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17 records – page 1 of 2.

An economic appraisal of two strategies in geriatric screening.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature73117
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1994 Dec;22(4):293-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
G. Johansen
Author Affiliation
Nordic School of Public Health, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Soc Med. 1994 Dec;22(4):293-8
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Female
Geriatric Assessment
Health Services Needs and Demand - economics
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - economics
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Primary Health Care - economics
Questionnaires - economics
Sweden
Abstract
Screening for preventive geriatric health-care has become common in many Norwegian municipalities. Different methods are used to screen for unreported need of intervention. There is little information available about which is the most costeffective method. This article describes a comparison of two screening models. The first screening was conducted by means of a personal interview held at a health clinic and the second by a postal questionnaire. The results show that a postal questionnaire study was more cost-effective than the health-clinic consultation. It demanded no more resources than the health-clinic model, but had a wider effect because it covered a broader spectrum with regard to response, proportion of the total population and the proportion of respondents for whom an intervention was implemented.
PubMed ID
7716440 View in PubMed
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Chronobiology of coronary risk markers in Greenland Eskimos: a comparative study with Caucasians residing in the same Arctic area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4916
Source
Chronobiol Int. 1991;8(5):352-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
L G Johansen
J. Gram
C. Kluft
J. Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Ribe County Hospital, Esbjerg, Denmark.
Source
Chronobiol Int. 1991;8(5):352-60
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers
Circadian Rhythm
Comparative Study
Coronary Disease - epidemiology
Diet
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Fibrinolysis
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Abstract
We report a comparison of fibrinolytic variables between 10 Caucasians on a predominantly European diet and 10 Greenland Eskimos on a traditional Inuit diet containing a substantial amount of fish and sea animals. We studied the diurnal variation in tissue type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI) antigens and activities during a 24-h period. Blood samples were taken every 4 h. The variations of the sinusoidal curves were evaluated by the Friedman chi 2 test. t-PA and PAI-1 antigen in plasma fluctuated significantly during the 24 h (Eskimos p less than 0.00007 and p less than 0.0007; Caucasians p less than 0.00003 and p less than 0.02), with a peak in the early morning and a nadir in the afternoon. This also held true for PAI activity (Eskimos p less than 0.0008; Caucasians p less than 0.01), whereas t-PA activity showed an inverse but still significant pattern (Eskimos p less than 0.006; Caucasians p less than 0.0008). Amplitudes, areas underneath, and overall medians of the sinusoidal curves did not deviate between the two groups with respect to t-PA and PAI. In contrast to the significant variation of t-PA and PAI, the plasma concentrations of fibrin degradation products (D-Dimer), a measure of effective fibrinolysis, remained constant during the 24 h, and the absolute differences between groups did not reach statistical significance. These findings suggest that circadian variation of fibrinolytic activators and inhibitors is a basic biologic phenomenon, which is not affected by life-style, dietary habits, or ethnic differences.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1818785 View in PubMed
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Dental amalgam--the possible contribution to mercury burden in Greenland Inuit.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6193
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1991 Apr;50(2):73-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
A V Tulinius
L G Johansen
Author Affiliation
Nanortalik District Dental Clinic, Greenland.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1991 Apr;50(2):73-5
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body Burden
Dental Amalgam
Female
Food Contamination
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Male
Mercury - blood
Middle Aged
Abstract
The possible contribution to the total mercury burden by dental amalgam among Greenland Eskimos has been studied in Nanortalik Health District. A total of 40 individuals have been tested, and no significant differences in whole blood mercury have been found between individuals with and without experience of dental amalgam. Higher values than previously reported for South-West Greenland have been found, mercury (Hg) concentrations reaching a median of 53 microgram Hg/l in males and 42.5 microgram Hg/l in females. A tendency towards covariation with the relative amount of local food items in the diet did not reach significance at a 5% level.
PubMed ID
2049152 View in PubMed
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DNA-polymorphisms and plasma levels of vascular disease risk factors in Greenland Inuit--is there a relation with the low risk of cardiovascular disease in the Inuit?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5559
Source
Thromb Haemost. 1999 Apr;81(4):547-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
M P de Maat
E M Bladbjerg
L G Johansen
P. de Knijff
J. Gram
C. Kluft
J. Jespersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Thrombosis Research, University of Southern Denmark, Ribe County Hospital, Esbjerg. M.deMaat@pg.tno.nl
Source
Thromb Haemost. 1999 Apr;81(4):547-52
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alleles
Angiotensinogen - genetics
Antifibrinolytic Agents - pharmacology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
DNA - blood - genetics
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products - genetics
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits - genetics
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk factors
Vascular Diseases - blood - ethnology - genetics
Abstract
Greenland Inuit are a population with a low risk of cardiovascular disease. Recently, we stated that frequencies of potentially high risk alleles of the apolipoproteins, fibrinogen, factor V, glycoprotein IIIa and factor VII (FVII) genes have different allele frequencies in the Inuit when compared with Caucasian populations. We have extended this study and evaluated whether or not this was also true for the genetic polymorphisms of tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensinogen in a group of 133 Greenland Inuit, aged 30-34 gamma. In addition, we compared the plasma levels of these factors and those of C-reactive protein (CRP) and D-Dimer in Inuit and in Danes, comparable for age and gender. Frequencies (f) were assessed of the alleles that are known as the potential high risk alleles in Caucasians. In the Inuit, the f(insertion allele) of the t-PA intron8ins311 polymorphism was 0.37 (CI 0.32-0.43), the f(4G allele) of the PAI-1 promoter polymorphism was 0.88 (CI 0.83-0.91), the f(deletion allele) of the ACE intron16ins287 polymorphism was 0.40 (CI 0.33-0.47) and the f(M-allele) of the angiotensinogen M/T353 polymorphism was 0.30(CI 0.25-0.38). As for fibrinogen and FVII polymorphisms, these frequencies are all significantly different from what is reported for Caucasian populations. In the Inuit, plasma levels of fibrinogen and D-Dimer were higher than in the Danes, the PAI-1 levels were lower and FVII, t-PA and CRP levels were comparable. The observed allele frequencies of the polymorphisms of t-PA, fibrinogen, FVII, ACE, angiotensinogen and the plasma levels of PAI-1 and D-Dimer were in accordance with the low CVD risk in the Inuit, considering the observed associations between these measures and CVD risk in Caucasian populations, but for other measures this was not the case (allele frequencies of the PAI-1 polymorphism, and plasma levels of fibrinogen, FVII and t-PA). In conclusion there are clear differences in genetic background and plasma levels of risk factors in Greenland Inuit compared with Caucasian populations, and these differences were sometimes, but not always, in accordance with the observed low cardiovascular disease risk of the Inuit population.
PubMed ID
10235437 View in PubMed
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Establishing Arctic Medical Research as an international journal of Arctic medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235775
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1987;46(1):44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
L G Johansen
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1987;46(1):44
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Cold Climate
Humans
Publishing
Research
PubMed ID
3675784 View in PubMed
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Health-care screening among the elderly--a comparison between participants and non-participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8026
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):169-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
G. Johansen
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 1994;8(3):169-72
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Comparative Study
Geriatric Assessment
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Mass Screening - utilization
Patient compliance
Abstract
Geriatric screening at health clinics has become a regular feature of the health-care services offered in some Norwegian municipalities. Normally there is good participation in such screening programmes, but there are always some non-attenders. There is little published material showing the intervention needs among non-respondents. In a municipality in the middle parts of Norway, screening was offered to the municipality's elderly inhabitants at the local health clinic. Those who did not attend were offered a domiciliary visit. The findings indicate that there is a category of people among those who do not attend for screening at the health clinic who have less need of a medical examination and socioeconomic support than those who do attend the screening. There is also a category in need of community nursing, technical aids and health care because of senile dementia, depression and unsought social isolation.
PubMed ID
7724925 View in PubMed
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[Health personnel must cooperate in disaster preparedness. Interview by Siri Wahl-Olsen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240491
Source
Sykepleien. 1984 May 21;71(9):24-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-21-1984
Author
G. Johansen
Source
Sykepleien. 1984 May 21;71(9):24-5
Date
May-21-1984
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Health Nursing - education
Disaster planning
Education, Nursing, Continuing
Humans
Norway
PubMed ID
6564791 View in PubMed
Less detail

Lipoprotein profile of a Greenland Inuit population. Influence of anthropometric variables, Apo E and A4 polymorphism, and lifestyle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11806
Source
Arterioscler Thromb. 1992 Dec;12(12):1371-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1992
Author
P. de Knijff
L G Johansen
M. Rosseneu
R R Frants
J. Jespersen
L M Havekes
Author Affiliation
Gaubius Laboratory IVVO-TNO, Leiden, The Netherlands.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb. 1992 Dec;12(12):1371-9
Date
Dec-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Alleles
Anthropometry
Apolipoproteins A - genetics
Apolipoproteins E - genetics
Cholesterol Esters - blood
Fatty Acids - blood
Female
Greenland
Humans
Inuits
Life Style
Lipoproteins - blood
Male
Polymorphism, Genetic
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Abstract
Previously it has been reported that Greenland Inuit (Eskimos) from the Uummannaq district display low levels of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides and relatively high levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) when compared with healthy Danish control subjects (Lancet 1971;1:1143-1146). Here we present data obtained in 1989 that show the following. In a group of 133 healthy adult Greenland Inuit from Nanortalik, the levels of plasma cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (6.39 and 4.39 mmol/l, respectively) were slightly higher than "normal" values found in western societies, whereas the HDL cholesterol level was markedly higher (1.64 mmol/l). Compared with most Caucasian populations, the Inuit population we studied exhibits a high apolipoprotein (APO)E*4 allele frequency (0.229), whereas the APOE*2 allele frequency was extremely low (0.015). In contrast to Caucasian populations, in the Inuit population the apoE polymorphism showed only a minor influence on the plasma lipid and (apo)lipoprotein levels, as evaluated by multiple regression analysis, with the exception of apoE levels. This absence of an effect could be explained by the low very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) plus intermediate density lipoprotein (IDL) cholesterol levels. The contributions of eicosapentaenoic acid and linoleic acid to the total amount of fatty acids in plasma cholesterol esters differed markedly from those reported in 1971 for another Greenland Inuit population (3.2% versus 15.8% and 49.5% versus 20.4%, respectively), thereby resembling values now found in the average western population. Even in those Inuit who reported exclusive consumption of the traditional Inuit diet (13% of the population), the fatty acid composition of the plasma cholesterol esters closely resembled the values measured in western populations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1450169 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.