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Assessment of police calls for suicidal behavior in a concentrated urban setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171591
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2005 Dec;56(12):1606-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Flora I Matheson
Maria I Creatore
Piotr Gozdyra
Rahim Moineddin
Sean B Rourke
Richard H Glazier
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, St. Michael's Hospital, and Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mathesonf@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2005 Dec;56(12):1606-9
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Canada
Crisis Intervention
Emergency Services, Psychiatric
Female
Hotlines
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Police
Sex Factors
Suicide - prevention & control - psychology - trends
Urban Population
Abstract
As a result of deinstitutionalization over the past half-century, police have become frontline mental health care workers. This study assessed five-year patterns of police calls for suicidal behavior in Toronto, Canada. Police responded to an average of 1,422 calls for suicidal behavior per year, 15 percent of which involved completed suicides (24 percent of male callers and 8 percent of female callers). Calls for suicidal behavior increased by 4 percent among males and 17 percent among females over the study period. The rate of completed suicides decreased by 22 percent among males and 31 percent among females. Compared with women, men were more likely to die from physical (as opposed to chemical) methods (22 percent and 43 percent, respectively). The study results highlight the importance of understanding changes in patterns and types of suicidal behavior to police training and preparedness.
PubMed ID
16339628 View in PubMed
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Breastfeeding as a means to prevent infant morbidity and mortality in Aboriginal Canadians: A population prevented fraction analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265523
Source
Can J Public Health. 2015;106(4):e217-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Kathryn E McIsaac
Rahim Moineddin
Flora I Matheson
Source
Can J Public Health. 2015;106(4):e217-22
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Abstract
Canadian Aboriginal infants experience poor health compared with other Canadian infants. Breastfeeding protects against many infant infections that Canadian Aboriginals disproportionately experience. The objective of our research was to estimate the proportion of select infant infection and mortality outcomes that could be prevented if all Canadian Aboriginal infants were breastfed.
We used Levin's formula to estimate the proportion of three infectious outcomes and one mortality outcome that could be prevented in infancy by breastfeeding. Estimates were calculated for First Nations (both on- and off-reserve), Métis and Inuit as well as all Canadian infants for comparison. We extracted prevalence estimates of breastfeeding practices from national population-based surveys. We extracted relative risk estimates from published meta-analyses.
Between 5.1% and 10.6% of otitis media, 24.3% and 41.4% of gastrointestinal infection, 13.8% and 26.1% of hospitalizations from lower respiratory tract infections, and 12.9% and 24.6% of sudden infant death could be prevented in Aboriginal infants if they received any breastfeeding.
Interventions that promote, protect and support breastfeeding may prevent a substantial proportion of infection and mortality in Canadian Aboriginal infants.
PubMed ID
26285193 View in PubMed
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Community-based aftercare and return to custody in a national sample of substance-abusing women offenders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135271
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 Jun;101(6):1126-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Flora I Matheson
Sherri Doherty
Brian A Grant
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael's Hospital, and the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2011 Jun;101(6):1126-32
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aftercare
Canada
Community Health Services
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Prisoners - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Program Evaluation
Recurrence - prevention & control
Substance Abuse Treatment Centers
Substance-Related Disorders - prevention & control - rehabilitation
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
We evaluated the effectiveness of the Community Relapse Prevention and Maintenance (CRPM) program, developed by Correctional Service Canada to better meet the needs of women offenders with drug problems.
Using survival analysis, we investigated the association between exposure and nonexposure to CRPM and return to custody among a national sample of women offenders released from 1 of 6 federal institutions across Canada during the period May 1, 1998 to August 31, 2007.
After control for other risk factors, women who were not exposed to CRPM were 10 times more likely than were women exposed to CRPM to return to custody 1 year after release from prison, with more than a third returning to prison within the first 6 months.
Aftercare is a critical component of a woman's support system after she leaves prison. Strategies that improve access to community aftercare are imperative for improving the life chances and health of these women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21493930 View in PubMed
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Density, destinations or both? A comparison of measures of walkability in relation to transportation behaviors, obesity and diabetes in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256371
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e85295
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Richard H Glazier
Maria I Creatore
Jonathan T Weyman
Ghazal Fazli
Flora I Matheson
Peter Gozdyra
Rahim Moineddin
Vered Kaufman Shriqui
Gillian L Booth
Author Affiliation
Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada ; Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada ; Department of Family and Community Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada ; Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada ; Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2014;9(1):e85295
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Behavior
Bicycling
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - physiopathology
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Density
Transportation - statistics & numerical data
Walking
Young Adult
Abstract
The design of suburban communities encourages car dependency and discourages walking, characteristics that have been implicated in the rise of obesity. Walkability measures have been developed to capture these features of urban built environments. Our objective was to examine the individual and combined associations of residential density and the presence of walkable destinations, two of the most commonly used and potentially modifiable components of walkability measures, with transportation, overweight, obesity, and diabetes. We examined associations between a previously published walkability measure and transportation behaviors and health outcomes in Toronto, Canada, a city of 2.6 million people in 2011. Data sources included the Canada census, a transportation survey, a national health survey and a validated administrative diabetes database. We depicted interactions between residential density and the availability of walkable destinations graphically and examined them statistically using general linear modeling. Individuals living in more walkable areas were more than twice as likely to walk, bicycle or use public transit and were significantly less likely to drive or own a vehicle compared with those living in less walkable areas. Individuals in less walkable areas were up to one-third more likely to be obese or to have diabetes. Residential density and the availability of walkable destinations were each significantly associated with transportation and health outcomes. The combination of high levels of both measures was associated with the highest levels of walking or bicycling (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
24454837 View in PubMed
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Development of the Canadian Marginalization Index: a new tool for the study of inequality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128386
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(8 Suppl 2):S12-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Flora I Matheson
James R Dunn
Katherine L W Smith
Rahim Moineddin
Richard H Glazier
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, Keenan Research Centre, Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute of St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. mathesonf@smh.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2012;103(8 Suppl 2):S12-6
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Censuses
Health Status Disparities
Health Surveys
Humans
Reproducibility of Results
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
Area-based measures of socio-economic status are increasingly used in population health research. Based on previous research and theory, the Canadian Marginalization Index (CAN-Marg) was created to reflect four dimensions of marginalization: residential instability, material deprivation, dependency and ethnic concentration. The objective of this paper was threefold: to describe CAN-Marg; to illustrate its stability across geographic area and time; and to describe its association with health and behavioural problems.
CAN-Marg was created at the dissemination area (DA) and census tract level for census years 2001 and 2006, using factor analysis. Descriptions of 18 health and behavioural problems were selected using individual-level data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 3.1 and 2007/08. CAN-Marg quintiles created at the DA level (2006) were assigned to individual CCHS records. Multilevel logistic regression modeling was conducted to examine associations between marginalization and CCHS health and behavioural problems.
The index demonstrated marked stability across time and geographic area. Each of the four dimensions showed strong and significant associations with the selected health and behavioural problems, and these associations differed depending on which of the dimensions of marginalization was examined.
CAN-Marg is a census-based, empirically derived and theoretically informed tool designed to reflect a broader conceptualization of Canadian marginalization.
PubMed ID
23618065 View in PubMed
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Drinking in context: the influence of gender and neighbourhood deprivation on alcohol consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136927
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Jun;66(6):e4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Flora I Matheson
Heather L White
Rahim Moineddin
James R Dunn
Richard H Glazier
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, St Michael’s Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mathesonf@smh.ca
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2012 Jun;66(6):e4
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty
Residence Characteristics
Sex Factors
Abstract
Findings from contextual studies have shown that living in both poor and affluent neighbourhoods increases the risk of drinking and drug use, but few studies have examined the connection between neighbourhood context and drinking from a gender perspective.
We investigated the association between gender, neighbourhood deprivation and weekly drinking behaviour (number of drinks) in a national sample of 93?457 Canadians using multilevel zero-inflated Poisson regression. A cross-level interaction between gender and neighbourhood deprivation was examined while controlling for other potential risk factors.
53% of Canadians reported having at least one drink in the last year (men=61%; women=46%). Among respondents who were drinkers, the average number of drinks per week was 6.4 with male drinkers reporting an average of 7.9 and female drinkers reporting an average of 4.6. Neighbourhood material deprivation was independently associated with weekly drinking. Findings from multilevel analysis showed a u-shaped curve between neighbourhood deprivation and drinking, but only for men. Men living in the poorest neighbourhoods drank more weekly (8.5 drinks) than men living in neighbourhoods of wealthy (4.5 drinks) and mid-range deprivation (3.7 drinks). No difference in drinking by neighbourhood material deprivation was observed among women.
Men, like women, experience gender-specific health difficulties (eg, alcohol-related problems) suggesting the need for a gendered focus on policies and services related to women's and men's health. The challenge for public health and primary care is to work together to target risk-taking behaviours among men through treatment, prevention and cultural/educational messages aimed at building healthy lifestyles.
PubMed ID
21330461 View in PubMed
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Gender, income and immigration differences in depression in Canadian urban centres.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164076
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Mar-Apr;98(2):149-53
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katherine L W Smith
Flora I Matheson
Rahim Moineddin
Richard H Glazier
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2007 Mar-Apr;98(2):149-53
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Depression - epidemiology - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Income - classification - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Small-Area Analysis
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Immigrants tend to initially settle in urban centres. It is known that immigrants have lower rates of depression than the Canadian-born population, with the lowest rates among those who have arrived recently in Canada. It is established that women and low-income individuals are more likely to have depression. Given that recent immigration is a protective factor and female gender and low income are risk factors, the aim of this study was to explore a recent immigration-low income interaction by gender.
The study used 2000-01 Canadian Community Health Survey data. The sample consisted of 41,147 adults living in census metropolitan areas. Logistic regression was used to examine the effect of the interaction on depression.
The prevalence of depression in urban centres was 9.17% overall, 6.82% for men and 11.44% for women. The depression rate for recent immigrants was 5.24%, 3.87% for men and 6.64% for women. The depression rate among low-income individuals was 14.52%, 10.79% for men and 17.07% for women. The lowest-rate of depression was among low-income recent immigrant males (2.21%), whereas the highest rate was among low-income non-recent immigrant females (11.05%).
This study supports previous findings about the effects of income, immigration and gender on depression. The findings are novel in that they suggest a differential income effect for male and female recent immigrants. These findings have implications for public health planning, immigration and settlement services and policy development.
PubMed ID
17441541 View in PubMed
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Geographic methods for understanding and responding to disparities in mammography use in Toronto, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178642
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2004 Sep;19(9):952-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2004
Author
Richard Henry Glazier
Maria Isabella Creatore
Piotr Gozdyra
Flora I Matheson
Leah S Steele
Eleanor Boyle
Rahim Moineddin
Author Affiliation
Inner City Health Research Unit, Department of Family and Community Medicine, St. Michael's Hospital, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5B 1W8. richard.glazier@utoronto.ca
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2004 Sep;19(9):952-61
Date
Sep-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cluster analysis
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Humans
Income
Mammography - utilization
Middle Aged
Ontario
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To use spatial and epidemiologic analyses to understand disparities in mammography use and to formulate interventions to increase its uptake in low-income, high-recent immigration areas in Toronto, Canada.
We compared mammography rates in four income-immigration census tract groups. Data were obtained from the 1996 Canadian census and 2000 physician billing claims. Risk ratios, linear regression, multilayer maps, and spatial analysis were used to examine utilization by area for women age 45 to 64 years.
Residential population of inner city Toronto, Canada, with a 1996 population of 780,000.
Women age 45 to 64 residing in Toronto's inner city in the year 2000.
Among 113,762 women age 45 to 64, 27,435 (24%) had received a mammogram during 2000 and 91,542 (80%) had seen a physician. Only 21% of women had a mammogram in the least advantaged group (low income--high immigration), compared with 27% in the most advantaged group (high income--low immigration) (risk ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.75 to 0.84). Multilayer maps demonstrated a low income-high immigration band running through Toronto's inner city and low mammography rates within that band. There was substantial geographic clustering of study variables.
We found marked variation in mammography rates by area, with the lowest rates associated with low income and high immigration. Spatial patterns identified areas with low mammography and low physician visit rates appropriate for outreach and public education interventions. We also identified areas with low mammography and high physician visit rates appropriate for interventions targeted at physicians.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15333060 View in PubMed
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Incentives for research participation: policy and practice from Canadian corrections.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123450
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 Aug;102(8):1438-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Flora I Matheson
Pamela Forrester
Amanda Brazil
Sherri Doherty
Lindy Affleck
Author Affiliation
Centre for Research on Inner City Health, St Michael's Hospital, the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. mathesonf@smh.ca
Source
Am J Public Health. 2012 Aug;102(8):1438-42
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Biomedical Research - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Canada
Government Regulation
Guidelines as Topic
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Human Experimentation - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Prisoners - legislation & jurisprudence
Questionnaires
Abstract
We explored current policies and practices on the use of incentives in research involving adult offenders under correctional supervision in prison and in the community (probation and parole) in Canada. We contacted the correctional departments of each of the Canadian provinces and territories, as well as the federal government department responsible for offenders serving sentences of two years or more. Findings indicated that two departments had formal policy whereas others had unwritten practices, some prohibiting their use and others allowing incentives on a case-by-case basis. Given the differences across jurisdictions, it would be valuable to examine how current incentive policies and practices are implemented to inform national best practices on incentives for offender-based research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22698018 View in PubMed
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Influence of neighborhood deprivation, gender and ethno-racial origin on smoking behavior of Canadian youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature136522
Source
Prev Med. 2011 May;52(5):376-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Flora I Matheson
Marie C LaFreniere
Heather L White
Rahim Moineddin
James R Dunn
Richard H Glazier
Author Affiliation
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. MathesonF@smh.toronto.on.ca
Source
Prev Med. 2011 May;52(5):376-80
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada - epidemiology
Censuses
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Poverty Areas
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - ethnology
Abstract
Deprived neighborhoods play an important role in adult smoking behavior, but little research exists about youth on this topic. This study explored the relationship between deprivation and youth smoking to examine whether this association differs by gender and ethno-racial origin.
Individual-level data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2000-2005) were combined with neighborhood-level data from the 2001 Canada Census to assess smoking among youth aged 12-18 (n = 15,615).
Youth who were female (OR = 1.27, 95%CI:1.16-1.38), White (OR = 1.95, 95%CI:1.71-2.21) and living in deprived neighborhoods (OR = 1.22, 95%CI:1.16-1.28) were more likely to smoke. In multilevel models, White females were more likely to smoke relative to non-White females and males (OR = 1.42, 95%CI:1.06-1.89). Youth with a strong sense of community belonging and living in deprived neighborhoods were at increased risk of smoking (OR = 1.18, 95%CI:1.06-1.32). The individual-level risk factor, household smoker, contributed substantially to youth smoking reducing the bivariate association between material deprivation and smoking by 33%.
White females, youth cohabiting with other smokers and youth living in poor neighborhoods with a strong sense of community belonging, are at an increased risk of smoking. Future anti-smoking efforts might have greater impact if they target at-risk youth as well as household members who cohabit with youth.
PubMed ID
21371497 View in PubMed
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19 records – page 1 of 2.