imaging had replaced CT as the most informative imaging modality. Radiological and other diagnostic investigations, and the hospital stay were identified and cost analyzed. RESULTS: The costs of radiological examinations increased from 293 Euros in 1976-77 to 513 Euros in 1992. The average number of diagnostic examinations per patient decreased from 5.1 in 1976 77 to 2.4 in 1992. The length of hospital stay decreased from 11.5 to 2.7 days and the total costs of the diagnostic work-up decreased to one-third of the original, i.e. from 3423 Euros in 1976-77 to 1282 Euros in 1992. CONCLUSION: The costs of the radiological examinations rose, but the development of radiological technology simplified the diagnostic practice. The hospital stay drastically decreased. The total costs of diagnostic work-up per patient dropped to one-third of the baseline costs.
PubMed ID
11092472 View in PubMed
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The efficacy of a continuous quality improvement (CQI) method in a radiological department. Comparison with non-CQI control material.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196040
Source
Acta Radiol. 2001 Jan;42(1):96-100
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2001
Author
J. Laurila
C G Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
I. Suramo
E M Tolppanen
O. Tervonen
O. Korhola
M. Brommels
Author Affiliation
Department of Radiology, Oulu University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Radiol. 2001 Jan;42(1):96-100
Date
Jan-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Finland
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care - methods - trends
Quality Control
Questionnaires
Radiology Department, Hospital - standards - trends
Retrospective Studies
Abstract
To study the efficacy of continuous quality improvement (CQI) compared to ordinary management in an on-duty radiology department.
Because of complaints regarding delivery of on-duty radiological services, an improvement was initiated simultaneously at two hospitals, at the HUCH (Helsinki University Central Hospital) utilising the CQI-method, and at the OUH (Oulu University Hospital) with a traditional management process. For the CQI project, a team was formed to evaluate the process with flow-charts, cause and effect diagrams, Pareto analysis and control charts. Interventions to improve the process were based on the results of these analyses.
The team at the HUCH implemented the following changes: A radiologist was added to the evening shift between 15:00-22:00 and a radiographer was moved from the morning shift to 15:00-22:00. A clear improvement was achieved in the turn-around time, but in the follow-up some of the gains were lost. Only minimal changes were achieved at the OUH, where the intervention was based on traditional management processes.
CQI was an effective method for improving the quality of performance of a radiology department compared with ordinary management methods, but some of this improvement may be subsequently lost without a continuous measurement system.
PubMed ID
11167340 View in PubMed
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Mammography of symptomatic breasts. A report on 1119 consecutive patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246270
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1980;69(2):48-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
C G Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
U. Svinhufvud
Source
Ann Chir Gynaecol. 1980;69(2):48-53
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Biopsy, Needle
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mammography
Middle Aged
Abstract
Two-picture mammography was performed as a routine diagnostic measure in the evaluation of 1119 consecutive patients (97.9% of which were women), who attended the hospital with breast symptoms 67.8% also had fine needle aspiration biopsy. The sensitivity of mammography in diagnosing the 97 carcinomas was 91.8%, the specificity was 95.6%. The false negative findings on mammography constituted 8.2% of the 97 carcinomas, aspiration biopsy was falsely negative in 25.7% of 70 carcinomas. Mammography was found to be valuable in distinguishing malignant from benign lesions with a high degree of accuracy, in localizing both palpable and occult lesions prior to aspiration or open biopsy, as well as in demonstrating the entire symptomatic breast and also the other breast for diagnosis. Of all the women 23.6% were under 30 years of age, but in this group only one carcinoma was found. It is suggested that mammography should not be performed in women with breast symptoms under 30, unless ther is suspicion of malignancy. Mammography of both breast should, on the other hand, be performed in all those over 30 years.
PubMed ID
7377735 View in PubMed
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Regional gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid distributions in schizophrenic patients, their siblings, and controls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203575
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1998 Dec;55(12):1084-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
T D Cannon
T G van Erp
M. Huttunen
J. Lönnqvist
O. Salonen
L. Valanne
V P Poutanen
C G Standertskjöld-Nordenstam
R E Gur
M. Yan
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104-6196, USA. cannon@hirisk.psych.upenn.edu
Source
Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1998 Dec;55(12):1084-91
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Brain - anatomy & histology
Cerebral Ventricles - anatomy & histology
Cerebrospinal Fluid - physiology
Family
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Frontal Lobe - anatomy & histology
Functional Laterality
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Phenotype
Psychotic Disorders - cerebrospinal fluid - diagnosis - genetics
Sampling Studies
Schizophrenia - cerebrospinal fluid - diagnosis - genetics
Sex Factors
Temporal Lobe - anatomy & histology
Abstract
Cortical gray matter volume reductions and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume increases are robust correlates of schizophrenia, but their sources have not been established conclusively.
Structured diagnostic interviews and magnetic resonance imaging scans of the brain were obtained on 75 psychotic probands (63 with schizophrenia and 12 with schizoaffective disorder), ascertained so as to be representative of all such probands in a Helsinki, Finland, birth cohort; 60 of their nonpsychotic full siblings; and 56 demographically similar control subjects without a personal or family history of treated psychiatric morbidity.
Patients with schizophrenia and their siblings exhibited significant reductions in cortical gray matter volume and significant increases in sulcal CSF volume compared with controls. The patients, but not their siblings, also exhibited significant reductions in white matter volume and significant increases in ventricular CSF volume. Regional effects were most robust when component volumes were expressed as percentages of overall regional volumes; in this case, for patient and sibling groups, gray matter volume reductions and sulcal CSF volume increases were significantly more pronounced in the frontal and temporal lobes than in the remainder of the brain. None of the group differences varied significantly by sex or hemisphere.
Structural alterations of the cerebral cortex, particularly in the frontal and temporal lobes, are present in patients with schizophrenia and in some of their siblings without schizophrenia; such changes are thus likely to reflect genetic (or shared environmental) effects. Ventricular enlargement is unique to the clinical phenotype and is thus likely to be affected primarily by nonshared causative factors.
PubMed ID
9862551 View in PubMed
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