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Meal box schemes a convenient way to avoid convenience food? Uses and understandings of meal box schemes among Danish consumers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290430
Source
Appetite. 2017 Jul 01; 114:232-239
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Jul-01-2017
Author
Frej Daniel Hertz
Bente Halkier
Author Affiliation
Department of Communication and Arts (DCA), Roskilde University, Office Location: 40.03.06, Aboretvej 1, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark. Electronic address: fdhertz@ruc.dk.
Source
Appetite. 2017 Jul 01; 114:232-239
Date
Jul-01-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Consumer Behavior - economics
Cooking - economics
Denmark
Family
Fast Foods - adverse effects - economics
Feeding Behavior
Feeding Methods - economics
Female
Focus Groups
Food Preferences
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Healthy Diet - economics
Humans
Male
Meals
Patient compliance
Qualitative Research
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
The term convenience food is subject to diversification, lack of clarity and moral ambiguity. In this paper we address these issues and critically discuss convenience food by using empirical findings from a Danish study that deals with practitioners' uses of meal box schemes. The methodological design consists of thirteen individual interviews, four focus groups and some observations of cooking practices. We combine the empirical findings with a particular definition of convenience food by Brunner et al. (2010) and selected practice theoretical concepts. This particular combination enables us to categorize meal box schemes as a new form of convenience food called convenient food. In addition, results suggest that meal box schemes reduce leftovers from dinner. Meal boxes also influence dinner related activities such as planning ahead in time and grocery shopping, which require less physical and mental effort.
PubMed ID
28315421 View in PubMed
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