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Adiponectin levels measured in dried blood spot samples from neonates born small and appropriate for gestational age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162263
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
A. Klamer
K. Skogstrand
D M Hougaard
B. Nørgaard-Petersen
A. Juul
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology (section 5021), National University Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. anja.klamer@rh.dk
Source
Eur J Endocrinol. 2007 Aug;157(2):189-94
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiponectin - blood
Birth Weight - physiology
Body Weight - physiology
Cross Reactions - physiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature - blood
Infant, Small for Gestational Age - blood
Male
Maternal Age
Abstract
Adiponectin levels measured in neonatal dried blood spot samples (DBSS) might be affected by both prematurity and being born small for gestational age (SGA). The aim of the study was to measure adiponectin levels in routinely collected neonatal DBSS taken on day 5 (range 3-12) postnatal from infants.
A retrospective case-control study.
One hundred and twenty-two infants: 62 very premature (34 SGA) and 60 mature infants (27 SGA). Adiponectin concentrations were determined in stored neonatal DBSS using a sandwich immunoassay based on flow metric Luminex xMap technology.
Adiponectin was measurable in all samples, and repeated measurements correlated significantly (r = 0.94). Adiponectin concentrations were negatively associated with both SGA (B = -0.283, P = 0.04) and prematurity (B = -2.194, P
PubMed ID
17656597 View in PubMed
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Source
Arch Pediatr. 1999;6 Suppl 2:267s-268s
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
D. Mai
K. Borch
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Unité de néonatologie, Rigshospitalet, Copenhague, Danemark.
Source
Arch Pediatr. 1999;6 Suppl 2:267s-268s
Date
1999
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Denmark
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Parents - education
Patient Discharge
PubMed ID
10370503 View in PubMed
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Cerebral palsy births in eastern Denmark, 1987--90: implications for neonatal care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32043
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2001 Jul;15(3):271-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2001
Author
M. Topp
P. Uldall
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
The Cerebral Palsy Registry in Denmark, National Institute of Public Health, Copenhagen, Denmark. monica.topp@dadlnet.dk
Source
Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2001 Jul;15(3):271-7
Date
Jul-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cerebral Palsy - epidemiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Prevalence
Registries
Respiration, Artificial
Risk factors
Abstract
The Cerebral Palsy Register in eastern Denmark has collected cases using a uniform data sampling procedure since birth year 1979. We have investigated changes in the rate of cerebral palsy, related to gestational age, mortality and perinatal risk factors in children born 1983--90. The total cerebral palsy birth prevalence decreased from 3.0 in the birth year period 1983--86 to 2.4 per 1000 live births (P
PubMed ID
11489156 View in PubMed
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[Choice of treatment in very premature deliveries. A nation-wide questionnaire study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59939
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jun 19;151(25):1612-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-19-1989
Author
G. Greisen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jun 19;151(25):1612-4
Date
Jun-19-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Denmark
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature, Diseases - therapy
Obstetric Labor, Premature - therapy
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - therapy
Respiration, Artificial
Resuscitation
Abstract
The principles for treatment of very premature deliveries in obstetric, surgical and paediatric departments were investigated by means of a questionnaire. This contained fictitious case histories about transfer in cases of threatened delivery, caesarean section in cases of interuterine asphyxia, resuscitation after delivery, transfer to a paediatric department and employment of respirators in cases of increasing respiratory difficulty following deliveries after 24, 26 and 28 full weeks of pregnancy. Replies were obtained from 26 out of 29 maternity departments, 28 out of 33 surgical departments with more than 100 deliveries in 1985, and 18 out of 18 paediatric departments. In all of the situations, considerable restraint was expressed as regard the most premature deliveries. For example, only two obstetric departments, two surgical and four paediatric departments stated that they would, as a rule, attempt resuscitation after deliveries at gestational ages of 24 weeks. For deliveries at 26 weeks, the figures were 18, 12 and 12, respectively. A certain tendency was observed for less restraint in 1985 as compared with 1979. Tendencies to centralize the very premature deliveries were greater in East Denmark than in West Denmark where respirator treatment was more frequently employed for the smallest infants.
PubMed ID
2781627 View in PubMed
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Comparing minimally invasive and proactive initial management of extremely preterm infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262187
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2014 Aug;103(8):827-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
A. Lando
K. Kure Østergaard
G. Greisen
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2014 Aug;103(8):827-32
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant mortality
Infant, Extremely Premature
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - methods
Respiration, Artificial - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
In 2005, we changed our minimally invasive departmental policy for infants born before 26 weeks of gestation to a proactive approach. This included structured guidelines as well as intubation and surfactant in the delivery room, if the parents agreed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of this change of policy.
We compared the Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ) scores, mortality rates and use of mechanical ventilation before (1999-2003) and after (2005-2011) the introduction of the new policy.
Twenty-two per cent of 61 infants in the before group had an ASQ z-score of
Notes
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PubMed ID
24750177 View in PubMed
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Detection of small-for-gestational-age fetuses by ultrasound screening in a high risk population: a randomized controlled study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59608
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1992 Jun;99(6):469-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1992
Author
T. Larsen
J F Larsen
S. Petersen
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Ultrasound, Herlev University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1992 Jun;99(6):469-74
Date
Jun-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Embryonic and Fetal Development
Female
Fetal Growth Retardation - mortality - ultrasonography
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal
Morbidity
Postnatal Care
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ultrasonography, Prenatal
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the value of fetal weight estimation during routine third trimester ultrasound examinations for the identification of small-for-gestational-age (SGA) fetuses, to promote active pregnancy management and so reduce perinatal morbidity. DESIGN: A prospective controlled randomized study. SETTING: Outpatient clinic at the Department of Obstetrics, Herlev University Hospital, Denmark. SUBJECTS: One thousand pregnant women considered at risk were selected consecutively from April 1985 to September 1987 and randomized to either a revealed-results group or a withheld-results group. INTERVENTION: All the women had an early ultrasound examination for estimation of gestational age. Both groups had routine ultrasound estimates of fetal weight after 28 weeks and then every third week until delivery. The results were available for clinical use only in the revealed group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Number of interventions during pregnancy (admission to hospital, elective delivery), emergency intervention during labour, and fetal outcome. RESULTS: Revealing the results of ultrasound estimates of fetal weight for gestational age during the third trimester resulted in statistically significantly increased diagnosis of SGA fetuses, of elective deliveries based on this diagnosis, and of healthy preterm babies admitted to the neonatal care unit, but no detectable overall improvement in weight for gestational age at birth, or in neonatal morbidity or mortality. CONCLUSION: This method of screening improved the diagnosis of SGA fetuses, but this was not followed by improved fetal outcome.
PubMed ID
1637761 View in PubMed
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Early nasal continuous positive airway pressure in a cohort of the smallest infants in Denmark: neurodevelopmental outcome at five years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30426
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):190-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Bo M Hansen
B. Hoff
G. Greisen
E L Mortensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology, JMC Section 5021, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. moelholm@dadlnet.dk
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):190-5
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anthropometry
Brain - abnormalities
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Developmental Disabilities - epidemiology - physiopathology
Disability Evaluation
Echoencephalography
Follow-Up Studies
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Observation
Positive-Pressure Respiration - methods
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration, Artificial
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
AIM: To evaluate neurodevelopmental outcome at age 5 y of age in a cohort of preterm children treated mainly with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in the neonatal period. METHODS: A national prospective observational study was conducted in Denmark which included all 269 surviving children with a birthweight below 1000 g or a gestational age below 28 wk born in Denmark in between 1994 and 1995. A total of 164 children (61%) had been treated with nasal CPAP only in the neonatal period. A reference group (n = 76) of term children was studied in parallel. RESULTS: Of the 269 surviving children, 252 (94%) were examined. Twenty-four children (10%) had cerebral palsy, and three children were blind. No case of hearing impairment was detected. Nineteen percent of the index children had an IQ score
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):14815046260
PubMed ID
15046272 View in PubMed
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[Emergency transport of newborn infants--fetch or bring?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58659
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Feb 19;163(8):1093-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-19-2001
Author
M. Arrøe
J. Steensgård
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
H:S Rigshospitalet, Neonatalklinikken.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Feb 19;163(8):1093-7
Date
Feb-19-2001
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances
Denmark
English Abstract
Hospitals, University
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intensive Care, Neonatal - manpower - methods
Patient care team
Patient Transfer - manpower - methods
Risk factors
Time and Motion Studies
Transportation of Patients - manpower - methods
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Neonatal transport is difficult and often associated with problems. In 1998, the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, University Hospital of Copenhagen, H:S Rigshospitalet, set up a neonatal transport team. The aim of this study was to assess whether a better quality of high risk transport could justify the increased consumption of time. METHOD: The schedules for observation and assessment filled in by the transport team were collected and compared with records of the transport of high-risk neonates by local transport. The comparison consisted in the number of infants, severity of the problems, interventions carried out either locally or after arrival at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, and the condition of the infants judged on the pH, blood sugar level, blood pressure, and body temperature. RESULTS: The neonatal transport team fetched 68 high-risk infants, whereas 140 high-risk infants were brought by local transport. Infants fetched by the transport team were more sick, both before and during transport, than those brought to us. On arrival at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, more infants brought by local transport had problems (31% vs 16%): 12 (9%) transports had more than one critical problem, in contrast to none of the infants fetched by the transport team. The transport team carried out 71 interventions on 44 of the 68 infants (65%). These interventions explain the better condition of the infants on arrival. Acute interventions soon after arrival at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit were carried out on 91 of the 140 infants brought by local transport (65%). DISCUSSION: Neonatal transport of extremely ill infants is difficult. A specialised (transport) team with local stabilisation and transport reduces the frequency of complications. The number of high-risk neonates transported is so small that it is improbable that adequate expertise can be built up and maintained locally.
PubMed ID
11242669 View in PubMed
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Meaningful care for babies born after 22, 23 or 24 weeks.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30429
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):153-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
G. Greisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neonatology, 5024 Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, DK-2100 Copenhagen O, Denmark. greisen@rh.dk
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):153-4
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Disabled Children
Evidence-Based Medicine
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Intensive Care, Neonatal - organization & administration - standards
Abstract
The dilemma of proper treatment of very low-birthweight infants is discussed. CONCLUSION: Professionals should be aware of the data in order to consider the chances of every baby and to engage in the relationship with the family, care team and society.
Notes
Comment On: Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):149-5215046261
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2004 Feb;93(2):14815046260
PubMed ID
15046262 View in PubMed
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[Perinatal growth. A practical perinatal growth curve]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59932
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 10;151(28):1813-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-10-1989
Author
G. Greisen
K F Michaelsen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1989 Jul 10;151(28):1813-5
Date
Jul-10-1989
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Embryonic and Fetal Development
English Abstract
Female
Gestational Age
Growth
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Reference Values
Abstract
A linear perinatal growth curve, covering the period from 28 weeks gestation to 18 weeks after term birth is presented. The curve was first presented 15 years ago, and is now supported by Danish data, both cross-sectional and longitudinal. It may be used for classification of birth weight in relation to gestational age and at the same time for monitoring of postnatal growth, regardless of gestational age at birth. Limitations of empirical curves are pointed out. The postnatal growth potential of preterm infants is stressed.
PubMed ID
2773087 View in PubMed
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23 records – page 1 of 3.