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50 years of screening in the Nordic countries: quantifying the effects on cervical cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257546
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2014
Author
S. Vaccarella
S. Franceschi
G. Engholm
S. Lönnberg
S. Khan
F. Bray
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon cedex 08, France.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Date
Aug-26-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Early Detection of Cancer - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening - methods
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
Nordic countries' data offer a unique possibility to evaluate the long-term benefit of cervical cancer screening in a context of increasing risk of human papillomavirus infection.
Ad hoc-refined age-period-cohort models were applied to the last 50-year incidence data from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden to project expected cervical cancer cases in a no-screening scenario.
In the absence of screening, projected incidence rates for 2006-2010 in Nordic countries would have been between 3 and 5 times higher than observed rates. Over 60,000 cases or between 41 and 49% of the expected cases of cervical cancer may have been prevented by the introduction of screening in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Our study suggests that screening programmes might have prevented a HPV-driven epidemic of cervical cancer in Nordic countries. According to extrapolations from cohort effects, cervical cancer incidence rates in the Nordic countries would have been otherwise comparable to the highest incidence rates currently detected in low-income countries.
PubMed ID
24992581 View in PubMed
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Abnormal Papanicolaou smear. A population-based study of risk factors in Greenlandic and Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25362
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
S K Kjaer
P. Poll
H. Jensen
G. Engholm
B J Haugaard
C. Teisen
R B Christensen
K A Möller
B F Vestergaard
E M de Villiers
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(1):79-86
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Contraception Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Greenland
Herpes Genitalis - complications
Humans
Papillomavirus
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior
Smoking
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - diagnosis - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
Possible risk factors for abnormal Papanicolaou smear were investigated in a population-based cross-sectional study. From Nuuk (Greenland) and Nykøbing Falster (Denmark), random samples of 800 women aged 20-39 years were drawn. Totals of 586 and 661 women were included in Greenland and Denmark, respectively. All women went through a personal interview, and had a gynecologic examination including a PAP smear and cervical swab for HPV analysis. A blood sample was taken for analysis of HSV type specific antibodies. Multiple sexual partners was the most important risk factor for abnormal cervical cytology (OR = 4.2). An infectious etiology was also indirectly supported by a relatively protective effect of barrier contraceptive methods (OR = 0.6). The simultaneous finding of HPV 16/18 as a significant risk factor (OR = 2.4) cannot be taken uncritically as support for a causal effect of this HPV type, since such a relationship between cytological changes of the cervix and HPV infection could also emerge if the positive PAP smear was not just a measure of intra-epithelial neoplasia but also an expression of the infection itself on the cervix.
PubMed ID
2161172 View in PubMed
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Association between alcoholism and diverticulitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201074
Source
Br J Surg. 1999 Aug;86(8):1067-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
H. Tønnesen
G. Engholm
H. Moller
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Br J Surg. 1999 Aug;86(8):1067-8
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diverticulum - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Registries
Risk factors
PubMed ID
10460645 View in PubMed
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Birth order and risk of testicular cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24450
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 May;3(3):265-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
A. Prener
C C Hsieh
G. Engholm
D. Trichopoulos
O M Jensen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Registry, Copenhagen.
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 1992 May;3(3):265-72
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth Order
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Denmark - epidemiology
Family Characteristics
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Medical Records - standards
Nurse Midwives
Registries
Risk factors
School Health Services
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Abstract
To explore the etiology of testicular cancer, cases of testicular cancer were identified among members of a cohort of Danish boys born between 1941 and 1957 (inclusive), who had attended schools in Copenhagen and Gentofte and whose school health records were contained in an archive under the supervision of the Danish Cancer Registry. One hundred and eighty-three cases of testicular cancer diagnosed before 31 December 1984 were identified; 366 controls, matched to cases by sex and age, were selected from the same cohort. Information on potential risk factors and confounders was obtained from two sources: school health records and midwife protocols, both of which were recorded prior to the diagnosis of testicular cancer in cases. Relative risks (RR) approximated by the odds ratios were calculated and, in logistic regression analyses, adjustments were done for known or suspected confounders. A decreasing risk of testicular cancer with increasing birth order was observed (P = 0.020). Compared with being firstborn, being number four or more in birth order was associated with a significantly decreased RR for all testicular cancers (RR = 0.3, 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 0.3-0.8) and testicular seminoma (RR = 0.1, CI = 0.02-0.9). No association was observed between high social class and the risk of testicular cancer (RR = 1.4, CI = 0.8-2.3); neither was age at which the study subjects had mumps or measles related to risk of testicular cancer. No cases of mumps orchitis were observed before or during school years. A slightly increased RR for testicular cancer among boys from small families could be explained by the association between family size and birth order.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1610973 View in PubMed
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Source
Acta Oncol. 1990;29(3):287-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
T W Davies
A. Prener
G. Engholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, England.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1990;29(3):287-90
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anthropometry
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Obesity - complications
Risk factors
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
In the search for possible causes for the enormous increase in testicular cancer incidence in Denmark, we tested the hypothesis that a high fat or calorie intake in adolescence and consequently relative obesity is a promotional factor for testicular cancer. A total of 438 cases and three controls for each case were included in the study. Data originated from health examination of men liable for military service. Data were analysed by logistic regression analysis. No systematic statistically significant differences in body measurements [height, weight and body-mass index (weight/height2)] could be shown. Rather than being obese a slight trend was observed towards the future victims of testicular cancer being lighter, smaller and thinner than unaffected controls.
PubMed ID
2363939 View in PubMed
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Body size and prostate cancer: a 20-year follow-up study among 135006 Swedish construction workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22154
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Mar 5;89(5):385-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-5-1997
Author
S O Andersson
A. Wolk
R. Bergström
H O Adami
G. Engholm
A. Englund
O. Nyrén
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Orebro Medical Center, Sweden.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 1997 Mar 5;89(5):385-9
Date
Mar-5-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Poisson Distribution
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Questionnaires
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with endocrine changes (e.g., increased estrogen and decreased testosterone in the blood) that have been implicated in the cause of prostate cancer and, therefore, an association between body weight and the risk of developing prostate cancer would be expected. However, because of bias or low statistical power in previous epidemiologic studies, associations between anthropometric measurements (height and weight), body mass index (BMI), and the risk of prostate cancer may have been inadvertently overlooked. PURPOSE: We performed a large, retrospective cohort study among Swedish construction workers to evaluate possible associations of adult weight, height, BMI, and lean body mass (LBM) by age at entry in the study with the incidence and mortality rate of prostate cancer. METHODS: We analyzed data that had been compiled in a computerized central register on a cohort of approximately 135000 male construction workers. Information on height and weight had been collected with the use of a comprehensive questionnaire filled out by nurses at the time of enrollment in the cohort, from 1971 through 1975. Complete follow-up was achieved through 1991 by means of record linkage to the Swedish National Cancer Register, the Death Register, and the Migration Register. A total of 2368 incident cases and 708 deaths from prostate cancer occurred in the cohort during a follow-up period averaging 18 years. We used only information obtained at the index visit from 1971 through 1975 to determine age-adjusted rate ratios (RRs) in a Poisson-based multiplicative multivariate model with age and the relevant exposure variable (e.g., weight, height, BMI, and LBM) as independent variables. RESULTS: All anthropometric measurements were positively associated with the risk of prostate cancer and were more strongly related to mortality than to incidence. The excess risk of death from prostate cancer was statistically significant in all BMI categories above the reference category: RR = 1.40 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.09-1.81) in the highest category compared with the lowest (P for trend = .04). For height and LBM, the excess risk in the highest compared with the lowest categories was somewhat less pronounced: RR = 1.28 (95% CI = 1.02-1.60) and RR = 1.26 (95% CI = 1.02-1.57), respectively. Statistically significant linear dose-response relationships were also found with the incidence of prostate cancer, with the exception of BMI (P for trend = .10). CONCLUSION: Our large cohort study indicates that various aspects of body size are related to the risk of prostate cancer and that future studies are needed to study the role of body size and prostate cancer.
PubMed ID
9060961 View in PubMed
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Bowen's disease and internal malignant diseases. A study of 581 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25860
Source
Arch Dermatol. 1988 May;124(5):677-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1988
Author
F. Reymann
L. Ravnborg
G. Schou
G. Engholm
A. Osterlind
K. Thestrup-Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Dermatology, Finsen Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Arch Dermatol. 1988 May;124(5):677-9
Date
May-1988
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bowen's Disease - complications
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - complications
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Multiple Primary - diagnosis - epidemiology
Registries
Sex Factors
Skin Neoplasms - complications
Abstract
In a retrospective study of 581 patients with a diagnosis of Bowen's disease (BD) treated over a 40-year period, we traced patient records to identify later diagnoses of nonskin cancer. Fifty patients had nonskin cancer, as against an expected number of 40, but this difference was not significant. The lack of association was equally true for BD on sun-exposed and non-sun-exposed skin. Our findings support the view that BD is not a skin marker for internal malignant disease.
PubMed ID
3364992 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer incidence subsequent to surgical reduction of the female breast.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22707
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Apr;73(7):961-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
M. Baasch
S F Nielsen
G. Engholm
K. Lund
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Br J Cancer. 1996 Apr;73(7):961-3
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Breast - pathology - surgery
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertrophy - surgery
Incidence
Mammaplasty
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Abstract
The incidence of breast cancer among 1240 women who were treated surgically for breast hypertrophy in Copenhagen, Denmark between 1943 and 1971 was determined and compared with age- and calendar period-specific rates for the Danish female population. A total of 32 cases of breast cancer had developed by the end of 1990; the expected number was 52.55, yielding a relative risk (RR) of 0.61 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.42-0.86]. The greatest reduction in risk was observed for women who had 600 g or more of breast tissue removed (RR=0.30; 95% CI 0.10-0.69). This suggests that the number of potential foci is important for cancer development in the female breast. In the group of women who were operated on before the age of 20, four cases of breast cancer developed, compared with 2.23 expected cases, to give an RR of 1.79, suggesting that the aetiology of their breast hypertrophy may be different from that for the rest of the group.
PubMed ID
8611415 View in PubMed
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Bronchitis and exposure to man-made mineral fibres in non-smoking construction workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature68081
Source
Eur J Respir Dis Suppl. 1982;118:73-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982
Author
G. Engholm
G. von Schmalensee
Source
Eur J Respir Dis Suppl. 1982;118:73-8
Date
1982
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asbestos - adverse effects
Bronchitis - epidemiology - etiology
Construction Materials - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Minerals - adverse effects
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Questionnaires
Silicon Dioxide - adverse effects
Smoking
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the possible association between bronchitis and exposure to man-made mineral fibres. The basis of the study has been cross-sectional data from the early 70's describing some 135,000 male Swedish construction workers. Data included information about exposure to asbestos and man-made mineral fibres, smoking habits and questions concerning symptoms of bronchitis. In non-smokers the rate-ratio of people exposed at least 3 years to non-exposed people is 2.68. In former smokers and in present smokers the corresponding values are 1.67 and 1.51 respectively.
PubMed ID
6284537 View in PubMed
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61 records – page 1 of 7.