Skip header and navigation

Refine By

57 records – page 1 of 6.

Allergenic crossreactivity between Lepidoglyphus destructor and Blomia tropicalis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15793
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Jun;27(6):691-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
E. Johansson
M. Schmidt
S G Johansson
L. Machado
S. Olsson
M. van Hage-Hamsten
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1997 Jun;27(6):691-9
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - analysis - immunology
Animals
Asthma - immunology
Conjunctivitis - immunology
Cross Reactions
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - metabolism
Insect Proteins - immunology
Mites - immunology
Molecular Weight
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - immunology
Species Specificity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In general, the non-pyroglyphid mites Lepidoglyphus destructor and Blomia tropicalis show a different geographical distribution. Allergic sensitization to both species have been demonstrated in several investigations. However, whether this reflects cross-reactivity or dual sensitization is so far not known. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the allergenicity and allergenic crossreactivity of L. destructor and B. tropicalis using sera from Sweden and Brazil. METHODS: Allergens in extracts of L. destructor and B. tropicalis were identified with SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting and the crossreactivity was studied by an immunoblot inhibition method. In addition to mite extracts, a recombinant major allergen of L. destructor, Lep d 2, was used. RESULTS: The extract prepared from L. destructor contained 21 IgE-binding components when using the Swedish or the Brazilian sera. A 15 kDa allergen was recognized by 85% of the Swedish sera and 78% of the Brazilian. The B. tropicalis extract exposed 23 IgE-binding components when the Brazilian sera were used and 19 when the Swedish sera were used. A total of 83% of the Brazilian sera and 80% of the Swedish sera identified a 14.5 kDa allergen. The IgE response of the Swedish serum pool to 10 B. tropicalis allergens was inhibited by L. destructor extract. Likewise, the response of the Brazilian serum pool to four different L. destructor allergens was inhibited by B. tropicalis extract. The recombinant Lep d 2 allergen inhibited 33% of the IgE binding of the Swedish serum pool to the 14.5 kDa allergen in the B. tropicalis extract. CONCLUSION: Crossreactivity with several proteins from L. destructor and B. tropicalis was demonstrated. The results suggest that a B. tropicalis 14.5 kDa allergen is antigenically crossreactive with recombinant L. destructor allergen Lep d 2.
PubMed ID
9208191 View in PubMed
Less detail

Allergic symptoms up to 4-6 years of age in children given cow milk neonatally. A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36696
Source
Allergy. 1992 Jun;47(3):207-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
A T Lindfors
L. Danielsson
E. Enocksson
S G Johansson
S. Westin
Author Affiliation
Dept of Pediatrics, Danderyd Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1992 Jun;47(3):207-11
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child
Child, Preschool
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - immunology
Immunoglobulin E - analysis
Incidence
Infant
Infant Food
Infant, Newborn
Milk - immunology
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Random Allocation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In a previously published prospective study, we followed the development of allergic symptoms in term infants with a slightly reduced birthweight (-1 SD to -2 SD). These children received, according to local routine, early feeding with cow milk formula in order to diminish such neonatal problems as hypoglycemia and hyperbilirubinemia. Of 216 infants 207 were observed for allergic symptoms up to 18 months of age. One group (F) received cow milk formula during the first days of life before the mother's breastmilk production started and was then breastfed; the other (B) was not given any formula before normal breastfeeding started. Unexpectedly, we found fewer allergic symptoms, in particular allergic skin problems, in the group fed cow milk, the difference being concentrated to children with a family history of allergic symptoms. At 5 years of age 183 of the 207 children have been reinvestigated. Mild symptoms of allergy (suspected and obvious) were found in 22% (F) and 27% (B) respectively (NS). Moderate and severe symptoms of allergy (obvious) were found in 4.2% (F) and 4.5% (B). In the subgroup with a double family history of allergic symptoms, 28% (7/25, F) and 59% (10/17, B) had symptoms of allergy (p less than 0.05). This difference was even more pronounced when laboratory tests in favour of atopic diagnosis were included, 14% (F) and 53% (B) respectively (p less than 0.05). Thus at 5 years we still find a significantly lower frequency of allergic symptoms in the subgroup fed cow milk formula early with a family history of allergic symptoms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1510232 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alzheimer's disease, oral function and nutritional status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52743
Source
Gerodontology. 1996 Jul;13(1):9-16
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1996
Author
G. Nordenram
E. Ryd-Kjellen
G. Johansson
G. Nordstrom
B. Winblad
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Diagnostic Sciences, School of Dentistry, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
Source
Gerodontology. 1996 Jul;13(1):9-16
Date
Jul-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - physiopathology
Anthropometry
Comparative Study
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Institutionalization
Male
Mastication
Nutritional Status
Oral Health
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To study differences in nutritional, dental status and oral function between institutionalised patients with Alzheimer's disease and cognitively healthy elderly people living in the community. DESIGN: Comparison was made between two groups. Alzheimer's disease sufferers and healthy controls, using established criteria for anthropometric, mental and dental state. SETTING: An institution and residential area in Stockholm, Sweden. SUBJECTS: Forty patients with Alzheimer's disease living in a nursing home and 40 age- and gender-matched control subjects living independently. INTERVENTION: Dental status and anthropometric variables. RESULTS: Overnutrition was less frequent among the demented than the controls and more demented were undernourished. Dental status was similar in the two groups with few edentulous subjects but only 2 of 7 edentulous subjects with Alzheimer's disease wore dentures. Having natural teeth and many functional oral zones is important for food consistency choice, but not for nutritional status. In the Alzheimer group, the stage of dementia has a strong association to the ability to eat unaided and an association with dental status. CONCLUSION: There are differences in nutritional status between Alzheimer's patients in institutions and cognitively healthy elderly living at home. The choice of food consistency is correlated to dental status but nutritional status is not shown to be influenced by dental status. However, the ability to eat unaided is strongly correlated to cognitive status.
PubMed ID
9452637 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anaphylactic reaction caused by neoallergens in heated pecan nut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213707
Source
Allergy. 1995 Dec;50(12):988-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1995
Author
K. Malanin
M. Lundberg
S G Johansson
Author Affiliation
Medical Center of Lappeenranta, Finland.
Source
Allergy. 1995 Dec;50(12):988-91
Date
Dec-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergens - adverse effects
Anaphylaxis - etiology - immunology
Child
Electrophoresis, Polyacrylamide Gel
Female
Finland
Humans
Nuts - immunology
Radioallergosorbent Test
Skin Tests
Abstract
An atopic girl experienced an anaphylactic reaction after eating cookies containing pecan nuts. Investigations revealed that she had developed IgE antibodies exclusively specific against allergenic determinants present in aged or heated pecan nuts, but not in fresh pecans. These neoallergenic determinants were located on protein(s) with a molecular weight of approximately 15 kDa. Neoallergens appearing during heating or storing of foods may be important in some anaphylactic reactions.
PubMed ID
8834830 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arbuscular mycorrhizas are present on Spitsbergen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283913
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2017 Jul 10;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-10-2017
Author
K K Newsham
P B Eidesen
M L Davey
J. Axelsen
E. Courtecuisse
C. Flintrop
A G Johansson
M. Kiepert
S E Larsen
K E Lorberau
M. Maurset
J. McQuilkin
M. Misiak
A. Pop
S. Thompson
D J Read
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2017 Jul 10;
Date
Jul-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
A previous study of 76 plant species on Spitsbergen in the High Arctic concluded that structures resembling arbuscular mycorrhizas were absent from roots. Here, we report a survey examining the roots of 13 grass and forb species collected from 12 sites on the island for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonisation. Of the 102 individuals collected, we recorded AM endophytes in the roots of 41 plants of 11 species (Alopecurus ovatus, Deschampsia alpina, Festuca rubra ssp. richardsonii, putative viviparous hybrids of Poa arctica and Poa pratensis, Poa arctica ssp. arctica, Trisetum spicatum, Coptidium spitsbergense, Ranunculus nivalis, Ranunculus pygmaeus, Ranunculus sulphureus and Taraxacum arcticum) sampled from 10 sites. Both coarse AM endophyte, with hyphae of 5-10 µm width, vesicles and occasional arbuscules, and fine endophyte, consisting of hyphae of 1-3 µm width and sparse arbuscules, were recorded in roots. Coarse AM hyphae, vesicles, arbuscules and fine endophyte hyphae occupied 1.0-30.7, 0.8-18.3, 0.7-11.9 and 0.7-12.8% of the root lengths of colonised plants, respectively. Principal component analysis indicated no associations between the abundances of AM structures in roots and edaphic factors. We conclude that the AM symbiosis is present in grass and forb roots on Spitsbergen.
PubMed ID
28695334 View in PubMed
Less detail

Arbuscular mycorrhizas are present on Spitsbergen.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294584
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2017 Oct; 27(7):725-731
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
K K Newsham
P B Eidesen
M L Davey
J Axelsen
E Courtecuisse
C Flintrop
A G Johansson
M Kiepert
S E Larsen
K E Lorberau
M Maurset
J McQuilkin
M Misiak
A Pop
S Thompson
D J Read
Author Affiliation
Department of Arctic Biology, The University Centre in Svalbard, P.O. Box 156, N-9171, Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway. kne@bas.ac.uk.
Source
Mycorrhiza. 2017 Oct; 27(7):725-731
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Endophytes - physiology
Geography
Magnoliopsida - microbiology - physiology
Mycorrhizae - physiology
Svalbard
Symbiosis
Abstract
A previous study of 76 plant species on Spitsbergen in the High Arctic concluded that structures resembling arbuscular mycorrhizas were absent from roots. Here, we report a survey examining the roots of 13 grass and forb species collected from 12 sites on the island for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonisation. Of the 102 individuals collected, we recorded AM endophytes in the roots of 41 plants of 11 species (Alopecurus ovatus, Deschampsia alpina, Festuca rubra ssp. richardsonii, putative viviparous hybrids of Poa arctica and Poa pratensis, Poa arctica ssp. arctica, Trisetum spicatum, Coptidium spitsbergense, Ranunculus nivalis, Ranunculus pygmaeus, Ranunculus sulphureus and Taraxacum arcticum) sampled from 10 sites. Both coarse AM endophyte, with hyphae of 5-10 µm width, vesicles and occasional arbuscules, and fine endophyte, consisting of hyphae of 1-3 µm width and sparse arbuscules, were recorded in roots. Coarse AM hyphae, vesicles, arbuscules and fine endophyte hyphae occupied 1.0-30.7, 0.8-18.3, 0.7-11.9 and 0.7-12.8% of the root lengths of colonised plants, respectively. Principal component analysis indicated no associations between the abundances of AM structures in roots and edaphic factors. We conclude that the AM symbiosis is present in grass and forb roots on Spitsbergen.
Notes
Cites: Mycorrhiza. 2013 Jul;23(5):411-30 PMID 23422950
Cites: Mycologia. 2016 Sep;108(5):1028-1046 PMID 27738200
Cites: New Phytol. 2017 Jan;213(2):481-486 PMID 27768808
Cites: Mycorrhiza. 2006 Jul;16(5):299-363 PMID 16845554
Cites: Oecologia. 1993 May;94(2):229-234 PMID 28314036
Cites: Mycorrhiza. 2017 Apr;27(3):189-200 PMID 27838854
Cites: J Exp Bot. 2009;60(9):2465-80 PMID 19429838
PubMed ID
28695334 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aspects of teeth from archaelogic sites in Sweden and Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33952
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):14-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1998
Author
V. Alexandersen
J G Norén
I. Hoyer
W. Dietz
G. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Laboratory of Biological Anthropology, Panum Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Feb;56(1):14-9
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acids - adverse effects
Burial
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark
Dental Enamel - anatomy & histology - embryology - ultrastructure
Dentin - anatomy & histology - ultrastructure
Environment
Food Habits
Gestational Age
History, Ancient
Humans
Microscopy, Electron, Scanning
Microscopy, Polarization
Molar - anatomy & histology - ultrastructure
Paleodontology
Porosity
Postmortem Changes
Sweden
Tooth Abrasion - pathology
Tooth, Deciduous - anatomy & histology - embryology - ultrastructure
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine ground sections of primary second molars and permanent first molars from the same jaws. Teeth from 11 individuals were collected from archaeologic sites in Sweden and Denmark. Longitudinal buccolingual sections were examined in a polarization light microscope and in a Philips scanning electron microscope (SEM). The seven teeth from Sweden appeared to have been subjected to environmental influences at their burial site, which had affected both the dentin and the enamel. The teeth from the Danish sites had a normal color, and no disintegration of the dentin was seen. The general morphologic appearance was normal in all primary and permanent teeth. The position of the neonatal line indicated a normal full-term gestational age. The observed accentuated incremental lines in both the primary and permanent enamel suggested periods of dietary changes, possibly related to periods of illness. SEM images of the surface area of the Swedish teeth showed an extremely porous enamel surface with severe changes in the prism structure as an effect of acid penetration. The Danish teeth did not show any marked changes in the enamel.
PubMed ID
9537729 View in PubMed
Less detail

Associations of HbA1c and educational level with risk of cardiovascular events in 32,871 drug-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes: a cohort study in primary care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116881
Source
Diabet Med. 2013 May;30(5):e170-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
C J Östgren
J. Sundström
B. Svennblad
L. Lohm
P M Nilsson
G. Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Diabet Med. 2013 May;30(5):e170-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Diabetic Angiopathies - blood - drug therapy - epidemiology
Drug Therapy, Combination
Educational Status
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Hypoglycemic agents - therapeutic use
Male
Metformin - therapeutic use
Odds Ratio
Primary Health Care
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To explore the association of HbA1c and educational level with risk of cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with Type 2 diabetes.
A cohort of 32 871 patients with Type 2 diabetes aged 35 years and older identified by extracting data from electronic patient records for all patients who had a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes and had glucose-lowering agents prescribed between 1999 and 2009 at 84 primary care centres in Sweden. Associations of mean HbA1c levels and educational level with risks of cardiovascular events and all-cause mortality were analysed.
The associations of HbA1c with risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality were J-shaped, with the lowest risk observed for cardiovascular mortality at an HbA1c level of 51 mmol/mol (6.8%) for subjects on oral agents and 56 mmol/mol (7.3%) in insulin-treated patients. The lowest risk observed for all-cause mortality was at an HbA1c level of 51 mmol/mol (6.8%) for subjects on oral agents and 56 mmol/mol (7.3%) in insulin-treated patients. There was an increased risk for cardiovascular death [hazard ratio 1.6 (1.2-2.1), P = 0.0008] at the lowest HbA1c decile for subjects in the low education category. For subjects with higher education there was no evident J curve for cardiovascular death [hazard ratio 1.2 (0.8-1.6), P = 0.3873].
Our results lend support to the recent American Diabetes Association/ European Association for the Study of Diabetes position statement that emphasizes the importance of additional factors, including the propensity for hypoglycaemia, which should influence HbA1c targets and treatment choices for individual patients. (Clinical Trials Registry No; NCT 01121315).
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2009 May 23;373(9677):1765-7219465231
Cites: Diabetologia. 2009 Nov;52(11):2288-9819655124
Cites: Lancet. 2010 Feb 6;375(9713):481-920110121
Cites: J Intern Med. 2010 Nov;268(5):471-8220804517
Cites: BMJ. 1996 Oct 19;313(7063):975-88892417
Cites: Am Heart J. 2004 Oct;148(4):566-7315459584
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2004 Aug;33(4):864-7115131089
Cites: Clin Chem. 2004 Jan;50(1):166-7414709644
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2001 Jul 9;161(13):1653-911434798
Cites: Diabetologia. 2012 Jun;55(6):1577-9622526604
Cites: Ups J Med Sci. 2012 Mar;117(1):52-622335391
Cites: BMJ. 2011;343:d416921791495
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2011 Mar 3;364(9):829-4121366474
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2011 Jun;34(6):1329-3621505211
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2009 May 5;150(9):604-1219414839
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Jan 8;360(2):129-3919092145
Cites: BMC Public Health. 2011;11:45021658213
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Jun 12;358(24):2545-5918539917
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Jun 12;358(24):2560-7218539916
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2007 Oct;30(10):2478-8317623824
Cites: Eur J Gen Pract. 2006;12(2):58-6516945878
Cites: Int J Clin Pract. 2005 Nov;59(11):1309-1616236086
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Sep 12;352(9131):837-539742976
Cites: Diabet Med. 1998 Mar;15(3):205-129545121
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Oct 9;359(15):1577-8918784090
PubMed ID
23350893 View in PubMed
Less detail

Candidaemia in Sweden: a nationwide prospective observational survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117128
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2013 Apr;19(4):E218-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
J. Ericsson
E. Chryssanthou
L. Klingspor
A G Johansson
P. Ljungman
E. Svensson
J. Sjölin
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Diseases, Västmanland Hospital, Västerås, Sweden. jesper.ericsson@ltv.se
Source
Clin Microbiol Infect. 2013 Apr;19(4):E218-21
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antifungal Agents - pharmacology
Candida - classification - isolation & purification
Candidemia - epidemiology - microbiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Drug Resistance, Fungal
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
A prospective observational nationwide investigation was performed from September 2005 to August 2006 to study the epidemiology of candidaemia in Sweden. From 385 patients, 403 isolates were recovered, yielding an incidence of 4.2 cases per 100 000 inhabitants. Candida albicans was the most common species (61%), followed by Candida glabrata (20%) and Candida parapsilosis (9%). The rates of resistance to fluconazole were = 1% in C. albicans and 6-29% in non-albicans species other than C. glabrata and Candida krusei. Resistance to voriconazole was rare, except for C. glabrata and C. krusei. Only three isolates had reduced susceptibility to amphotericin B, and one had reduced susceptibility to caspofungin.
PubMed ID
23331511 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Care in heart failure may be improved!]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54448
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Nov 26;94(48):4445
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-26-1997
Author
G. Johansson
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Nov 26;94(48):4445
Date
Nov-26-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care Facilities - standards
Cardiology Service, Hospital - standards
Heart Failure, Congestive - drug therapy - nursing - therapy
Humans
Patient Care Planning
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 1997 Jun 18;94(25):2369-729229656
PubMed ID
9424538 View in PubMed
Less detail

57 records – page 1 of 6.