Skip header and navigation

Refine By

10 records – page 1 of 1.

Economic burden of COPD in a Swedish cohort: the ARCTIC study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295005
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2018; 13:275-285
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
2018
Author
Karin Lisspers
Kjell Larsson
Gunnar Johansson
Christer Janson
Madlaina Costa-Scharplatz
Jean-Bernard Gruenberger
Milica Uhde
Leif Jorgensen
Florian S Gutzwiller
Björn Ställberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2018; 13:275-285
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Absenteeism
Age Factors
Aged
Cost of Illness
Female
Health Care Costs - trends
Health Expenditures - trends
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Economic
Primary Health Care - economics - trends
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - economics - epidemiology - therapy
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Sick Leave - economics
Sweden
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We assessed direct and indirect costs associated with COPD in Sweden and examined how these costs vary across time, age, and disease stage in a cohort of patients with COPD and matched controls in a real-world, primary care (PC) setting.
Data from electronic medical records linked to the mandatory national health registers were collected for COPD patients and a matched reference population in 52 PC centers from 2000 to 2014. Direct health care costs (drug, outpatient or inpatient, PC, both COPD related and not COPD related) and indirect health care costs (loss of income, absenteeism, loss of productivity) were assessed.
A total of 17,479 patients with COPD and 84,514 reference controls were analyzed. During 2013, direct costs were considerably higher among the COPD patient population (€13,179) versus the reference population (€2,716), largely due to hospital nights unrelated to COPD. Direct costs increased with increasing disease severity and increasing age and were driven by higher respiratory drug costs and non-COPD-related hospital nights. Indirect costs (~€28,000 per patient) were the largest economic burden in COPD patients of working age during 2013.
As non-COPD-related hospital nights represent the largest direct cost, management of comorbidities in COPD would offer clinical benefits and relieve the financial burden of disease.
Notes
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2014 Mar 19;9:289-300 PMID 24672234
Cites: Respir Med. 2016 Feb;111:39-46 PMID 26725462
Cites: Popul Health Manag. 2012 Oct;15(5):267-75 PMID 22401150
Cites: COPD. 2015 Aug;12(4):381-9 PMID 25415366
Cites: Respir Med. 2007 Mar;101(3):539-46 PMID 16889949
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2017 Feb 23;12 :735-744 PMID 28260880
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2008 Dec;32(6):1433-42 PMID 19043008
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2008 Oct;50(10):1130-8 PMID 18849758
Cites: Respir Med. 2002 Sep;96(9):700-8 PMID 12243316
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Apr 19;11(4):e0152618 PMID 27092775
Cites: Respir Med. 2010 Mar;104(3):404-11 PMID 19963361
Cites: Respir Med. 2014 Sep;108(9):1345-54 PMID 25002194
Cites: Prim Care Respir J. 2010 Jun;19 Suppl 1:S1-20 PMID 20514388
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Apr 13;10(4):e0123292 PMID 25875204
Cites: J Glob Health. 2015 Dec;5(2):020415 PMID 26755942
Cites: Respir Med. 2003 Mar;97 Suppl C:S81-9 PMID 12647946
Cites: Eur Respir Rev. 2014 Sep;23(133):345-9 PMID 25176970
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2006 Jan;27(1):188-207 PMID 16387952
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2010 May 06;5:125-32 PMID 20461144
Cites: Dan Med J. 2013 Jan;60(1):A4557 PMID 23340185
Cites: Prim Care Respir J. 2014 Mar;23(1):38-45 PMID 24346825
Cites: BMJ Open. 2014 Jan 06;4(1):e004069 PMID 24394800
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2014 Oct 14;9:1145-54 PMID 25342899
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Sep 25;160(17):2653-8 PMID 10999980
Cites: Respir Med. 2012 Apr;106(4):540-8 PMID 22100535
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):532-55 PMID 17507545
Cites: Clin Med Insights Circ Respir Pulm Med. 2015 Mar 12;9:5-21 PMID 25788838
Cites: Respir Med. 2013 Dec;107(12):1931-8 PMID 23910072
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2008 Oct;32(4):962-9 PMID 18579551
Cites: Prim Care Respir J. 2013 Dec;22(4):393-9 PMID 24114334
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Dec 03;10:2609-18 PMID 26664109
Cites: COPD. 2005 Sep;2(3):311-8 PMID 17146996
Cites: Respir Med. 2010 May;104(5):697-704 PMID 19954941
Cites: Respir Med. 2008 Sep;102(9):1248-56 PMID 18620852
PubMed ID
29391785 View in PubMed
Less detail

Economic burden of COPD in a Swedish cohort: the ARCTIC study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289388
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2018; 13:275-285
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2018
Author
Karin Lisspers
Kjell Larsson
Gunnar Johansson
Christer Janson
Madlaina Costa-Scharplatz
Jean-Bernard Gruenberger
Milica Uhde
Leif Jorgensen
Florian S Gutzwiller
Björn Ställberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala.
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2018; 13:275-285
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
We assessed direct and indirect costs associated with COPD in Sweden and examined how these costs vary across time, age, and disease stage in a cohort of patients with COPD and matched controls in a real-world, primary care (PC) setting.
Data from electronic medical records linked to the mandatory national health registers were collected for COPD patients and a matched reference population in 52 PC centers from 2000 to 2014. Direct health care costs (drug, outpatient or inpatient, PC, both COPD related and not COPD related) and indirect health care costs (loss of income, absenteeism, loss of productivity) were assessed.
A total of 17,479 patients with COPD and 84,514 reference controls were analyzed. During 2013, direct costs were considerably higher among the COPD patient population (€13,179) versus the reference population (€2,716), largely due to hospital nights unrelated to COPD. Direct costs increased with increasing disease severity and increasing age and were driven by higher respiratory drug costs and non-COPD-related hospital nights. Indirect costs (~€28,000 per patient) were the largest economic burden in COPD patients of working age during 2013.
As non-COPD-related hospital nights represent the largest direct cost, management of comorbidities in COPD would offer clinical benefits and relieve the financial burden of disease.
Notes
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2014 Mar 19;9:289-300 PMID 24672234
Cites: Respir Med. 2016 Feb;111:39-46 PMID 26725462
Cites: Popul Health Manag. 2012 Oct;15(5):267-75 PMID 22401150
Cites: COPD. 2015 Aug;12(4):381-9 PMID 25415366
Cites: Respir Med. 2007 Mar;101(3):539-46 PMID 16889949
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2017 Feb 23;12 :735-744 PMID 28260880
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2008 Dec;32(6):1433-42 PMID 19043008
Cites: J Occup Environ Med. 2008 Oct;50(10):1130-8 PMID 18849758
Cites: Respir Med. 2002 Sep;96(9):700-8 PMID 12243316
Cites: PLoS One. 2016 Apr 19;11(4):e0152618 PMID 27092775
Cites: Respir Med. 2010 Mar;104(3):404-11 PMID 19963361
Cites: Respir Med. 2014 Sep;108(9):1345-54 PMID 25002194
Cites: Prim Care Respir J. 2010 Jun;19 Suppl 1:S1-20 PMID 20514388
Cites: PLoS One. 2015 Apr 13;10(4):e0123292 PMID 25875204
Cites: J Glob Health. 2015 Dec;5(2):020415 PMID 26755942
Cites: Respir Med. 2003 Mar;97 Suppl C:S81-9 PMID 12647946
Cites: Eur Respir Rev. 2014 Sep;23(133):345-9 PMID 25176970
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2006 Jan;27(1):188-207 PMID 16387952
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2010 May 06;5:125-32 PMID 20461144
Cites: Dan Med J. 2013 Jan;60(1):A4557 PMID 23340185
Cites: Prim Care Respir J. 2014 Mar;23(1):38-45 PMID 24346825
Cites: BMJ Open. 2014 Jan 06;4(1):e004069 PMID 24394800
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2014 Oct 14;9:1145-54 PMID 25342899
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2000 Sep 25;160(17):2653-8 PMID 10999980
Cites: Respir Med. 2012 Apr;106(4):540-8 PMID 22100535
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Sep 15;176(6):532-55 PMID 17507545
Cites: Clin Med Insights Circ Respir Pulm Med. 2015 Mar 12;9:5-21 PMID 25788838
Cites: Respir Med. 2013 Dec;107(12):1931-8 PMID 23910072
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2008 Oct;32(4):962-9 PMID 18579551
Cites: Prim Care Respir J. 2013 Dec;22(4):393-9 PMID 24114334
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Dec 03;10:2609-18 PMID 26664109
Cites: COPD. 2005 Sep;2(3):311-8 PMID 17146996
Cites: Respir Med. 2010 May;104(5):697-704 PMID 19954941
Cites: Respir Med. 2008 Sep;102(9):1248-56 PMID 18620852
PubMed ID
29391785 View in PubMed
Less detail

Gender differences among Swedish COPD patients: results from the ARCTIC, a real-world retrospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307773
Source
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med. 2019 12 10; 29(1):45
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
12-10-2019
Author
Karin Lisspers
Kjell Larsson
Christer Janson
Björn Ställberg
Ioanna Tsiligianni
Florian S Gutzwiller
Karen Mezzi
Bine Kjoeller Bjerregaard
Leif Jorgensen
Gunnar Johansson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. karin.lisspers@ltdalarna.se.
Source
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med. 2019 12 10; 29(1):45
Date
12-10-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Aged
Drug Administration Routes
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Glucocorticoids - administration & dosage
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - drug therapy - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sex Distribution
Sex Factors
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The present study aimed to generate real-world evidence regarding gender differences among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, especially as regards the diagnosis and outcomes in order to identify areas for improvement and management and optimize the associated healthcare resource allocation. ARCTIC is a large, real-world, retrospective cohort study conducted in Swedish COPD patients and a matched reference population from 52 primary care centers in 2000-2014. The incidence of COPD, prevalence of asthma and other comorbidities, risk of exacerbations, mortality rate, COPD drug prescriptions, and healthcare resource utilization were analyzed. In total, 17,479 patients with COPD were included in the study. During the study period, COPD was more frequent among women (53.8%) and women with COPD experienced more exacerbations vs. men (6.66 vs. 4.66). However, the overall mortality rate was higher in men compared with women (45% vs. 38%), but no difference for mortality due to COPD was seen between genders over the study period. Women seemed to have a greater susceptibility to asthma, fractures, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, rhinitis, depression, and anxiety, but appeared less likely to have diabetes, kidney diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Furthermore, women had a greater risk of COPD-related hospitalization and were likely to receive a significantly higher number of COPD drug prescriptions compared with men. These results support the need to reduce disease burden among women with COPD and highlight the role of healthcare professionals in primary care who should consider all these parameters in order to properly diagnose and treat women with COPD.
PubMed ID
31822681 View in PubMed
Less detail

 Identifying the associated risks of pneumonia in COPD patients: ARCTIC an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297708
Source
Respir Res. 2018 Sep 10; 19(1):172
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Date
Sep-10-2018
Author
Christer Janson
Gunnar Johansson
Björn Ställberg
Karin Lisspers
Petter Olsson
Dorothy L Keininger
Milica Uhde
Florian S Gutzwiller
Leif Jörgensen
Kjell Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, 75185, Uppsala, Sweden. christer.janson@medsci.uu.se.
Source
Respir Res. 2018 Sep 10; 19(1):172
Date
Sep-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Observational Study
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Electronic Health Records - trends
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Primary Health Care - trends
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Other factors such as severity of airflow limitation and concurrent asthma may further raise the possibility of developing pneumonia. This study assessed the risk of pneumonia associated with ICS in patients with COPD.
Electronic Medical Record data linked to National Health Registries were collected from COPD patients and matched reference controls in 52 Swedish primary care centers (2000-2014). Levels of ICS treatment (high, low, no ICS) and associated comorbidities were assessed. Patients were categorized by airflow limitation severity.
A total of 6623 patients with COPD and 48,566 controls were analyzed. Patients with COPD had a more than 4-fold increase in pneumonia versus reference controls (hazard ratio [HR] 4.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.48-5.06). ICS use increased the risk of pneumonia by 20-30% in patients with COPD with forced expiratory volume in 1 s?=?50% versus patients not using ICS. Asthma was an independent risk factor for pneumonia in the COPD population. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of pneumonia in the overall population. The highest risk of pneumonia was associated with high dose ICS (HR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.23-1.62).
Patients with COPD have a greater risk of pneumonia versus reference controls; ICS use and concurrent asthma increased the risk of pneumonia further.
PubMed ID
30200965 View in PubMed
Less detail

 Identifying the associated risks of pneumonia in COPD patients: ARCTIC an observational study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294874
Source
Respir Res. 2018 Sep 10; 19(1):172
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-10-2018
Author
Christer Janson
Gunnar Johansson
Björn Ställberg
Karin Lisspers
Petter Olsson
Dorothy L Keininger
Milica Uhde
Florian S Gutzwiller
Leif Jörgensen
Kjell Larsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences: Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Uppsala University, Akademiska sjukhuset, 75185, Uppsala, Sweden. christer.janson@medsci.uu.se.
Source
Respir Res. 2018 Sep 10; 19(1):172
Date
Sep-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are associated with an increased risk of pneumonia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Other factors such as severity of airflow limitation and concurrent asthma may further raise the possibility of developing pneumonia. This study assessed the risk of pneumonia associated with ICS in patients with COPD.
Electronic Medical Record data linked to National Health Registries were collected from COPD patients and matched reference controls in 52 Swedish primary care centers (2000-2014). Levels of ICS treatment (high, low, no ICS) and associated comorbidities were assessed. Patients were categorized by airflow limitation severity.
A total of 6623 patients with COPD and 48,566 controls were analyzed. Patients with COPD had a more than 4-fold increase in pneumonia versus reference controls (hazard ratio [HR] 4.76, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.48-5.06). ICS use increased the risk of pneumonia by 20-30% in patients with COPD with forced expiratory volume in 1 s?=?50% versus patients not using ICS. Asthma was an independent risk factor for pneumonia in the COPD population. Multivariate analysis identified independent predictors of pneumonia in the overall population. The highest risk of pneumonia was associated with high dose ICS (HR 1.41, 95% CI: 1.23-1.62).
Patients with COPD have a greater risk of pneumonia versus reference controls; ICS use and concurrent asthma increased the risk of pneumonia further.
Notes
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2014 Aug;44(2):341-50 PMID 24876173
Cites: Drugs. 2009;69(5):549-65 PMID 19368417
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2009 Feb 9;169(3):219-29 PMID 19204211
Cites: Respir Res. 2009 Jun 30;10:59 PMID 19566934
Cites: Lancet Respir Med. 2013 May;1(3):210-23 PMID 24429127
Cites: Ther Adv Respir Dis. 2013 Jun;7(3):139-50 PMID 23653458
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 Oct 23;8(10):e75221 PMID 24194824
Cites: Chest. 2011 Mar;139(3):505-512 PMID 20576732
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Jun 05;10:1015-26 PMID 26082625
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2016 Jun 9;374(23):2222-34 PMID 27181606
Cites: BMC Med. 2011 Jan 18;9:7 PMID 21244657
Cites: Scand J Prim Health Care. 1988 May;6(2):111-7 PMID 3387706
Cites: COPD. 2016 Jun;13(3):312-26 PMID 26645797
Cites: Chest. 2005 Oct;128(4):2099-107 PMID 16236861
Cites: Respir Med. 2010 Feb;104(2):246-52 PMID 19879745
Cites: Thorax. 2013 Nov;68(11):1029-36 PMID 24130228
Cites: Prim Care Respir J. 2014 Mar;23(1):38-45 PMID 24346825
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2015 Sep;46(3):671-9 PMID 26113674
Cites: COPD. 2009 Oct;6(5):320-9 PMID 19863361
Cites: Lancet Respir Med. 2013 Mar;1(1):51-60 PMID 24321804
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2009 Sep;34(3):641-7 PMID 19443528
Cites: Respir Med. 2012 Feb;106(2):257-68 PMID 22033040
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2009 Oct 15;180(8):741-50 PMID 19644045
Cites: BMJ. 2013 May 29;346:f3306 PMID 23719639
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2012;7:833-42 PMID 23277739
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2008 Oct;32(4):962-9 PMID 18579551
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Feb 22;356(8):775-89 PMID 17314337
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2017 Aug 21;12:2477-2485 PMID 28860742
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2008 Jan 1;177(1):19-26 PMID 17916806
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2010 May;35(5):1113-7 PMID 20436174
Cites: Respir Med. 2008 Aug;102(8):1099-108 PMID 18614347
PubMed ID
30200965 View in PubMed
Less detail

Impact of COPD diagnosis timing on clinical and economic outcomes: the ARCTIC observational cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300866
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2019; 14:995-1008
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2019
Author
Kjell Larsson
Christer Janson
Björn Ställberg
Karin Lisspers
Petter Olsson
Konstantinos Kostikas
Jean-Bernard Gruenberger
Florian S Gutzwiller
Milica Uhde
Leif Jorgensen
Gunnar Johansson
Author Affiliation
Work Environment Toxicology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2019; 14:995-1008
Date
2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
Purpose: Assess the clinical and economic consequences associated with an early versus late diagnosis in patients with COPD. Patients and methods: In a retrospective, observational cohort study, electronic medical record data (2000-2014) were collected from Swedish primary care patients with COPD. COPD indicators (pneumonia, other respiratory diseases, oral corticosteroids, antibiotics for respiratory infections, prescribed drugs for respiratory symptoms, lung function measurement) registered prior to diagnosis were applied to categorize patients into those receiving early (2 or less indicators) or late diagnosis (3 or more indicators registered >90 days preceding a COPD diagnosis). Outcome measures included annual rate of and time to first exacerbation, mortality risk, prevalence of comorbidities and health care utilization. Results: More patients with late diagnosis (n=8827) than with early diagnosis (n=3870) had a recent comorbid diagnosis of asthma (22.0% vs 3.9%; P
PubMed ID
31190785 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Impact of Exacerbation Frequency on Clinical and Economic Outcomes in Swedish COPD Patients: The ARCTIC Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature311239
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2021; 16:701-713
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2021
Author
Kjell Larsson
Christer Janson
Karin Lisspers
Björn Ställberg
Gunnar Johansson
Florian S Gutzwiller
Karen Mezzi
Bine Kjoeller Bjerregaard
Leif Jorgensen
Author Affiliation
Integrative Toxicology, The National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2021; 16:701-713
Date
2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess the association between exacerbation frequency and clinical and economic outcomes in patients with COPD.
Electronic medical record data linked to National Health Registries were collected from COPD patients at 52 Swedish primary care centers (2000-2014). The outcomes analyzed were exacerbation rate, mortality, COPD treatments, lung function and healthcare costs during the follow-up period. Based on the exacerbation rate two years before index date, the patients were initially classified into three groups, either 0, 1 or =2 exacerbations per year. After the index date, the classification into exacerbation groups was updated each year based on the exacerbation rate during the last year of follow-up. A sensitivity analysis was conducted excluding patients with asthma diagnosis from the analysis.
In total 18,586 COPD patients were analyzed. A majority of the patients (60-70%) who either have had no exacerbation or frequent exacerbations (=2/year) during the pre-index period remained in their group (ie, with 0 or =2 annual exacerbations) during up to 11 years of follow-up. Compared with having no exacerbation, mortality was higher in patients having 1 (HR; 2.06 [1.93-2.20]) and =2 (4.58 [4.33-4.84]) exacerbations at any time during the follow-up. Lung function decline was more rapid in patients with frequent exacerbations and there was an almost linear relationship between exacerbations frequency and mortality. Total healthcare costs were higher in the frequent exacerbation group (=2/year) than in patients with no or one exacerbation annually (p
PubMed ID
33776429 View in PubMed
Less detail

Indacaterol/glycopyrronium is cost-effective compared to salmeterol/fluticasone in COPD: FLAME-based modelling in a Swedish population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287593
Source
Respir Res. 2017 Dec 11;18(1):206
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-11-2017
Author
Leif Bjermer
Job F M van Boven
Madlaina Costa-Scharplatz
Dorothy L Keininger
Florian S Gutzwiller
Karin Lisspers
Ronan Mahon
Petter Olsson
Nicolas Roche
Source
Respir Res. 2017 Dec 11;18(1):206
Date
Dec-11-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of indacaterol/glycopyrronium (IND/GLY) versus salmeterol/fluticasone (SFC) in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients with moderate to very severe airflow limitation and =1 exacerbation in the preceding year.
A previously published and validated patient-level simulation model was adapted using clinical data from the FLAME trial and real-world cost data from the ARCTIC study. Costs (total monetary costs comprising drug, maintenance, exacerbation, and pneumonia costs) and health outcomes (life-years (LYs), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs)) were projected over various time horizons (1, 5, 10 years, and lifetime) from the Swedish payer's perspective and were discounted at 3% annually. Uncertainty in model input values was studied through one-way and probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Subgroup analyses were also performed.
IND/GLY was associated with lower costs and better outcomes compared with SFC over all the analysed time horizons. Use of IND/GLY resulted in additional 0.192 LYs and 0.134 QALYs with cost savings of €1211 compared with SFC over lifetime. The net monetary benefit (NMB) was estimated to be €8560 based on a willingness-to-pay threshold of €55,000/QALY. The NMB was higher in the following subgroups: severe (GOLD 3), high risk and more symptoms (GOLD D), females, and current smokers.
IND/GLY is a cost-effective treatment compared with SFC in COPD patients with mMRC dyspnea grade?=?2, moderate to very severe airflow limitation, and =1 exacerbation in the preceding year.
Notes
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2004 Mar;23(3):456-6315065839
Cites: Clin Respir J. 2012 Apr;6(2):120-721651748
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2016 Jan 18;11:123-3226848262
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2016 Sep 19;11:2191-220127703341
Cites: Respir Med. 2014 Dec;108(12):1786-9325307414
Cites: Appl Health Econ Health Policy. 2016 Oct;14 (5):579-9427516088
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 2013 Feb;31(2):151-6123329431
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Jun 05;10:1015-2626082625
Cites: Chest. 2006 Oct;130(4):1117-2817035446
Cites: Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2007 Oct 1;4(7):554-6417878469
Cites: Thorax. 2013 Nov;68(11):1029-3624130228
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012 Sep 12;(9):CD00682922972099
Cites: Lancet Respir Med. 2013 Mar;1(1):51-6024321804
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2013 Aug 30;(8):CD00682623990350
Cites: Pharmacoeconomics. 2017 Jan;35(1):43-6327592021
Cites: Respir Med. 2013 Dec;107(12):1931-823910072
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2016 Jun 9;374(23 ):2222-3427181606
Cites: BMC Pulm Med. 2012 Jan 09;12:122230685
Cites: Prim Care Respir J. 2013 Mar;22(1):92-10023135217
Cites: Respirology. 2016 Jan;21(1):14-2326494423
PubMed ID
29228950 View in PubMed
Less detail

Osteoporosis and fracture risk associated with inhaled corticosteroid use among Swedish COPD patients: the ARCTIC study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304587
Source
Eur Respir J. 2021 Feb; 57(2):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2021
Author
Christer Janson
Karin Lisspers
Björn Ställberg
Gunnar Johansson
Florian S Gutzwiller
Karen Mezzi
Linda Mindeholm
Bine Kjoeller Bjerregaard
Leif Jorgensen
Kjell Larsson
Author Affiliation
Respiratory, Allergy and Sleep Research, Dept of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden christer.janson@medsci.uu.se.
Source
Eur Respir J. 2021 Feb; 57(2):
Date
Feb-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
The effect of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) on the risk of osteoporosis and fracture in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess this risk in patients with COPD.Electronic medical record data linked to National Health Registries were collected from COPD patients and matched reference controls at 52 Swedish primary care centres from 2000 to 2014. The outcomes analysed were the effect of ICS on all fractures, fractures typically related to osteoporosis, recorded osteoporosis diagnosis, prescriptions of drugs for osteoporosis and a combined measure of any osteoporosis-related event. The COPD patients were stratified by the level of ICS exposure.A total of 9651 patients with COPD and 59?454 matched reference controls were analysed. During the follow-up, 19.9% of COPD patients had at least one osteoporosis-related event compared with 12.9% of reference controls (p
PubMed ID
32972982 View in PubMed
Less detail

Real-world retrospective cohort study ARCTIC shows burden of comorbidities in Swedish COPD versus non-COPD patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294872
Source
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med. 2018 Sep 10; 28(1):33
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Sep-10-2018
Author
Björn Ställberg
Christer Janson
Kjell Larsson
Gunnar Johansson
Konstantinos Kostikas
Jean-Bernard Gruenberger
Florian S Gutzwiller
Leif Jorgensen
Milica Uhde
Karin Lisspers
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. b.stallberg@telia.com.
Source
NPJ Prim Care Respir Med. 2018 Sep 10; 28(1):33
Date
Sep-10-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Abstract
This study aimed to generate real-world evidence to assess the burden of comorbidities in COPD patients, to effectively manage these patients and optimize the associated healthcare resource allocation. ARCTIC is a large, real-world, retrospective cohort study conducted in Swedish COPD patients using electronic medical record data collected between 2000 and 2014. These patients were studied for prevalence of various comorbidities and for association of these comorbidities with exacerbations, mortality, and healthcare costs compared with an age-, sex-, and comorbidities-matched non-COPD reference population. A total of 17,479 patients with COPD were compared with 84,514 non-COPD reference population. A significantly higher prevalence of various comorbidities was observed in COPD patients 2 years post-diagnosis vs. reference population, with the highest percentage increase observed for cardiovascular diseases (81.8% vs. 30.7%). Among the selected comorbidities, lung cancer was relatively more prevalent in COPD patients vs. reference population (relative risk, RR?=?5.97, p?
Notes
Cites: Lancet Respir Med. 2015 Aug;3(8):631-9 PMID 26208998
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2008 Jan;31(1):204-12 PMID 18166598
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2016 Apr 06;16:121 PMID 27052659
Cites: Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2017 Aug;21(16):3680-3689 PMID 28925473
Cites: Respir Med. 2006 Jan;100(1):87-93 PMID 15893921
Cites: Respir Res. 2017 Feb 6;18(1):31 PMID 28166777
Cites: Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2012 Jul 15;186(2):155-61 PMID 22561964
Cites: BMC Pulm Med. 2018 Jan 25;18(1):17 PMID 29370846
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Apr 2;360(14):1418-28 PMID 19339721
Cites: J Glob Health. 2015 Dec;5(2):020415 PMID 26755942
Cites: Lung. 2010 Aug;188(4):321-9 PMID 20066539
Cites: Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008 May 1;5(4):549-55 PMID 18453370
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2015 Sep;46(3):846-9 PMID 25882807
Cites: Lancet. 2012 Dec 15;380(9859):2095-128 PMID 23245604
Cites: Chest. 2005 Oct;128(4):2099-107 PMID 16236861
Cites: Semin Respir Crit Care Med. 2015 Aug;36(4):575-91 PMID 26238643
Cites: Multidiscip Respir Med. 2015 Aug 05;10(1):24 PMID 26246895
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2015 Jan 22;10:173-83 PMID 25653516
Cites: Proc Am Thorac Soc. 2008 Dec 1;5(8):848-56 PMID 19017740
Cites: Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis. 2018 Jan 11;13:275-285 PMID 29391785
Cites: Chest. 2015 Jul;148(1):138-150 PMID 25675282
Cites: Thorax. 2010 Aug;65(8):719-25 PMID 20685748
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2008 Oct;32(4):962-9 PMID 18579551
Cites: PLoS One. 2013 May 17;8(5):e63285 PMID 23691009
Cites: Eur Respir J. 2014 Oct;44(4):1055-68 PMID 25142482
PubMed ID
30202023 View in PubMed
Less detail

10 records – page 1 of 1.