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41 records – page 1 of 5.

Abdominal injury from sporting activities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40437
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1982 Jun;16(2):76-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1982
Author
D. Bergqvist
H. Hedelin
G. Karlsson
B. Lindblad
T. Mätzsch
Source
Br J Sports Med. 1982 Jun;16(2):76-9
Date
Jun-1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Athletic Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Seasons
Sweden
Abstract
The frequency of abdominal injury is rising. In an analysis of 1,354 cases of closed abdominal trauma sustained during a 30-year period (1950-1979) in Skaraborg County, Sweden, a distinct increase was found in the numbers associated with sporting activities. The severity of the injuries caused by sports likewise showed an increase. The representation of injured organs was of the same order as in the total series of closed abdominal injuries. An analysis of the 136 cases of sports-associated injury is presented with regard to cause and type of the injuries, diagnosis and prognosis.
PubMed ID
7104559 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abdominal trauma during thirty years: analysis of a large case series.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature40679
Source
Injury. 1981 Sep;13(2):93-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1981
Author
D. Bergqvist
H. Hedelin
G. Karlsson
B. Lindblad
T. Mätzsch
Source
Injury. 1981 Sep;13(2):93-9
Date
Sep-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Accidents, Traffic
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Kidney - injuries
Liver - injuries
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Seasons
Spleen - injuries
Sweden
Abstract
Studies have been made in 1407 patients of the causes, the organs involved and the outcome of injury to the abdomen in patients needing admission to hospital in an area of Southern Sweden, between 1950 and the end of 1979. The proportion of female patients and those aged over 60 increased significantly. The seasonal distribution of the injuries showed significant change, with a drop in the initially high frequency sustained during the summer months. Penetrating injuries were rare, but increased in the 1970s. Road traffic accidents as the cause of abdominal injuries rose to a maximum of 56 per cent in the late 1960s. The numbers of injured organs and the frequency of other associated injuries rose gradually until the mid-1970s, after which there was a slight decrease. The spleen, liver and large blood vessels were the organs which were increasingly often injured. The annual incidence of various visceral injuries per 100 000 population was calculated. The number of patients with a delay of at least 24 hours before operation fell significantly and there was a tendency to shorter hospital stay. The mortality curve showed a peak in the late 1960s.
PubMed ID
7327735 View in PubMed
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Abdominal trauma in persons older than 60 years.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243597
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1982;148(7):569-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
D. Bergqvist
H. Hedelin
G. Karlsson
B. Lindblad
A. Lindhagen
T. Mätzsch
Source
Acta Chir Scand. 1982;148(7):569-73
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Injuries - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Aged
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Sweden
Abstract
Abdominal trauma occurring in persons older than 60 years over a 30-year period (1950-79) in a well defined region of Sweden was reviewed. The 177 patients comprised 12.5% of the total with abdominal trauma during that period. Road traffic accidents were the main cause of trauma (48% of cases). The incidence of motor-car accidents rose sharply during the first two decades of the study. Injuries to the liver and bile ducts and multiple intra-abdominal injuries were more common in the elderly than in younger patients, but injury to the abdominal wall was less common. A tendency towards more severe injuries and multiple trauma with extra-abdominal involvement emerged during the study period. The mortality rate was 27.6% in the patients older than 60, but 9.1% in the overall patient series with abdominal trauma. One-third of all the deaths among the older patients were directly due to the abdominal trauma. One consequence of the increasing numbers of old people in the general population is probably that more and more cases of abdominal trauma will be seen in the higher age groups.
PubMed ID
7168285 View in PubMed
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Apoptosis, proliferation, and sex steroid receptors in postmenopausal endometrium before and during HRT.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178021
Source
Maturitas. 2004 Oct 15;49(2):114-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2004
Author
Marju Dahmoun
Inga-Stina Odmark
Björn Risberg
Mats G Karlsson
Tatjana Pavlenko
Torbjörn Bäckström
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mid Sweden Research and Development Center, Sundsvall Hospital, SE-851 86 Sundsvall, Sweden. marju.dahmoun@lvn.se
Source
Maturitas. 2004 Oct 15;49(2):114-23
Date
Oct-15-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Apoptosis - drug effects
Biopsy
Cell Proliferation - drug effects
Endometrium - cytology - drug effects - metabolism
Estradiol - administration & dosage
Estrogen Receptor alpha - drug effects - metabolism
Estrogen Replacement Therapy - adverse effects
Estrogens, Conjugated (USP) - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Ki-67 Antigen - analysis
Medroxyprogesterone Acetate - administration & dosage
Middle Aged
Norethindrone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Postmenopause
Prospective Studies
Receptors, Progesterone - drug effects - metabolism
Regression Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Hemorrhage - chemically induced - metabolism
Abstract
Endometrial homeostasis, indicated as the balance between apoptosis and proliferation, was studied with regard to endometrial safety and bleeding disturbances.
The quantitatively sufficient endometrial biopsies of 92 postmenopausal women enrolled in the study were investigated. The participants were divided into two groups, each receiving a continuous combined HRT regimen with either conjugated estrogen (CE) 0.625 mg + 5 mg medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) (=CE/MPA) or 17-beta-estradiol (E2) 2 mg + 1 mg norethisterone acetate (NETA) (=E2/NETA). These were evaluated according to apoptotic index (Ai) and proliferation marker Ki-67 index. Estrogen receptor alpha (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) expression were also monitored, as well as endometrial thickness. Quantitative in situ techniques were used.
Ai and Ki-67 index were unchanged in epithelial glands of endometrium from baseline to second biopsy obtained after 1 year of combined continuous HRT. In stromal tissue, Ki-67 index was increased, while Ai was on the same level. PR expression in both epithelium and stroma was unchanged. Endometrial thickness was unaffected during therapy, and the histopathological evaluation showed no development of hyperplasia or carcinoma.
The unaffected homeostasis in endometrial epithelium contributes to endometrial safety and is in accordance with the histopathological findings of no hyperplasia. The homeostasis of stroma was transformed to be more proliferative. Increased stromal proliferation may be of importance for stromal support of the veins and for decreasing breakthrough bleeding during HRT. The increased stromal proliferation, as well as the decreased ER expression both in epithelium and stroma, could be an effect of progesterone.
PubMed ID
15474755 View in PubMed
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[A study of IVF treatment: misleading polemics on cost effectiveness]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64943
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jul 22;89(30-31):2496
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-22-1992
Author
B. Jönsson
B. Brorsson
P. Carlsson
G. Karlsson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Jul 22;89(30-31):2496
Date
Jul-22-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Fertilization in Vitro
Humans
Pregnancy
Sweden
PubMed ID
1507973 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attendance at cultural events and physical exercise and health: a randomized controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49912
Source
Public Health. 2000 Sep;114(5):316-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
B B Konlaan
N. Björby
L O Bygren
G. Weissglas
L G Karlsson
M. Widmark
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Public Health. 2000 Sep;114(5):316-9
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Art
Biological Markers - blood
Blood pressure
Corticotropin - blood
Drama
Exercise
Female
Health status
Humans
Infection - blood
Leisure Activities
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Motion Pictures
Music
Prolactin - blood
Questionnaires
Stress, Psychological - blood
Sweden
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the specific biomedico-social effects of participating in cultural events and gentle physical exercise effects apart from the general effect of participating in group activities. This was a randomized controlled investigation using a factorial design, where attending cultural events and taking easy physical exercise were tested simultaneously. The 21 participants, aged between 18 and 74 y were from a simple random sample of people registered as residents in Umeå, a town in northern Sweden. Among the 1000 in the sample, 21 individuals (11 men, 10 women) were recruited into the experiment. Two out of the 21 subjects dropped out and were discounted from our analysis. Nine people were encouraged to engage in cultural activity for a two-month period. Diastolic blood pressure in eight of these nine was significantly reduced following the experiment. There were no marked changes observed in either systolic or diastolic blood pressure in those not required to engage in any form of extra-cultural activity. A decrease in the levels of both adrenocorticotropical hormone (ACTH) and s-prolactin was observed in culturally stimulated subjects, whereas the average baseline s-prolactin level of 7 ng/l for the non-culturally stimulated group was unchanged after the experiment. Physical exercise produced an increase in the high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level and in the ratio of HDL to LDL (low density lipoprotein). It was concluded that cultural stimulation may have specific effects on health related determinants.
PubMed ID
11035447 View in PubMed
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Cancer treatment in Sweden--costs of drugs, inpatient and outpatient care from 1985 to 1996 and cost effectiveness of new drugs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21357
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(5):447-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
G. Ragnarson Tennvall
G. Karlsson
Author Affiliation
IHE, The Swedish Institute for Health Economics, Lund. grt@ihe.se
Source
Acta Oncol. 1998;37(5):447-53
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care - economics
Androgen Antagonists - economics - therapeutic use
Antineoplastic Agents - economics - therapeutic use
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Deoxycytidine - analogs & derivatives - economics - therapeutic use
Drug Costs
Filgrastim - economics - therapeutic use
Gonadorelin - economics - therapeutic use
Humans
Neoplasms - drug therapy - economics
Paclitaxel - economics - therapeutic use
Receptors, Serotonin - drug effects
Receptors, Serotonin, 5-HT3
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
This study was carried out to investigate the direct costs for treatment of patients with cancer from 1985 to 1996 in Sweden, and to examine health economic effects of changes in treatment pattern. Material for the study was collected from official statistics and from published health economic evaluations of cancer treatment. Costs for inpatient care decreased during the period, while costs for outpatient care and drugs increased. In total, the direct health care costs for cancer treatment decreased from 1985 to 1996. New drugs registered on the market are often more expensive than the drugs they replace. From a health economic perspective it is not clear, however, that higher drug costs necessarily increase total costs. Further health economic research is needed because many treatment alternatives have not yet been evaluated, and furthermore, because a treatment option can be cost effective in one specific indication but not in another.
PubMed ID
9831373 View in PubMed
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[Care of patients with dementia--a ticking cost bomb?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216474
Source
Nord Med. 1995;110(4):123-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
A. Wimo
G. Karlsson
P O Sandman
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för Allmänmedicin, Umeå Universitet och Primärvårdens utvecklingsenhet i Nordanstig, Bergsjö.
Source
Nord Med. 1995;110(4):123-6
Date
1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Health Care Costs
Humans
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Owing to the increasing number of elderly people, the prevalence of dementia will also increase. In 1990, there were about 101,000 people with moderate to severe dementia in Sweden, or 6.4 percent of the population over 65 years of age (65+ pop.). The figure will increase to about 121,000 by the year 2000 (7.7 percent of the 65+ pop.), and to 156,000 by 2025 (7.5 percent of the 65+ pop.). The corresponding health care costs, which were SEK 30 billion in 1991, are estimated to reach SEK 35 billion by 2000, and SEK 46 billion by 2025. Assuming comparable increases in the prevalence of dementia in the other Nordic countries, the overall number of dementia patients will increase from 247,000 in 1991 to 371,000 by 2025, and the respective costs from SEK 74 billion to SEK 110 billion.
PubMed ID
7724356 View in PubMed
Less detail

41 records – page 1 of 5.