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103 records – page 1 of 11.

Alcoholic intemperance, coronary heart disease and mortality in middle-aged Swedish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature12630
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;222(3):201-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
A. Rosengren
L. Wilhelmsen
K. Pennert
G. Berglund
D. Elmfeldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;222(3):201-13
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Alcoholism - complications - mortality
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
High alcohol consumption is one of the major risk indicators for premature death in middle-aged men. An indicator of alcohol abuse--registration with the social authorities for alcoholic problems--was used to evaluate the role of alcohol in relation to general and cause-specific mortality in a general population sample. Altogether 1,116 men (11%) out of a total population of 10,004 men were registered for alcoholic problems. Total mortality during 11.8 years' follow-up was 10.4% among the non-registered men, compared to 20.5% among men with occasional convictions for drunkenness and 29.6% among heavy abusers. Fatal cancer as a whole was not independently associated with alcohol abuse, but oropharyngeal and oesophageal cancers together were seven times more common in the alcohol-registered groups. Total coronary heart disease (CHD) was significantly and independently associated with alcohol abuse, but nearly all the excess CHD mortality among the alcohol-registered men could be attributed to sudden coronary death. Cases with definite recent myocardial infarction were not more common in the alcoholic population. A combined effect of coronary arteriosclerosis and heart muscle damage secondary to alcohol abuse is suggested. Other causes of death strongly associated with registration for alcohol abuse include pulmonary embolism, pneumonia and peptic ulcer, as well as death from liver cirrhosis and alcoholism. Of the excess mortality among alcohol-registered subjects, 20.1% could be attributed to CHD, 18.1% to violent death, 13.6% to alcoholism without another diagnosis and 11.1% to liver cirrhosis.
PubMed ID
3425375 View in PubMed
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Angina pectoris, intermittent claudication and congestive heart failure in middle-aged male hypertensives. Development and predictive factors during long-term antihypertensive care. The Primary Preventive Trial, Göteborg, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46729
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;221(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
O. Samuelsson
L. Wilhelmsen
K. Pennert
G. Berglund
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1987;221(1):23-32
Date
1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actuarial Analysis
Angina Pectoris - etiology - prevention & control
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure, Congestive - etiology - prevention & control
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy
Intermittent Claudication - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk
Abstract
A group of middle-aged male hypertensives, derived from a random sample of a Swedish urban population, has been treated and followed for 10 years. The development of angina pectoris, intermittent claudication and congestive heart failure have been analysed. The initial prevalence and the average yearly incidence of angina pectoris was 3.9% and 1.3% p.a., of intermittent claudication 1.7% and 0.6% p.a. and of heart failure 1.0% and 0.8% p.a. ECG signs indicating subclinical heart disease (major Q wave, ST depression, T wave inversion) were risk factors for development of angina pectoris and congestive heart failure. Heart enlargement on chest X-ray was also a risk factor for development of congestive heart failure, as were a high serum creatinine, body mass index, serum uric acid and proteinuria. Smoking was found to be a strong and independent risk factor for any one of these cardiovascular disorders. After 10 years about one fourth of all patients, still attending the clinic, had at least one cardiovascular complication. Hence, the risk of developing cardiovascular disorders is substantial and seems to be potentiated by the same risk factors known to operate in the general population.
PubMed ID
3565082 View in PubMed
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Area social characteristics and carotid atherosclerosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166391
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Aug;17(4):333-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2007
Author
M. Rosvall
G. Engström
B. Hedblad
L. Janzon
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. maria.rosvall@med.lu.se
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2007 Aug;17(4):333-9
Date
Aug-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular diseases
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - physiopathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
To explore the effect of social characteristics of residential areas on carotid atherosclerosis prevalence.
The associations among area social characteristics and B-mode ultrasound determined carotid plaque-score (a semi-quantitative scale measuring the degree of atherosclerosis in the carotid bifurcation area) were cross-sectionally investigated in a general population sample of 4033 men and women. Area socioeconomic circumstances were described through a social deprivation index calculated from migration rate, percentage residents with foreign citizenship among those with foreign background, dependency on social welfare support, and employment rate. Living in socially deprived areas was associated with an increased carotid plaque-score in both men (P for trend = 0.004) and women (P for trend = 0.007). These associations were only slightly reduced after adjustment for individual level indicators with a decrease of the absolute mean difference in carotid plaque-score between worse-off and better-off areas of 9% for men and 13% for women, whereas adjustment for risk factors turned the trend non-significant in women, however, not in men.
Those living in socially deprived areas in general had more extensive carotid atherosclerosis. However, in these areas there were a substantial number of individuals with low degrees of carotid atherosclerosis and vice versa. Thus, with regard to conceptual ideas of causal inference, the social characteristics of an area seem to be associated with the prevalence of carotid atherosclerosis. However, with regard to benefits of prevention, focusing on geographical areas would probably give a restricted benefit, where only some high-risk individuals would be reached.
PubMed ID
17121741 View in PubMed
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Association between Helicobacter pylori and gastric carcinoma in the city of Malmö, Sweden. A prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21840
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Dec;32(12):1215-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
J H Simán
A. Forsgren
G. Berglund
C H Florén
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 1997 Dec;32(12):1215-21
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Adult
Aged
Antibodies - blood
Case-Control Studies
Female
Helicobacter Infections - complications - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Stomach Neoplasms - complications - epidemiology - microbiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: We have investigated the association between Helicobacter pylori and gastric carcinoma through a nested case-control study in a single city. METHODS: From a cohort of 32,906 residents recruited from 1974 through 1992, 56 cases of gastric adenocarcinoma and 224 matched controls were selected. The mean interval between serum collection and diagnosis was 5.7 years. Frozen serum or plasma samples were analysed for IgG antibodies against H. pylori with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The overall seropositivity prevalence in gastric cancer cases was 82%, compared with 49% in controls, giving an odds ratio (OR) of 5.0 (95% confidence interval (CI), 2.2-11.5). Partial gastrectomy because of peptic ulcer 5 to 36 year before diagnosis of gastric cancer could be a confounding factor. With exclusion of 10 such cases, H. pylori seropositivity among cases was 78%, as compared with 50% in matched controls (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.7-9.2). Tumours of the cardia were not associated with H. pylori (OR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.23-3.7), which is in contrast to tumours of the fundus, corpus, and antrum, which were significantly associated (OR, 11.1; 95% CI, 2.4-71.8). This difference in location was significant (P
PubMed ID
9438319 View in PubMed
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The association between total energy intake and early mortality: data from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17355
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Dec;256(6):499-509
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
M. Leosdottir
P. Nilsson
J-A Nilsson
H. Månsson
G. Berglund
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Lund University, University Hospital (UMAS), S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. margret.leosdottir@medforsk.mas.lu.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2004 Dec;256(6):499-509
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: In animal studies, low energy intake (EI) has been associated with a longer lifespan. We examine whether EI is an independent risk factor for prospective all-cause mortality, cardiovascular and cancer mortality in humans. DESIGN: Population-based, prospective cohort study. SETTING AND SUBJECTS: The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study is a population-based prospective cohort study. A total of 28 098 individuals, mean age 58.2 years, completed questionnaires on diet and life-style and attended a physical examination during 1991-96. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Information on mortality was acquired from national registries during a mean follow-up time of 6.6 years. Subjects were categorized by quartiles of total EI. The first quartile was used as a reference point in estimating multivariate relative risks (RR; 95% CI, Cox's regression model). Adjustments were made for confounding by age and various life-style factors. RESULTS: The lowest total mortality was observed for women in the third quartile (RR: 0.74; CI: 0.57-0.96) and for men in the second and third quartiles (RR: 0.85; CI: 0.69-1.04 and RR: 0.85; CI: 0.69-1.04 respectively). Similar U-shaped patterns were observed for cardiovascular mortality amongst women and cancer mortality amongst men. A statistically significant trend (P = 0.029) towards lower cardiovascular mortality from the first to the fourth quartile was observed for men. CONCLUSIONS: Low caloric consumers did, on average, not have lower mortality than average or high caloric consumers. Generally, individuals approximately meeting national recommendations for total EI had the lowest mortality. For men, high caloric intake was associated with lower cardiovascular mortality.
PubMed ID
15554951 View in PubMed
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Association testing of common variants in the insulin receptor substrate-1 gene (IRS1) with type 2 diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164054
Source
Diabetologia. 2007 Jun;50(6):1209-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
J C Florez
M. Sjögren
C M Agapakis
N P Burtt
P. Almgren
U. Lindblad
G. Berglund
T. Tuomi
D. Gaudet
M J Daly
K G Ardlie
J N Hirschhorn
D. Altshuler
L. Groop
Author Affiliation
Simches Research Building-CPZN 6820, Diabetes Unit/Center for Human Genetic Research, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA 02114, USA. jcflorez@partners.org
Source
Diabetologia. 2007 Jun;50(6):1209-17
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - genetics
European Continental Ancestry Group - genetics
Female
Genetic Variation
Glucose Tolerance Test
Humans
Insulin - physiology
Insulin Receptor Substrate Proteins
Male
Middle Aged
Phosphoproteins - genetics
Poland - ethnology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Signal Transduction
Sweden - ethnology
United States
Abstract
Activation of the insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1) is a key initial step in the insulin signalling pathway. Despite several reports of association of the G972R polymorphism in its gene IRS1 with type 2 diabetes, we and others have not observed this association in well-powered samples. However, other nearby variants might account for the putative association signal.
We characterised the haplotype map of IRS1 and selected 20 markers designed to capture common variations in the region. We genotyped this comprehensive set of markers in several family-based and case-control samples of European descent totalling 12,129 subjects.
In an initial sample of 2,235 North American and Polish case-control pairs, the minor allele of the rs934167 polymorphism showed nominal evidence of association with type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.25, 95% CI 1.03-1.51, p = 0.03). This association showed a trend in the same direction in 7,659 Scandinavian samples (OR 1.16, 95% CI 0.96-1.39, p = 0.059). The combined OR was 1.20 (p = 0.008), but statistical correction for the number of variants examined yielded a p value of 0.086. We detected no differences across rs934167 genotypes in insulin-related quantitative traits.
Our data do not support an association of common variants in IRS1 with type 2 diabetes in populations of European descent.
PubMed ID
17443311 View in PubMed
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Birth weight is associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk in Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17444
Source
Br J Cancer. 2004 Nov 1;91(9):1666-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2004
Author
P H Lahmann
B. Gullberg
H. Olsson
H. Boeing
G. Berglund
L. Lissner
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Arthur-Scheunert-Allee 114-116, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany. lahmann@mail.dife.de
Source
Br J Cancer. 2004 Nov 1;91(9):1666-8
Date
Nov-1-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Birth weight
Breast Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Middle Aged
Postmenopause - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
There is some evidence that birth weight is associated with breast cancer. Whether this association differs between premenopausal and postmenopausal ages is still unclear. The results from this study suggest that higher birth weight is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer (OR 1.06, CI 1.00-1.12, per 100 g), independent of selected early-life and adult factors.
PubMed ID
15477861 View in PubMed
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Blood pressure development and characteristics of subjects with moderate blood pressure elevation. A two-year follow-up study in a random population sample.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56215
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1974 Oct;196(4):301-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1974

Breast cancer incidence in ex-smokers in relation to body mass index, weight gain and blood lipid levels.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19708
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2001 Jun;10(3):281-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
J. Manjer
J. Malina
G. Berglund
L. Bondeson
J P Garne
L. Janzon
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden. jonas.manjer@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Eur J Cancer Prev. 2001 Jun;10(3):281-7
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Breast Neoplasms - blood - epidemiology
Cholesterol - blood
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lipids - blood
Lipoproteins - blood
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Receptors, Estrogen - metabolism
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Smoking Cessation
Sweden - epidemiology
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
According to several studies breast cancer is more common among former smokers. This study explores whether this association has any relationship with anthropometric measurements or blood lipid levels. The 2082 ex-smokers (mean age 49.9 years) in the Malmö Preventive Cohort were followed for an average of 13.3 years using official cancer registries. This yielded 93 incident breast cancer cases. Oestrogen receptor (ER) status was assessed by an immunological method. Incidence of breast cancer covaried with height, body mass index, weight gain and cholesterol levels. None of these associations reached statistical significance. Incidence of breast cancer increased over quartiles of serum triglycerides, Ptrend: 0.02, relative risk (RR) for triglycerides as a continuous variable: 1.46 (1.21-1.77). Nineteen tumours were ER negative; this subgroup was similarly related to high triglycerides, 1.76 (1.40-2.21). All results were similar when BMI and cholesterol levels were entered into the model. It is concluded that breast cancer incidence covaries with triglyceride levels in ex-smokers.
PubMed ID
11432717 View in PubMed
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Breast cancer incidence in relation to smoking cessation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10401
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2000 May;61(2):121-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
J. Manjer
G. Berglund
L. Bondesson
J P Garne
L. Janzon
J. Malina
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Medicine, Lund University, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden. jonas.manjer@smi.mas.lu.se
Source
Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2000 May;61(2):121-9
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology
Carcinoma - epidemiology - pathology
Carcinoma in Situ - epidemiology - pathology
Cohort Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Contraceptives, Oral - adverse effects
Estrogens - metabolism
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Obesity - epidemiology
Postmenopause
Premenopause
Reproductive history
Risk
Smoking - epidemiology
Smoking Cessation
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
High plasma levels of oestrogens are associated with increased breast cancer risk. If smoking, as has been suggested, have both a tumour initiating mutagenic effect and a protective anti-oestrogenic effect, one would assume that smokers who give up smoking have the highest incidence of breast cancer. This was evaluated in the follow-up of a cohort of 10,902 women of whom 4,359 were premenopausal. Record-linkage with official cancer registries yielded 416 incident cases during an average follow-up of 13.6 years. The adjusted relative risk in all ex-smokers was 1.31 (1.02-1.69), as compared to never smokers, and in premenopausal ex-smokers it was 1.57 (1.07-2.30). Breast cancer incidence in premenopausal ex-smokers was inversely related to time since cessation, (p for trend = 0.01), and was highest among the women who had given-up smoking less than 12 months before screening: 2.76 (1.55-4.91). There was no significant association between current smoking and breast cancer risk. We conclude that incidence of breast cancer in premenopausal women who have given up smoking is higher than it is in smokers and never smokers. To what extent this may be related to endocrine effects associated with smoking cessation remains to be evaluated.
PubMed ID
10942097 View in PubMed
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103 records – page 1 of 11.