Skip header and navigation

Refine By

   MORE

4 records – page 1 of 1.

Change in psychotropic drug use in Norwegian nursing homes between 2004 and 2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297761
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 03; 30(3):385-394
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2018
Author
G Selbæk
S I M Janus
S Bergh
K Engedal
S Ruths
A S Helvik
J Šaltyte Benth
S U Zuidema
Author Affiliation
Norwegian National Advisory Unit on Ageing and Health,Vestfold Hospital Trust,Tønsberg,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 03; 30(3):385-394
Date
03-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Behavioral Symptoms - drug therapy - psychology
Cognition Disorders - drug therapy - psychology
Cohort Studies
Dementia - drug therapy - psychology
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Homes for the Aged
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Nursing Homes - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - drug therapy - epidemiology
Psychotropic Drugs - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
ABSTRACTBackground:We aimed to assess whether there were any changes in the use of psychotropic drugs in Norwegian nursing homes between 2004 and 2011. Also, we investigated whether the predictors of use of specific psychotropic drug groups have changed.
We conducted a secondary analysis of two cohort studies of two Norwegian nursing home samples (2004/05 and 2010/11). Multivariate models were applied.
We found a significant decrease in the prescription of antipsychotic drugs between 2004 and 2011 (0.63 OR, 95%CI = 0.49-0.82, p
PubMed ID
28988552 View in PubMed
Less detail

Frequency and subgroups of neuropsychiatric symptoms in mild cognitive impairment and different stages of dementia in Alzheimer's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296118
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 01; 30(1):103-113
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
01-2018
Author
N Siafarikas
G Selbaek
T Fladby
J Šaltyte Benth
E Auning
D Aarsland
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatric Psychiatry,Akershus University Hospital,Lørenskog,Norway.
Source
Int Psychogeriatr. 2018 01; 30(1):103-113
Date
01-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cognitive Dysfunction - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Norway - epidemiology
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS), such as depression, apathy, agitation, and psychotic symptoms are common in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Subgroups of NPS have been reported. Yet the relationship of NPS and their subgroups to different stages of cognitive impairment is unclear. Most previous studies are based on small sample sizes and show conflicting results. We sought to examine the frequency of NPS and their subgroups in MCI and different stages of dementia in AD.
This was a cross-sectional study using data from a Norwegian national registry of memory clinics. From a total sample of 4,571 patients, we included those with MCI or AD (MCI 817, mild AD 883, moderate-severe AD 441). To compare variables across groups ANOVA or ? 2-test was applied. We used factor analysis of Neuropsychiatric Inventory Questionnaire (NPI-Q) items to identify subgroups of NPS.
The frequency of any NPS was 87.2% (AD 91.2%, MCI 79.5%; p
PubMed ID
28927477 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of a stepwise protocol for treating pain on pain intensity in nursing home patients with dementia: a cluster randomized trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263876
Source
Eur J Pain. 2014 Nov;18(10):1490-500
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
R K Sandvik
G. Selbaek
R. Seifert
D. Aarsland
C. Ballard
A. Corbett
B S Husebo
Source
Eur J Pain. 2014 Nov;18(10):1490-500
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - therapeutic use
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Analgesics - therapeutic use
Buprenorphine - therapeutic use
Clinical Protocols
Dementia - complications
Female
Humans
Male
Morphine - therapeutic use
Norway
Nursing Homes
Pain - complications - drug therapy
Pain Management - methods
Pain Measurement
Transdermal Patch
Treatment Outcome
gamma-Aminobutyric Acid - analogs & derivatives - therapeutic use
Abstract
Pain is frequent and distressing in people with dementia, but no randomized controlled trials have evaluated the effect of analgesic treatment on pain intensity as a key outcome.
Three hundred fifty-two people with dementia and significant agitation from 60 nursing home units were included in this study. These units, representing 18 nursing homes in western Norway, were randomized to a stepwise protocol of treating pain (SPTP) or usual care. The SPTP group received acetaminophen, morphine, buprenorphine transdermal patch and pregabalin for 8 weeks, with a 4-week washout period. Medications were governed by the SPTP and each participant's existing prescriptions. We obtained pain intensity scores from 327 patients (intervention n = 164, control n = 163) at five time points assessed by the primary outcome measure, Mobilization-Observation-Behaviour-Intensity-Dementia-2 (MOBID-2) Pain Scale. The secondary outcome was activities of daily living (ADL). We used a linear intercept mixed model in a two-way repeated measures configuration to assess change over time and between groups.
The SPTP conferred significant benefit in MOBID-2 scores compared with the control group [average treatment effect (ATE) -1.388; p
Notes
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2009 Mar;23(1):180-919192240
Cites: Lancet Neurol. 2008 Sep;7(9):812-2618667359
Cites: Pain. 2010 Jan;148(1):70-419910119
Cites: Scand J Caring Sci. 2010 Jun;24(2):380-9120210897
Cites: Epidemiology. 2010 Sep;21(5):658-6820585256
Cites: Pain Pract. 2010 Sep-Oct;10(5):428-5020492579
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2010 Dec;58(12):2394-40021054329
Cites: J Clin Nurs. 2011 Jul;20(13-14):1849-5721592246
Cites: BMJ. 2011;343:d406521765198
Cites: Drugs Aging. 2012 May 1;29(5):359-7622550966
Cites: Nat Rev Neurol. 2012 May;8(5):264-7422487749
Cites: Drugs Aging. 2012 Sep;29(9):701-623018606
Cites: Maturitas. 2013 Feb;74(2):123-923201325
Cites: BMC Geriatr. 2013;13:1423399452
Cites: Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:1471-8224204133
Cites: Ageing Res Rev. 2013 Sep;12(4):1042-5523727161
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2009 Jan;17(1):65-7419092313
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Jul 19;372(9634):183-518640439
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2014 Jul;22(7):708-1723611363
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2009 Aug;57(8):1331-4619573219
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2014 Nov;18(10):1419-3024799157
Cites: Am J Med. 1999 Dec 13;107(6A):55S-61S; discussion 61S-64S10628594
Cites: Neurosci Lett. 2000 Feb 18;280(2):107-1010686389
Cites: J Gerontol A Biol Sci Med Sci. 2002 Apr;57(4):M236-4011909889
Cites: Psychiatry. 2003 Summer;66(2):133-4512868293
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2003 Aug;18(8):700-512891637
Cites: Pain. 2003 Sep;105(1-2):133-4114499429
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2004 May;27(5):1047-5315111519
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2004 Jul;52(7):1093-715209646
Cites: Int J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2004 Aug;19(8):741-815290697
Cites: Pain. 2004 Aug;110(3):628-3815288403
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: Am J Psychiatry. 1982 Sep;139(9):1136-97114305
Cites: J Gerontol. 1989 May;44(3):M77-842715584
Cites: Res Nurs Health. 1992 Oct;15(5):369-771529121
Cites: Md State Med J. 1965 Feb;14:61-514258950
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2005 Nov;53(11):1921-916274373
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2006 May;10(4):379-8416087372
Cites: Mol Pharmacol. 2006 Aug;70(2):467-7616641316
Cites: Am J Alzheimers Dis Other Demen. 2006 Jun-Jul;21(3):147-5516869334
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 Jul;34(1):67-8017509814
Cites: J Pain Symptom Manage. 2007 Nov;34(5):480-717616332
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2008 Jan 15;148(2):147-5918195339
Cites: Drug Saf. 2008;31(6):485-50318484783
Cites: Eur J Pain. 2008 Aug;12(6):705-1518162422
Cites: J Am Med Dir Assoc. 2008 Jul;9(6):427-3318585645
Comment In: Eur J Pain. 2014 Nov;18(10):1363-425303611
PubMed ID
24819710 View in PubMed
Less detail

The impact of dementia on the use of general practitioners among the elderly in Norway.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275243
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):199-205
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
A E Ydstebø
S. Bergh
G. Selbæk
J Šaltyte Benth
H. Lurås
C. Vossius
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2015;33(3):199-205
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Dementia - therapy
Female
General practice
General practitioners
Health services needs and demand
Health Services for the Aged - utilization
Home Care Services
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motivation
Norway
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Practice Patterns, Physicians'
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Abstract
To assess the use of general practitioners (GPs), in elderly home-dwelling persons in Norway and explore the impact of cognitive decline, age, and living situation.
Prospective longitudinal study.
Data were collected from municipalities in four counties in Norway in the period from January 2009 to August 2012.
Home-dwelling persons 70 years of age or older, receiving in-home care.
Use of GPs over a period of 18 months related to cognitive state, functional status, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and demographics.
A total of 599 persons were included. The mean annual number of consultations per participant was 5.6 (SD = 5.4). People with moderate to severe dementia had fewer consultations per year compared with those with mild or no dementia (3.7 versus 5.8 per year, p = 0.004). In the multivariate model higher age predicted fewer consultations while affective neuropsychiatric symptoms were associated with an increase in frequency of consultations. The most frequent reason to consult a GP was cardiovascular diseases (36.8% of all consultations), followed by musculoskeletal complaints (12.1%) and psychiatric diagnoses (8.7%).
Our study shows that the home-dwelling elderly with moderate to severe dementia in Norway consult their GP less often than persons with mild or no dementia. This could indicate a need for better interaction between the municipal care and social services and the general practitioners.
Notes
Cites: Health Trends. 1993-1994;25(4):142-610133877
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1993 Oct;41(10):1065-708409151
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 1999 Apr;47(4):487-9110203127
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2006;22(2):132-4116741361
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Aug 10;126(15):1917-2016915314
Cites: Dement Geriatr Cogn Disord. 2007;24(6):457-6317986816
Cites: Arch Neurol. 2008 Aug;65(8):1091-518695059
Cites: Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2008 Nov;16(11):893-90418978250
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2008;26(4):235-4018788054
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2010 Sep;60(578):671-420849694
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 2011 Sep;29(3):181-621740344
Cites: Br J Gen Pract. 2012 Feb;62(595):e91-822520775
Cites: Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2012 Aug;26(4):272-8422835747
Cites: Clin Interv Aging. 2013;8:329-3923682212
Cites: Int Psychogeriatr. 2014 Mar;26(3):383-9124252377
Cites: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2014 Feb 11;134(3):276-724518472
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2014 Apr;33(4):587-9524711319
Cites: Health Aff (Millwood). 2014 Apr;33(4):596-60424711320
Cites: J Am Geriatr Soc. 2002 Nov;50(11):1852-612410906
Cites: Age Ageing. 2002 Nov;31(6):445-5012446290
Cites: J Intern Med. 2004 Sep;256(3):240-615324367
Cites: Gerontologist. 1969 Autumn;9(3):179-865349366
Cites: J Psychiatr Res. 1975 Nov;12(3):189-981202204
Cites: Psychopharmacol Bull. 1988;24(4):637-93249765
Cites: Neurology. 1994 Dec;44(12):2308-147991117
PubMed ID
26294095 View in PubMed
Less detail