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Global warming and effects on the Arctic fox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95506
Source
Sci Prog. 2008;91(Pt 2):175-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Fuglei Eva
Ims Rolf Anker
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Polar Institute, N-9296 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Sci Prog. 2008;91(Pt 2):175-91
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Arctic Regions
Ecosystem
Feeding Behavior
Foxes - physiology
Greenhouse Effect
Population Dynamics
Abstract
We predict the effect of global warming on the arctic fox, the only endemic terrestrial predatory mammals in the arctic region. We emphasize the difference between coastal and inland arctic fox populations. Inland foxes rely on peak abundance of lemming prey to sustain viable populations. In the short-term, warmer winters result in missed lemming peak years and reduced opportunities for successful arctic fox breeding. In the long-term, however, warmer climate will increase plant productivity and more herbivore prey for competitive dominant predators moving in from the south. The red fox has already intruded the arctic region and caused a retreat of the southern limit of arctic fox distribution range. Coastal arctic foxes, which rely on the richer and temporally stable marine subsidies, will be less prone to climate-induced resource limitations. Indeed, arctic islands, becoming protected from southern species invasions as the extent of sea ice is decreasing, may become the last refuges for coastal populations of Arctic foxes.
PubMed ID
18717368 View in PubMed
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Organochlorine-induced histopathology in kidney and liver tissue from Arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93600
Source
Chemosphere. 2008 Apr;71(7):1214-24
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Sonne Christian
Wolkers Hans
Leifsson Pall S
Jenssen Bjørn Munro
Fuglei Eva
Ahlstrøm Oystein
Dietz Rune
Kirkegaard Maja
Muir Derek C G
Jørgensen Even
Author Affiliation
Section for Contaminants, Effects and Marine Mammals, Department of Arctic Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, University of Aarhus, Frederiksborgvej 399, PO Box 358, DK-4000 Roskilde, Denmark. csh@dmu.dk
Source
Chemosphere. 2008 Apr;71(7):1214-24
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Feed
Animals
Arctic Regions
Energy intake
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Food chain
Foxes - growth & development - metabolism
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated - toxicity
Kidney - drug effects - pathology
Kidney Diseases - chemically induced - pathology
Liver - drug effects - pathology
Liver Diseases - chemically induced - pathology
Pesticides - toxicity
Polychlorinated Biphenyls - toxicity
Abstract
The effects of persistent organic pollutants on renal and liver morphology in farmed arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) were studied under experimental conditions. Control animals received a diet containing pork (Sus scrofa) fat with low amounts of persistent organic pollutants, while the diet of the exposed animals contained whale blubber, 'naturally' contaminated with persistent organic pollutants. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) and organochlorine pesticide (OCP) concentrations in the whale blubber were 488 and 395 ng/g wet weight, respectively. Animals were sacrificed and sampled when they were at their fattest (winter) as well as their lowest body weight (summer). The results show that PCB and OCP exposure causes renal (and probably also liver) lesions in arctic foxes. The prevalence of glomerular, tubular and interstitial lesions was significantly highest in the exposed group (chi-square: all p0.05). The prevalence of lesions was not significantly different between lean (winter) and fat (summer) foxes for any of the lesions (chi-square: all p>0.05). We suggest that wild arctic foxes exposed to an environmental cocktail of persistent organic pollutants, such as PCBs and OCPs, in their natural diet are at risk for developing chronic kidney and liver damage. Whether such lesions may have an impact on age and health of the animals remains uncertain.
PubMed ID
18279914 View in PubMed
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Serosurvey for Toxoplasma gondii in arctic foxes and possible sources of infection in the high Arctic of Svalbard.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84091
Source
Vet Parasitol. 2007 Nov 30;150(1-2):6-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-30-2007
Author
Prestrud Kristin Wear
Asbakk Kjetil
Fuglei Eva
Mørk Torill
Stien Audun
Ropstad Erik
Tryland Morten
Gabrielsen Geir Wing
Lydersen Christian
Kovacs Kit M
Loonen Maarten J J E
Sagerup Kjetil
Oksanen Antti
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Veterinary Science (NVH), Section of Arctic Veterinary Medicine, P.O. Box 6204, N-9292 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Vet Parasitol. 2007 Nov 30;150(1-2):6-12
Date
Nov-30-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Samples (blood or tissue fluid) from 594 arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus), 390 Svalbard reindeer (Rangifer tarandus platyrhynchus), 361 sibling voles (Microtus rossiaemeridionalis), 17 walruses (Odobenus rosmarus), 149 barnacle geese (Branta leucopsis), 58 kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), and 27 glaucous gulls (Larus hyperboreus) from Svalbard and nearby waters were assayed for antibodies against Toxoplasma gondii using a direct agglutination test. The proportion of seropositive animals was 43% in arctic foxes, 7% in barnacle geese, and 6% (1 of 17) in walruses. There were no seropositive Svalbard reindeer, sibling voles, glaucous gulls, or kittiwakes. The prevalence in the arctic fox was relatively high compared to previous reports from canid populations. There are no wild felids in Svalbard and domestic cats are prohibited, and the absence of antibodies against T. gondii among the herbivorous Svalbard reindeer and voles indicates that transmission of the parasite by oocysts is not likely to be an important mechanism in the Svalbard ecosystem. Our results suggest that migratory birds, such as the barnacle goose, may be the most important vectors bringing the parasite to Svalbard. In addition to transmission through infected prey and carrion, the age-seroprevalence profile in the fox population suggests that their infection levels are enhanced by vertical transmission.
PubMed ID
17950534 View in PubMed
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