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Autoimmunity to ryanodine receptor and titin in myasthenia gravis is associated with GM allotypes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature22257
Source
Autoimmunity. 1997;26(2):111-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
G O Skeie
J P Pandey
J A Aarli
N E Gilhus
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
Autoimmunity. 1997;26(2):111-6
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Autoantibodies - blood
Blotting, Western
Calmodulin-Binding Proteins - analysis - immunology
Carrier Proteins - analysis - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Germany
Haplotypes
Hemagglutination Tests
Humans
Immunoglobulin Gm Allotypes - blood - classification
Male
Membrane Proteins - analysis - immunology
Middle Aged
Muscle Proteins - analysis - immunology
Myasthenia Gravis - immunology
Norway
Phenotype
Protein Kinases - analysis - immunology
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel - analysis - immunology
Thymoma - immunology
Thymus Neoplasms - immunology
Abstract
Myasthenia gravis (MG) is mediated by autoantibodies against the acetylcholine receptor at the muscle endplate. Some MG patients have in addition antibodies (Ab) to the skeletal muscle proteins ryanodine receptor (RyR) and titin. We have examined GM and KM allotypes, RyR and titin Ab in 44 MG patients (37 thymoma patients and 7 non-thymoma, late-onset patients) and 292 non-MG controls to see if GM/KM allotypes associate with differences in autoantibody production. All patients had titin Ab, and 15 thymoma patients had also RyR Ab. The phenotype GM 1, 2, 3 23 5, 21 was significantly increased in the patients with titin Ab compared with the non-MG controls (chi2 = 4.93, p
PubMed ID
9546812 View in PubMed
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Differential effect of environmental risk factors on postural instability gait difficulties and tremor dominant Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96243
Source
Mov Disord. 2010 Jul 28;
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-28-2010
Author
G O Skeie
B. Muller
K. Haugarvoll
J P Larsen
O B Tysnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.
Source
Mov Disord. 2010 Jul 28;
Date
Jul-28-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Both environmental and genetic factors contribute to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). We have examined environmental risk factors in a Norwegian population of incident PD patients and controls, the Norwegian ParkWest study. All five neurological wards in the study area of Western Norway participated in the study. A 4-step diagnostic procedure was used to establish a representative cohort of patients with incident PD at a high level of diagnostic accuracy. 212 incident PD patients and 175 age- and gender-matched controls were included. PD patients and controls were asked for information on occupation, education, exposure to pesticides, tobacco, alcohol, and caffeine. Agricultural work was associated with a higher risk of PD (OR 1.75 (1.03-3.0) P = 0.009). There were no differences as to other occupations. Smoking (OR 0.63 (0.42-0.95) P = 0.016) and alcohol use (OR 0.55 P = 0.008) were associated with a lower risk for PD. Interestingly, this inverse association was only seen in postural instability gait difficulties (PIGD) PD (P = 0.046 for smoking, P = 0.07 for alcohol consumption), and not in tremor dominant (TD) PD which was similar to controls. Consumption of coffee was lower in PD patients (3.3 +/- 1.8 cups per day vs. 3.8 +/- 2.0 in controls P = 0.02). In the regression model including intake of alcohol, coffee, and smoke, only coffee (P = 0.007) and alcohol intake (P = 0.021) remained significant whereas smoking was no longer significant. Thus, it seems as though only coffee intake reduces the risk of PD in general while associations to alcohol and smoking differ between PIGD and TD-PD patients. (c) 2010 Movement Disorder Society.
PubMed ID
20669310 View in PubMed
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Gamma knife surgery of meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus: long-term follow-up of 100 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97633
Source
Neurosurgery. 2010 Apr;66(4):661-8; discussion 668-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Bente Sandvei Skeie
P O Enger
G O Skeie
F. Thorsen
P-H Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurosurgery, Haukeland University Hospital, N-5021 Bergen, Norway. bsai@helse-bergen.no
Source
Neurosurgery. 2010 Apr;66(4):661-8; discussion 668-9
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cavernous Sinus - surgery
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Meningeal Neoplasms - pathology - surgery
Meningioma - pathology - surgery
Middle Aged
Radiosurgery - methods
Retrospective Studies
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Resection of meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus often is incomplete and associated with considerable morbidity. As a result, an increasing number of patients with such tumors have been treated with gamma knife surgery (GKS). However, few studies have investigated the long-term outcome for this group of patients. METHODS: 100 patients (23 male/77 female) with meningiomas involving the cavernous sinus received GKS at the Department of Neurosurgery at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, between November 1988 and July 2006. They were followed for a mean of 82.0 (range, 0-243) months. Only 2 patients were lost to long-term follow-up. Sixty patients underwent craniotomy before radiosurgery, whereas radiosurgery was the primary treatment for 40 patients. RESULTS: Tumor growth control was achieved in 84.0% of patients. Twelve patients required re-treatment: craniotomy (7), radiosurgery (1), or both (4). Three out of 5 patients with repeated radiosurgery demonstrated secondary tumor growth control. Excluding atypical meningiomas, the growth control rate was 90.4%. The 1-, 5-, and 10-year actuarial tumor growth control rates are 98.9%, 94.2%, and 91.6%, respectively. Treatment failure was preceded by clinical symptoms in 14 of 15 patients. Most tumor growths appeared within 2.5 years. Only one third grew later (range, 6-20 yr). The complication rate was 6.0%: optic neuropathy (2), pituitary dysfunction (3), worsening of diplopia (1), and radiation edema (1). Mortality was 0. At last follow-up, 88.0% were able to live independent lives. CONCLUSION: GKS gives long-term growth control and has a low complication rate. Most tumor growths manifest within 3 years following treatment. However, some appear late, emphasizing the need for long-term follow-up.
PubMed ID
20305491 View in PubMed
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Parkinson disease: associated disorders in the Norwegian population based incident ParkWest study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122163
Source
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2013 Jan;19(1):53-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
G O Skeie
B. Muller
K. Haugarvoll
J P Larsen
O B Tysnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway. geir.olve.skeie@helse-bergen.no
Source
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2013 Jan;19(1):53-5
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anxiety Disorders - complications - diagnosis
Cohort Studies
Depression - complications - diagnosis
Diabetes Complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Parkinson Disease - complications - diagnosis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - complications - diagnosis
Abstract
Parkinson's disease (PD) may be associated with a number of different diseases due to common risk factors or overlapping symptomatology. We have asked for possible associated disorders in a Norwegian population of incident PD patients and controls, the Norwegian ParkWest study. The patients were diagnosed according to the Gelb criteria. 212 incident PD patients and 175 age and gender matched controls were included. PD patients and controls were asked for information on earlier medical history and family history. PD patients had a higher frequency of self-reported symptoms of depression (p = 0.003) and anxiety disorders (p = 0.004) before baseline. They tended to have a higher frequency of diabetes (p = 0.09) and had a higher frequency of prior stroke or TIA (p = 0.004).
PubMed ID
22841686 View in PubMed
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Treatment in early Parkinson's disease: the Norwegian ParkWest study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118588
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2013 Aug;128(2):107-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
O V Tveiten
G O Skeie
K. Haugarvoll
B. Müller
J P Larsen
O B Tysnes
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. oystein.tveiten@helse-bergen.no
Source
Acta Neurol Scand. 2013 Aug;128(2):107-13
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Aged
Antiparkinson Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Dopamine Agents - therapeutic use
Female
Humans
Levodopa - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Neurologic Examination
Norway
Parkinson Disease - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
There are limited data on treatment effect in early and drug-na?ve Parkinson's disease (PD) outside of clinical trials. We sought to review the treatment effects on motor symptoms in early, unselected PD patients.
We included 183 drug-na?ve patients from a longitudinal cohort (The Norwegian ParkWest study). At the time of diagnosis, motor symptoms were assessed and rated. Treatment was unrestricted, aimed at treating each patient optimally. Patients were reassessed after 12 months, and then grouped according to treatment: No dopaminergic treatment (NDT), dopamine agonists (DA) or levodopa. All strategies could be combined with monoamine oxidase B inhibitors.
In general, the chosen treatment was coherent with current practice. During follow-up, patients given NDT (n = 40) had unaltered clinical motor symptoms, as opposed to improvement in the DA- and levodopa-treated patients (n = 140). The overall improvement in these two groups was fairly similar, but axial symptoms did not improve in levodopa-treated patients as opposed to the younger DA-treated patients.
Twelve months after the diagnosis, motor symptoms in approximately one-fifth of PD patients remained clinically stable. Tremor, bradykinesia and rigidity improved in the dopaminergic-treated patients. Axial symptoms were more treatment resistant, and the different symptomatic effects found between treatment strategies may be age related.
PubMed ID
23190324 View in PubMed
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