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Abdominal and gynoid adipose distribution and incident myocardial infarction in women and men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143340
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
P. Wiklund
F. Toss
J-H Jansson
M. Eliasson
G. Hallmans
A. Nordström
P W Franks
P. Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine Unit, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2010 Dec;34(12):1752-8
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adipose Tissue - anatomy & histology - radionuclide imaging
Blood Glucose - physiology
Body Composition
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Hypertension - etiology
Hypertriglyceridemia - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - etiology
Obesity - complications
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden
Abstract
The relationships between objectively measured abdominal and gynoid adipose mass with the prospective risk of myocardial infarction (MI) has been scarcely investigated. We aimed to investigate the associations between fat distribution and the risk of MI.
Total and regional fat mass was measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in 2336 women and 922 men, of whom 104 subsequently experienced an MI during a mean follow-up time of 7.8 years.
In women, the strongest independent predictor of MI was the ratio of abdominal to gynoid adipose mass (hazard ratio (HR)=2.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.79-3.32 per s.d. increase in adipose mass), after adjustment for age and smoking. This ratio also showed a strong association with hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and hypertriglyceridemia (P
PubMed ID
20498655 View in PubMed
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Abdominal and gynoid adiposity and the risk of stroke.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136783
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1427-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
F. Toss
P. Wiklund
P W Franks
M. Eriksson
Y. Gustafson
G. Hallmans
P. Nordström
A. Nordström
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2011 Nov;35(11):1427-32
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Fat - pathology - radiography
Absorptiometry, Photon
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body Fat Distribution
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Cohort Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - pathology
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology - pathology - radiography
Proportional Hazards Models
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated that fat distribution is important in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). We investigated the association between fat distribution, as measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), and the incidence of stroke.
A cohort of 2751 men and women aged =40 years was recruited. Baseline levels of abdominal, gynoid and total body fat were measured by DXA. Body mass index (BMI, kg?m(-2)) was calculated. Stroke incidence was recorded using the regional stroke registry until subjects reached 75 years of age.
During a mean follow-up time of 8 years and 9 months, 91 strokes occurred. Of the adiposity indices accessed abdominal fat mass was the best predictor of stroke in women (hazard ratio (HR)=1.66, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.23-2.24 per standard deviation increase), whereas the ratio of gynoid fat to total fat mass was associated with a decreased risk of stroke (HR=0.72, 95% CI=0.54-0.96). Abdominal fat mass was the only of the adiposity indices assessed that was found to be a significant predictor of stroke in men (HR=1.49, 95% CI=1.06-2.09). The associations between abdominal fat mass and stroke remained significant in both women and men after adjustment for BMI (HR=1.80, 95% CI=1.06-3.07; HR=1.71, 95% CI=1.13-2.59, respectively). However, in a subgroup analyses abdominal fat was not a significant predictor after further adjustment for diabetes, smoking and hypertension.
Abdominal fat mass is a risk factor for stroke independent of BMI, but not independent of diabetes, smoking and hypertension. This indicates that the excess in stroke risk associated with abdominal fat mass is at least partially mediated through traditional stroke risk factors.
PubMed ID
21343905 View in PubMed
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Active commuting reduces the risk of wrist fractures in middle-aged women-the UFO study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125017
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Feb;24(2):533-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2013
Author
U. Englund
P. Nordström
J. Nilsson
G. Hallmans
O. Svensson
U. Bergström
U. Pettersson-Kymmer
Author Affiliation
Division of Geriatric Medicine, Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation, Umeå University, 901 87, Umeå, Sweden. undis.englund@germed.umu.se
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2013 Feb;24(2):533-40
Date
Feb-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Exercise - physiology
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Osteoporotic Fractures - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Seasons
Sweden - epidemiology
Transportation - methods
Wrist Injuries - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Abstract
Middle-aged women with active commuting had significantly lower risk for wrist fracture than women commuting by car/bus.
Our purpose was to investigate whether a physically active lifestyle in middle-aged women was associated with a reduced risk of later sustaining a low-trauma wrist fracture.
The Umeå Fracture and Osteoporosis (UFO) study is a population-based nested case-control study investigating associations between lifestyle and fragility fractures. From a cohort of ~35,000 subjects, we identified 376 female wrist fracture cases who had reported data regarding their commuting habits, occupational, and leisure physical activity, before they sustained their fracture. Each fracture case was compared with at least one control drawn from the same cohort and matched for age and week of reporting data, yielding a total of 778 subjects. Mean age at baseline was 54.3?±?5.8 years, and mean age at fracture was 60.3?±?5.8 years.
Conditional logistic regression analysis with adjustments for height, body mass index, smoking, and menopausal status showed that subjects with active commuting (especially walking) were at significantly lower risk of sustaining a wrist fracture (OR 0.48; 95 % CI 0.27-0.88) compared with those who commuted by car or bus. Leisure time activities such as dancing and snow shoveling were also associated with a lower fracture risk, whereas occupational activity, training, and leisure walking or cycling were unrelated to fracture risk.
This study suggests that active commuting is associated with a lower wrist fracture risk, in middle-aged women.
PubMed ID
22525983 View in PubMed
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[A national document on clinical nutrition. Developmental work for improvement of medical education]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61936
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Apr 30;94(18):1731-4, 1739
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-30-1997
Author
G. Akner
H. Andersson
E. Forsum
G. Hallmans
P. Thesleff
B. Vessby
Author Affiliation
Karolinska sjukhuset, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1997 Apr 30;94(18):1731-4, 1739
Date
Apr-30-1997
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Dietary Services
Education, Medical
Educational Measurement
Food Habits
Humans
Nutrition
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Support
Sweden
PubMed ID
9182183 View in PubMed
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Anticardiolipin antibodies are not an independent risk factor for stroke: an incident case-referent study nested within the MONICA and Västerbotten cohort project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature47865
Source
Stroke. 2000 Jun;31(6):1289-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2000
Author
E. Ahmed
B. Stegmayr
J. Trifunovic
L. Weinehall
G. Hallmans
A K Lefvert
Author Affiliation
Immunological Research Unit, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Stroke. 2000 Jun;31(6):1289-93
Date
Jun-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Anticardiolipin - blood
Autoimmune Diseases - epidemiology - immunology
Brain Ischemia - epidemiology - immunology
Case-Control Studies
Cerebral Infarction - epidemiology - immunology
Cerebrovascular Accident - epidemiology - immunology
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Disease Susceptibility
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Immunoglobulin A - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin G - blood - immunology
Immunoglobulin M - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL) have been proposed to be an independent risk factor for stroke. To test this hypothesis, a nested case-control study was performed to compare aCL with the other known risk factors for stroke. METHODS: Within the framework of the World Health Organization Multinational Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease (MONICA) project and the Västerbotten Intervention Program (VIP) health survey, 44 725 men and women were enrolled and followed up from January 1, 1985, through August 31, 1996. Individuals free from cardiovascular events were followed up, and 123 developed stroke (on average, 34.1 months after blood sampling; 21 cerebral hemorrhage and 102 cerebral infarction); they were compared with 241 age- and sex-matched control subjects from the same population. ELISA was used for the analysis of IgG, IgM, and IgA aCL. RESULTS: IgM-aCL were present in 11.4% of patients (14/123) who developed stroke and in 4. 1% of individuals (10/241) who remained healthy (P=0.013, OR 2.97, 95% CI 1.28 to 6.89). The OR for the levels of IgM-aCL was 1.34 (P=0. 01, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.68) without adjustment for other risk factors and 1.24 when adjusted for hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cigarette smoking, and use of smokeless tobacco (P=0.077, 95% CI 0. 98 to 1.56). There was no difference between patients and controls for the prevalence or level of IgG-aCL and IgA-aCL and also no difference between patients with cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction for the prevalence of all 3 isotypes of aCL. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that aCL are associated with future stroke but do not constitute an independent risk factor.
Notes
Comment In: Stroke. 2001 May;32(5):1234-711340241
PubMed ID
10835446 View in PubMed
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Bioavailability of selenium from bovine milk as assessed in subjects with ileostomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61573
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Feb;58(2):350-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
J. Chen
H. Lindmark-Månsson
M. Drevelius
P. Tidehag
G. Hallmans
E. Hertervig
A. Nilsson
B. Akesson
Author Affiliation
Biomedical Nutrition, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2004 Feb;58(2):350-5
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Biological Availability
Comparative Study
Cultured Milk Products - metabolism
Diet
Dietary Fats
Female
Humans
Ileostomy
Intestinal Absorption
Male
Middle Aged
Milk - chemistry - metabolism
Pilot Projects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Selenium - administration & dosage - pharmacokinetics
Sweden
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the absorption of dietary selenium in humans, especially of milk selenium. DESIGN:: 1-day meal studies in subjects with ileostomy. SETTING: Hospital outpatient clinics. SUBJECTS: Three subjects in the pilot study and nine subjects in the main study (eight men/ four women). INTERVENTION: Different beverages, 1 l/day, were given in addition to basal diets (soft drink, 1 week; low-fat milk, 3 weeks; fermented low-fat milk, 3 weeks and soft drink, 1 week). Ileostomy effluents were collected during the last 2 days in each of the four periods. RESULTS: On days when the subjects were given 1 l of low-fat milk, the estimated fractional absorption of total dietary selenium was 65.5 (2.3)% (mean (s.d.), n=18), which was similar to the value when fermented low-fat milk was given (64.1 (3.2)%). However, both the calculated amount of milk selenium absorbed (10.9 (2.4) vs 9.4 (1.7) microg selenium) and its fractional absorption (73.3 (16.1) vs 64.1 (11.2)%, n=18) were significantly higher for milk than for fermented milk. CONCLUSIONS: Selenium from milk and other sources is well absorbed in subjects with ileostomy. The real absorption may be even higher than the values shown.
PubMed ID
14749757 View in PubMed
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Blood lipids and diet in Swedish adolescents living in Norsjö, an area with high incidence of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature48660
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Jun-Jul;80(6-7):667-74
Publication Type
Article
Author
B. Larsson
I. Johansson
G. Hellsten
G. Hallmans
T. Ericson
A. Bruce
Author Affiliation
Department of Cariology, University of Umea, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1991 Jun-Jul;80(6-7):667-74
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Blood pressure
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Comparative Study
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - etiology
Diet
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins, HDL Cholesterol - blood
Lipoproteins, LDL Cholesterol - blood
Male
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
In Norsjö in Northern Sweden a cardiovascular intervention programme, for adults is presently tested. The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of factors related to cardiovascular disease in all 15-year-old adolescents living in Norsjö in 1987 and 1988. The total cholesterol concentration in serum, as an average for the test period, was 4.2 mmol/l and 4.7 mmol/l for boys and girls, respectively. Fourteen per cent of the boys and 32% of the girls had a total cholesterol concentration exceeding 5 mmol/l. Twenty-seven per cent of the adolescents had high values for two or more variables related to risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The evaluation of the dietary registrations showed unsatisfactory values for fibre, P/S ratio and total fat. The dietary habits were better in the 15-year-olds in 1988 than in 1987 as judged by significantly higher average daily intake of fibre as well as a higher content of fibre per megajoule in the food.
PubMed ID
1867085 View in PubMed
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Can a sustainable community intervention reduce the health gap?--10-year evaluation of a Swedish community intervention program for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53844
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2001;56:59-68
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
L. Weinehall
G. Hellsten
K. Boman
G. Hallmans
K. Asplund
S. Wall
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. Lars.Weinehall@epiph.umu.se
Source
Scand J Public Health Suppl. 2001;56:59-68
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control
Community Health Planning - organization & administration
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Pilot Projects
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Public Health Practice
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rural Health
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: This paper evaluates the 10-year outcomes of a Northern Sweden community intervention program for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), with special reference to the social patterning of risk development. METHODS: Using a quasi-experimental design, trends in risk factors and predicted mortality in an intervention area (Norsjö municipality) are compared with those in a reference area (Northern Sweden region) by repeated independent cross-sectional surveys. RESULTS: There were significant differences in changes in total cholesterol level and systolic blood pressure between the intervention and reference populations. The predicted coronary heart disease mortality (based on the North Karelia risk equation). after adjustment for age and education, was reduced by 36% in the intervention area and by 1% in the reference area. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that a long-term community-based CVD prevention program which combines population and individual strategies can substantially promote a health shift in CVD risk in a high risk rural population. When evaluated for different social strata, we found no signs of an increasing health gap between socially privileged and less privileged groups. Socially less-privileged groups benefited the most from the present prevention program.
PubMed ID
11681565 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular disease risk factors and dental caries in adolescents: effect of a preventive program in Northern Sweden (the Norsjö project).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature72801
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1997 Jan;86(1):63-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1997
Author
B. Larsson
I. Johansson
L. Weinehall
G. Hallmans
T. Ericson
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1997 Jan;86(1):63-71
Date
Jan-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Caries - prevention & control
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Parents - education
Prevalence
Preventive Health Services - organization & administration
Program Evaluation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden
Abstract
Since 1985 a 10 year prevention programme aiming to reduce cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been running in the county of Västerbotten in Northern Sweden. The project started in Norsjö. The present investigation is a study on dietary intake, medical CVD risk factors and dental caries in five cross-sectional groups of 15-year-olds during 5 years (1987-1991) of the "Norsjö project". Most of the measured medical and dietary variables followed a similar trend, i.e. a positive trend during the first 3 years (1987-1989) and in the last 2 years (1990-1991) the averages returned towards baseline values. Dental caries prevalence followed a similar trend. Parental educational level did not have a major influence on diet or medical CVD risk factors, but higher caries scores were noted in adolescents with parents with "low" education compared with adolescents where the parents had higher educational levels. The results from the study also point to the fact that dental caries prevalence together with body mass index may indicate adolescents with CVD risk factors at unfavourable levels. Dietary counselling by dental personnel to adolescents with high caries and moderate obesity can be of advantage in reducing caries risk, as well as risk for development of CVD at higher ages.
PubMed ID
9116429 View in PubMed
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Carotenoids, alpha-tocopherols, and retinol in plasma and breast cancer risk in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19594
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Aug;12(6):529-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
K. Hultén
A L Van Kappel
A. Winkvist
R. Kaaks
G. Hallmans
P. Lenner
E. Riboli
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Umeå University, Sweden. kerstin.hulten@epiph.umu.se
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2001 Aug;12(6):529-37
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Biological Markers - blood
Breast Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carotenoids - blood
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Lutein - blood
Middle Aged
Postmenopause - blood
Premenopause - blood
Proportional Hazards Models
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin A - blood
alpha-Tocopherol - blood
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Using a nested case-referent design we evaluated the relationship between plasma levels of six carotenoids, alpha-tocopherol, and retinol, sampled before diagnosis, and later breast cancer risk. METHODS: In total, 201 cases and 290 referents were selected from three population-based cohorts in northern Sweden, where all subjects donated blood samples at enrolment. All blood samples were stored at -80 degrees C. Cases and referents were matched for age, age of blood sample, and sampling centre. Breast cancer cases were identified through the regional and national cancer registries. RESULTS: Plasma concentrations of carotenoids were positively intercorrelated. In analysis of three cohorts as a group none of the carotenoids was found to be significantly related to the risk of developing breast cancer. Similarly, no significant associations between breast cancer risk and plasma levels of alpha-tocopherol or retinol were found. However, in postmenopausal women from a mammography cohort with a high number of prevalent cases, lycopene was significantly associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer. A significant trend of an inverse association between lutein and breast cancer risk was seen in premenopausal women from two combined population-based cohorts with only incident cases. A non-significant reduced risk with higher plasma alpha-carotene was apparent throughout all the sub-analyses. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, no significant associations were found between plasma levels of carotenoids, alpha-tocopherol or retinol and breast cancer risk in analysis of three combined cohorts. However, results from stratified analysis by cohort membership and menopausal status suggest that lycopene and other plasma-carotenoids may reduce the risk of developing breast cancer and that menopausal status has an impact on the mechanisms involved.
PubMed ID
11519761 View in PubMed
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