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Comparison of telephone versus face-to-face interviews in the assessment of dietary intake by the 24-hour recall EPIC SOFT programme--the Norwegian calibration study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9843
Source
IARC Sci Publ. 2002;156:17-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002

Comparison of telephone vs face-to-face interviews in the assessment of dietary intake by the 24 h recall EPIC SOFT program--the Norwegian calibration study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18665
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jan;57(1):107-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
M. Brustad
G. Skeie
T. Braaten
N. Slimani
E. Lund
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Norway. magritt.brustad@ism.uit.no
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jan;57(1):107-13
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Calibration
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Effect Modifiers (Epidemiology)
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Interviews - methods - standards
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Norway
Nutrition Assessment
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare food group intakes in grams, total energy and energy contribution from macronutrients between two random samples of women, using a standardized computer program (EPIC SOFT) with either a face-to-face or a telephone 24 h recall interview design. METHODS: Two groups of Norwegian women living in Tromsø were drawn at random from the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study (NOWAC) cohort. The EPIC SOFT computer program was used to conduct single 24 h dietary recalls either by telephone or face to face. For the latter, 160 women were invited, of whom 111 responded positively (crude response rate=69.4%) and 102 were interviewed. For the telephone option, 180 were invited to participate, 109 responded positively (crude response rate=60.6%) and 103 were interviewed. RESULTS: The two groups of women were similar with respect to age, body mass index, basal metabolic rate, smoking, education, physical activity and special diet status. No statistically significant difference in dietary intake was found between interviews conducted by telephone and face-to-face, except for 'egg and egg products' (P
PubMed ID
12548305 View in PubMed
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Consumption of added fats and oils in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) centres across 10 European countries as assessed by 24-hour dietary recalls.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18552
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
J. Linseisen
E. Bergström
L. Gafá
C A González
A. Thiébaut
A. Trichopoulou
R. Tumino
C. Navarro Sánchez
C. Martínez Garcia
I. Mattisson
S. Nilsson
A. Welch
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
E. Kesse
A B Miller
M. Schulz
K. Botsi
A. Naska
S. Sieri
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
G. Skeie
D. Engeset
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Unit of Human Nutrition and Cancer Prevention, Technical University of Munich, Alte Akademie 16, D-85350 Freising-Weihenstephan, Germany. j.linseisen@wzw.tum.de
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1227-42
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Educational Status
Energy intake
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the consumption of added fats and oils across the European centres and countries participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). DESIGN AND SETTING: 24-Hour dietary recalls were collected by means of standardised computer-guided interviews in 27 redefined EPIC centres across 10 European countries. SUBJECTS: From an initial number of 36 900 subjects, single dietary recalls from 22 924 women and 13 031 men in the age range of 35-74 years were included. RESULTS: Mean daily intake of added fats and oils varied between 16.2 g (Varese, Italy) and 41.1 g (Malmö, Sweden) in women and between 24.7 g (Ragusa, Italy) and 66.0 g (Potsdam, Germany) in men. Total mean lipid intake by consumption of added fats and oils, including those used for sauce preparation, ranged between 18.3 (Norway) and 37.2 g day-1 (Greece) in women and 28.4 (Heidelberg, Germany) and 51.2 g day-1 (Greece) in men. The Mediterranean EPIC centres with high olive oil consumption combined with low animal fat intake contrasted with the central and northern European centres where fewer vegetable oils, more animal fats and a high proportion of margarine were consumed. The consumption of added fats and oils of animal origin was highest in the German EPIC centres, followed by the French. The contribution of added fats and oils to total energy intake ranged from 8% in Norway to 22% in Greece. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate a high variation in dietary intake of added fats and oils in EPIC, providing a good opportunity to elucidate the role of dietary fats in cancer aetiology.
PubMed ID
12639229 View in PubMed
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Consumption of dairy products in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: data from 35 955 24-hour dietary recalls in 10 European countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18551
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
A. Hjartåker
A. Lagiou
N. Slimani
E. Lund
M D Chirlaque
E. Vasilopoulou
X. Zavitsanos
F. Berrino
C. Sacerdote
M C Ocké
P H M Peeters
D. Engeset
G. Skeie
A. Aller
P. Amiano
G. Berglund
S. Nilsson
A. McTaggart
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
M. Schulz
B. Hemon
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Section of Medical Statistics, University of Oslo, PO Box 1122, Blindern, N-0317 Norway. anette.hjartaker@basalmed.uio.no
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1259-71
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet Surveys
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To describe and compare the consumption of dairy products in cohorts included in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Data from single 24-hour dietary recall interviews collected through a highly standardised computer-based program (EPIC-SOFT) in 27 redefined centres in 10 European countries between 1995 and 2000. From a total random sample of 36 900, 22 924 women and 13 031 men were selected after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age. RESULTS: A high total consumption of dairy products was reported in most of the centres in Spain and in the UK cohort sampled from the general population, as well as in the Dutch, Swedish and Danish centres. A somewhat low consumption was reported in the Greek centre and in some of the Italian centres (Ragusa and Turin). In all centres and for both sexes, milk constituted the dairy sub-group with the largest proportion (in grams) of total dairy consumption, followed by yoghurt and other fermented milk products, and cheese. Still, there was a wide range in the contributions of the different dairy sub-groups between centres. The Spanish and Nordic centres generally reported a high consumption of milk, the Swedish and Dutch centres reported a high consumption of yoghurt and other fermented milk products, whereas the highest consumption of cheese was reported in the French centres. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate both quantitative and qualitative disparities in dairy product consumption among the EPIC centres. This offers a sound starting point for analyses of associations between dairy intake and chronic diseases such as cancer.
PubMed ID
12639231 View in PubMed
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Food sources of carbohydrates in a European cohort of adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18553
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1197-215
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
E. Wirfält
A. McTaggart
V. Pala
B. Gullberg
G. Frasca
S. Panico
H B Bueno-de-Mesquita
P H M Peeters
D. Engeset
G. Skeie
M D Chirlaque
P. Amiano
E. Lundin
A. Mulligan
E A Spencer
K. Overvad
A. Tjønneland
F. Clavel-Chapelon
J. Linseisen
U. Nöthlings
E. Polychronopoulos
K. Georga
U R Charrondière
N. Slimani
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö, SE-20502 Sweden. elisabet.wirfalt@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2002 Dec;5(6B):1197-215
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Europe
Female
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe the average consumption of carbohydrate-providing food groups among study centres of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). METHODS: Of the 27 redefined EPIC study centres, 19 contributed subjects of both genders and eight centres female participants only (men, women, after exclusion of subjects under 35 and over 74 years of age from the original 36 900 total). Dietary data were obtained using the 24-hour recall methodology using the EPIC-SOFT software. The major sources of dietary carbohydrate were identified, and 16 food groups were examined. RESULTS: The 10 food groups contributing most carbohydrate were bread; fruit; milk and milk products; sweet buns, cakes and pies; potato; sugar and jam; pasta and rice; vegetables and legumes; crispbread; and fruit and vegetable juices. Consumption of fruits as well as vegetables and legumes was higher in southern compared with northern centres, while soft drinks consumption was higher in the north. Italian centres had high pasta and rice consumption, but breakfast cereal, potato, and sweet buns, cakes and pies were higher in northern centres. In Sweden, lower bread consumption was balanced with a higher consumption of crispbread, and with sweet buns, cakes and pies. Overall, men consumed higher amounts of vegetables and legumes, bread, soft drinks, potatoes, pasta and rice, breakfast cereal and sugar and jam than women, but fruit consumption appeared more frequent in women. CONCLUSION: The study supports the established idea that carbohydrate-rich foods chosen in northern Europe are different from those in the Mediterranean region. When comparing and interpreting diet-disease relationships across populations, researchers need to consider all types of foods.
PubMed ID
12639227 View in PubMed
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[Health care for patients with mental retardation. Special care--consequences of institutionalization].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230325
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Aug 20;109(23):2334-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-20-1989
Author
G. Skeie
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1989 Aug 20;109(23):2334-5
Date
Aug-20-1989
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Institutionalization
Intellectual Disability - rehabilitation
Norway
PubMed ID
2772902 View in PubMed
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No association between adherence to the healthy Nordic food index and cardiovascular disease amongst Swedish women: a cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269549
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Nov;278(5):531-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2015
Author
N. Roswall
S. Sandin
R. Scragg
M. Löf
G. Skeie
A. Olsen
H-O Adami
E. Weiderpass
Source
J Intern Med. 2015 Nov;278(5):531-41
Date
Nov-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In several intervention trials, a healthy Nordic diet showed beneficial effects on markers of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the association between a healthy Nordic diet and clinical diagnosis of cardiovascular disease.
Our aim was first to examine the association between a healthy Nordic food index (wholegrain bread, oatmeal, apples/pears, root vegetables, cabbages and fish) and the incidence of overall cardiovascular disease (ischaemic heart disease, stroke, arrhythmia, thrombosis and hypertensive disease), and secondly to test for possible effect modification by smoking, body mass index (BMI), alcohol consumption and age.
We conducted an analysis of data from the prospective Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health cohort, including 43 310 women who completed a food frequency questionnaire in 1991-1992, and followed up until 31 December 2012 through Swedish registries. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models.
During follow-up, 8383 women developed cardiovascular disease. We found no association between the healthy Nordic food index and overall cardiovascular disease risk or any of the subgroups investigated. There was a statistically significant interaction with smoking status (P = 0.02), with a beneficial effect only amongst former smokers (HR 0.96, 95% CI 0.94-0.99 per 1-point increment).
The present results do not support an association between a healthy Nordic food index and risk of cardiovascular disease in Swedish women. There was also no effect modification by alcohol intake, BMI or age. Our finding of an interaction with smoking status requires reproduction.
Notes
Comment In: J Intern Med. 2015 Nov;278(5):542-426250841
PubMed ID
25991078 View in PubMed
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[Psychiatric problems in mentally disabled persons].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195924
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3236
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2000
Author
G. Skeie
Author Affiliation
Habiliteringstjenestene for voksne funksjonshemmede i Hedmark 2312 Ottestad.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Nov 10;120(27):3236
Date
Nov-10-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Humans
Mentally Disabled Persons - psychology - rehabilitation
Norway
Social Support
Social Work, Psychiatric
PubMed ID
11187159 View in PubMed
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Thyroid homeostasis in mother-child pairs in relation to maternal iodine status: the MISA study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291622
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 08; 71(8):1002-1007
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
08-2017
Author
V Berg
T H Nøst
G Skeie
Y Thomassen
B Berlinger
A S Veyhe
R Jorde
J Ø Odland
S Hansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Diagnostic Clinic, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 08; 71(8):1002-1007
Date
08-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Asymptomatic Diseases - epidemiology
Biomarkers - blood - urine
Cohort Studies
Deficiency Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology - urine
Developed Countries
Female
Humans
Hypothyroidism - epidemiology - etiology
Infant, Newborn
Iodine - deficiency - urine
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Norway
Nutritional Status
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology - urine
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Prevalence
Thyroid Gland - physiopathology - secretion
Thyroid Hormones - blood - secretion
Abstract
Iodine deficiency during pregnancy may influence maternal and foetal thyroid function with the risk of causing neurocognitive and psychomotor deficits in the offspring. The objective of this study was to assess iodine status in pregnant women from Northern Norway and to investigate the influence of iodine status on maternal and infant thyroid function.
Women from the Northern Norway Mother-and-Child contaminant Cohort Study (MISA) donated a blood and urine sample at three visits during their pregnancy and postpartum period (in second trimester, 3 days and 6 weeks after delivery. N=197). Women were assigned to iodine status groups according to urine iodine concentrations (UICs) in second trimester and mixed effects linear models were used to investigate potential associations between iodine status and repeated measurements of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), thyroid hormones (THs), TH-binding proteins and thyroid peroxidase antibodies. Associations between maternal iodine status and TSH in heel prick samples from the infants were investigated with linear regression.
Median UIC in second trimester was 84?µg/l (range 18-522) and 80% had UIC below recommended level (
Notes
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PubMed ID
28537582 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.