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Androgen levels in pregnant women decrease with increasing maternal age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52146
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
S M Carlsen
G. Jacobsen
K S Bjerve
Author Affiliation
Section of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, St. Olav's Hospital. University Hospital of Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2003;63(1):23-6
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aging - physiology
Androgens - blood
Androstenedione - blood
Dehydroepiandrosterone Sulfate - blood
Female
Humans
Maternal Age
Pregnancy - blood
Pregnancy Trimester, Second
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Testosterone - blood
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To investigate a possible effect of age on maternal androgen levels in uncomplicated pregnancies. METHODS: A study of 134 parous women with uncomplicated pregnancies was carried out at three university hospitals in Norway and Sweden. Maternal levels of androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, testosterone and the free testosterone index were measured during weeks 17 and 33 of pregnancy. RESULTS: Maternal levels of androstenedione and testosterone had a negative association with maternal age in weeks 17 and 33 of pregnancy, while dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate and the free testosterone index were associated negatively in week 33 only. Adjustment for maternal parity, pre-pregnancy body mass index, smoking and fetal gender did not affect the results. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal androgen levels decrease with increasing maternal age. The cause and possible implication of this finding remain unknown.
PubMed ID
12729066 View in PubMed
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Antenatal care in general practice, Trondheim, Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65333
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1989 Mar;7(1):27-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1989
Author
G. Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 1989 Mar;7(1):27-31
Date
Mar-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Clinical Trials
Family Practice
Female
Hospitalization
Humans
Norway
Parity
Physician's Role
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - therapy
Prenatal Care
Random Allocation
Referral and Consultation
Risk factors
Role
Abstract
In this study from the city of Trondheim during 1979-81 nulliparae were found to be younger, higher educated, and more actively working outside the home than parous women. Most women were examined by their GP during the first trimester, and were seen about 10 times on average during the pregnancy. Women who smoked tended to consult later in pregnancy than the non-smokers. Drugs were prescribed for 33% of the women during their pregnancy, 10% during the first trimester. Medication was most frequently prescribed for genitourinary disorders. Sick leave was often the result of low-back-pain and lasted on average 5 weeks longer in parous women. Hospitalization was most often due to hypertension and threatened premature labour and lasted on average longer among nulliparae. Controlled trials are needed to evaluate future antenatal care provision in the light of pregnancy outcome.
PubMed ID
2657954 View in PubMed
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Behavior in term, small for gestational age preschoolers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature31927
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2001 Dec;65(2):107-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
K. Sommerfelt
H W Andersson
K. Sonnander
G. Ahlsten
B. Ellertsen
T. Markestad
G. Jacobsen
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Bergen, Barneklinikken, 5021 Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Early Hum Dev. 2001 Dec;65(2):107-21
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Child Behavior - psychology
Child, Preschool
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - complications - epidemiology - psychology
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - psychology
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Behavior
Norway - epidemiology
Personality Tests
Prospective Studies
Psychometrics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Abstract
AIMS: To evaluate whether being born small for gestational age (SGA) was associated with an increased frequency of preschool behavioral problems. STUDY DESIGN: Follow-up study at 5 years of age. SUBJECTS: A population based cohort of 318 term infants who were SGA, defined as having a birthweight less than the 15th percentile for gestational age, and without major handicap such as cerebral palsy or mental retardation, and a random control sample of 307 appropriate for gestational age (AGA) infants. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Personality Inventory for Children and the Yale Children's Inventory (completed by the mothers), and child behavior during psychometric testing. RESULTS: Behavior problems was not more common among the SGA children. The results were not confounded by a wide range of parental demographic and child rearing factors, including maternal non-verbal problem solving abilities, child rearing style, and maternal psychological distress. However, the parental factors explained 13% of the variance in a summary score of child behavior compared to 1% explained by SGA vs. AGA status. The SGA children were not more sensitive to the negative impacts of parental risk factors than AGA controls. The study does not address the outcome of severely growth-retarded SGA infants. CONCLUSION: Being born moderately SGA is not a significant risk factor for preschool behavior problems.
PubMed ID
11641032 View in PubMed
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Biometric changes in the eyes of Norwegian university students--a three-year longitudinal study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50905
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1999 Dec;77(6):648-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
B. Kinge
A. Midelfart
G. Jacobsen
J. Rystad
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim. bkinge@online.no
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1999 Dec;77(6):648-52
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aging - pathology
Anterior Eye Segment - pathology - ultrasonography
Biometry - methods
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lens, Crystalline - pathology - ultrasonography
Male
Myopia - diagnosis - etiology
Norway
Questionnaires
Refraction, Ocular
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Students
Universities
Vitreous Body - pathology - ultrasonography
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in biometric measurements and corresponding refractive errors during a three-year period among university students exposed to high educational demands. METHODS: A three-year longitudinal cohort study was performed among 149 Norwegian engineering students (79 females and 70 males, mean age 20.6+/-1.2 years) measuring their refraction and ocular dimensions at the beginning and at the end of the period. The examinations included refraction, keratometry, and A-scan ultrasonographic measurements of the ocular components, all made in cycloplegia. RESULTS: After three years the mean refractive change was -0.52+/-0.45 D (p
PubMed ID
10634556 View in PubMed
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Body proportions and early neonatal morbidity in small-for-gestational-age infants of successive births.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59135
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand Suppl. 1997;165:76-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
T. Vik
T. Markestad
G. Ahlsten
M. Gebre-Medhin
G. Jacobsen
H J Hoffman
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand Suppl. 1997;165:76-81
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Infant, newborn, diseases - epidemiology
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Morbidity
Norway - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Recurrence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We wanted to examine if infants who were small for gestational age (SGA) at term had increased perinatal mortality or morbidity compared to non-SGA infants, and if this could be related to the infant's body proportions, or to whether the mother previously had delivered a low-birthweight infant ("repeater") or not ("non-repeater"). METHODS: From a cohort of 5722 para 1 and para 2 women, we compared perinatal mortality in 541 SGA (birthweight
PubMed ID
9219462 View in PubMed
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Can maternal antiphospholipid antibodies predict the birth of a small-for-gestational age child?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214842
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1995 Jul;74(6):425-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1995
Author
B. Schei
M. Ostensen
T. Moen
G. Jacobsen
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Medical Faculty, University of Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1995 Jul;74(6):425-8
Date
Jul-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antibodies, Anticardiolipin - immunology
Antibodies, Antiphospholipid - immunology
Cohort Studies
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, Third
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Abstract
The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between the maternal level of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPA) measured by anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) and fetal growth retardation (SGA).
A nested case control design was carried out in a prospective cohort study of 1552 para I and para II women. The study group consisted of all 138 women who gave birth to a SGA-child (defined as birthweight
PubMed ID
7604684 View in PubMed
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Cell division in placentas of appropriate and small-for-gestational-age infants. A flow cytometry study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59136
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand Suppl. 1997;165:59-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
T. Markestad
P. Lossius
H. Maartmann-Moe
O E Iversen
R T Lie
P. Bergsjø
G. Jacobsen
H J Hoffman
L S Bakketeig
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Bergen.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand Suppl. 1997;165:59-62
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biopsy
Cell Division
DNA - analysis
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Flow Cytometry
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Placenta - pathology
Predictive value of tests
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine if placentas of small- for-gestational-age (SGA) and non-SGA infants differ with respect to proliferative cell activity. METHOD: Cell cycle distribution was studied in placentas from 181 SGA (birthweight
PubMed ID
9219459 View in PubMed
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[Community services in the prevention of suicide]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68380
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Nov 10;119(27):4075-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-1999
Author
A. Opdahl
P T Jørgensen
A. Hoel
G. Jacobsen
Author Affiliation
Psykiatrisk poliklinikk Regionsykehuset i Trondheim.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Nov 10;119(27):4075-8
Date
Nov-10-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Community Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Patient care team
Social Support
Social Work, Psychiatric
Suicide - prevention & control
PubMed ID
10613101 View in PubMed
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Decompression sickness from saturation diving: a case control study of some diving exposure characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208375
Source
Undersea Hyperb Med. 1997 Jun;24(2):73-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
G. Jacobsen
J E Jacobsen
R E Peterson
J H McLellan
S T Brooke
T. Nome
A O Brubakk
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine and General Practice, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim.
Source
Undersea Hyperb Med. 1997 Jun;24(2):73-80
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Decompression Sickness - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology
Diving - physiology
Humans
Models, Biological
Norway - epidemiology
Stress, Physiological - physiopathology
Abstract
A comprehensive computerized database of diving activity for a Norwegian offshore diving contractor [Stolt-Nielsen Seaway (SNS)] covering the years 1983-1990 has been established. The database contains detailed dive information about 12,087 surface-oriented and 2,622 saturation dives. During this period a majority of the divers were permanently employed. Preliminary analysis had suggested that decompression sickness (DCS) might be the result of exposure to factors causing pathophysiologic effects which accumulate over the course of a single dive or a series of dives. This concept evolved into the HADES (Highest Accumulated Decompression Score) theory which assumes that DCS is predictable once the underlying exposure factors are understood. The incidence of DCS among the SNS divers from saturation diving in the North Sea was studied by use of a "nested" case-control design. Twenty-one case dives (i.e., dives where DCS occurred) were compared with 41 randomly selected control dives. For these dives, several saturation dive characteristics were established. The relative pressure change between maximum and minimum storage depths was significantly greater among the cases. For each 1% increase in the relative pressure change there was a 5% increase in the probability of a saturation dive resulting in DCS. Significantly more cases than controls performed a saturation dive with more than one storage depth, and the data suggested that there were more and greater ascending and descending changes in storage depth conditions among the affected divers.
PubMed ID
9171466 View in PubMed
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44 records – page 1 of 5.