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Antihypertensive treatment, high triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and risk of ischemic heart disease mortality: a 16-year follow-up in the Copenhagen male study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145411
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2010 Jun;8(3):215-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2010
Author
Poul Suadicani
Hans Ole Hein
Finn Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Male Study, Epidemiologic Research Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Bispebjerg, Denmark. ps11@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2010 Jun;8(3):215-22
Date
Jun-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Cholesterol, HDL - blood
Denmark
Dyslipidemias - blood - complications - mortality
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - mortality
Incidence
Male
Men's health
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - complications - mortality
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - etiology - mortality
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Triglycerides - blood
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that metabolic syndrome dyslipidemia is a major risk factor for ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality among men taking antihypertensive medication.
This was a 16-year follow up of 2,986 men 53-75 years old without overt cardiovascular disease; 357 men used antihypertensive medicine. Potential risk factors were type of baseline medication, blood pressure, diabetes, fasting serum triglycerides (TG), high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) and total cholesterol, glucosuria, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, cancer history, body mass index, alcohol and tobacco use, leisure time physical activity, social class, and age. The main outcome was IHD mortality.
Men treated for hypertension had a two-fold higher cumulative incidence of IHD mortality during the follow up compared to other men (12.0% vs, 5.8%). Dyslipidemia was defined as TG >or=1.70 mmol/L or HDL-C
PubMed ID
20156073 View in PubMed
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Association between atherosclerosis and female lung cancer--a Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9580
Source
Lung Cancer. 2003 Dec;42(3):247-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Lene Dreyer
Eva Prescott
Finn Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. eso@post6.tele.dk
Source
Lung Cancer. 2003 Dec;42(3):247-54
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Arteriosclerosis - complications
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Denmark
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Patients suffering from atherosclerotic diseases are prone to repeated episodes of ischemia/reperfusion that has been demonstrated to induce oxidative stress by formation of oxygen free radicals. It might therefore be expected that such endogenously exposure to free radicals increases the individual cancer risk in patients with atherosclerotic diseases. We therefore studied the sex-specific risk of lung cancer and other cancers in atherosclerotic patients in a prospective study conducted in the Copenhagen area. The study cohort was linked to the Danish Hospital Discharge Register and we identified 2261 1-year survivors of atherosclerotic diseases through 1977 and 1993, while 26150 of the study subjects had no record of an atherosclerotic diagnosis. After linkage to the Danish Cancer Registry associations between atherosclerosis and cancer were analysed for each sex separately by means of Cox proportional hazard regression models. Atherosclerotic women had a significant RR of lung cancer of 3.26 (95% CI: 1.95-5.46) compared to non-atherosclerotic women after adjustment for age, calendar period, study population, smoking habits, school education and alcohol consumption. No significant risk of male lung cancer, RR=1.12 (95% CI: 0.77-1.64), or other smoking-related cancers in either sex was observed after multivariate adjustment. Atherosclerosis did not predict non-smoking-related cancers in general in either men, RR=0.91 (95% CI 0.69-1.20), or women, RR=0.93 (95% CI: 0.64-1.35). We hypothesize that oxidative stress due to episodes of ischemia/reperfusion increases the risk of lung cancer in atherosclerotic females because of a gender specific susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage.
PubMed ID
14644511 View in PubMed
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Deployment-related risk factors of low back pain: a study among danish soldiers deployed to Iraq.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261896
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Apr;179(4):451-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Lars Ravnborg Nissen
Jacob Louis Marott
Finn Gyntelberg
Bernadette Guldager
Source
Mil Med. 2014 Apr;179(4):451-8
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Iraq War, 2003-2011
Low Back Pain - epidemiology
Male
Military Personnel
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Young Adult
Abstract
Where much is known about the consequences of spinal and low back pain (LBP) during military deployments, there is lesser knowledge of risk factors for LBP among the deployed forces. The objective of this study was to identify deployment-related exposures associated with LBP. The study was a questionnaire-based cohort study among 1,931 Danish soldiers deployed to Iraq. Of the 680 respondents, 175 (26%) reported LBP. The population of respondents was adjusted for potential nonresponse bias. The associations between LBP and explanatory variables were analyzed using ordinal logistic regression models. Older age (p = 0.016), support from leaders (odds ratio [OR] = 1.69, p = 0.019), psychological stress (OR = 1.71, p = 0.009), awkward working positions (OR = 1.98, p = 0.001), and working in depots or storehouses (OR = 2.60, p = 0.041) were found to be associated with LBP after adjustment of all other variables. Combat and exposure to work, sport, or traffic accidents were not associated with LBP in this study, which was attributed to the characteristics of the actual mission. Preventive measures should include predeployment preparation of leaders to cope with LBP and other musculoskeletal trouble among their subordinates and involve medical personnel, especially deployed physiotherapists, by giving advice to soldiers of different military occupational specialties on how to optimize ergonomics at work.
PubMed ID
24690972 View in PubMed
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Determinants of obesity among men with the lewis double-negative blood group: a genetic marker of obesity-the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138983
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2011 Apr;9(2):99-103
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Finn Gyntelberg
Hans Ole Hein
Poul Suadicani
Author Affiliation
Bispebjerg Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Epidemiological Research Unit, Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Copenhagen, Denmark. fgyn0001@bbhregionh.dk
Source
Metab Syndr Relat Disord. 2011 Apr;9(2):99-103
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Follow-Up Studies
Genetic markers
Humans
Lewis Blood-Group System - genetics - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Genetic
Obesity - blood - diagnosis
Phenotype
Regression Analysis
Smoking - adverse effects
Abstract
Middle-aged and elderly men with the Lewis blood group phenotype Le(a-b-), have a two-fold higher prevalence of obesity than others. We investigated if the association could be ascribed to differences in lifestyle, or if obesity determinants had a different impact in this group.
This was a cross-sectional study of 3,290 men aged 53-74 years with a mean of 63 years drawn from the Copenhagen Male Study. The main outcome measure was prevalence of obesity [body mass index (BMI) =30 (kg/m(2))].
Among men with the Le(a-b-) phenotype (n?=?315), the prevalence of obesity was 15.6%; it was 8.1% among men with other phenotypes (n?=?2,975, p?7 cups/day vs. less) and obesity, and between lacking fat avoidance and obesity; the odds ratio [95% confidence interval (CI)] for high coffee consumption was 0.2(0.1-0.7) and for avoidance of fatty foods 2.0(1.04-3.7). The association of obesity with leisure time physical activity, smoking, alcohol use, use of sugar in hot beverages, and tea consumption, did not differ between Le(a-b-) men and others.
Our findings suggests a gene-environment interaction between lifestyle and obesity. Because some ethnic groups have up to 40% with the Le(a-b-) phenotype, the above observations may be of significant public health interest.
PubMed ID
21117959 View in PubMed
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Elevated resting heart rate, physical fitness and all-cause mortality: a 16-year follow-up in the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114654
Source
Heart. 2013 Jun;99(12):882-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Magnus Thorsten Jensen
Poul Suadicani
Hans Ole Hein
Finn Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Copenhagen University Hospital Gentofte, Niels Andersens Vej 65, 2900 Hellerup, Denmark. magnustjensen@gmail.com
Source
Heart. 2013 Jun;99(12):882-7
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - physiopathology
Cause of Death - trends
Denmark - epidemiology
Electrocardiography - methods
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Rest - physiology
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To examine whether elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is an independent risk factor for mortality or a mere marker of physical fitness (VO2Max).
This was a prospective cohort study: the Copenhagen Male Study, a longitudinal study of healthy middle-aged employed men. Subjects with sinus rhythm and without known cardiovascular disease or diabetes were included. RHR was assessed from a resting ECG at study visit in 1985-1986. VO2Max was determined by the Ã?strand bicycle ergometer test in 1970-1971. Subjects were classified into categories according to level of RHR. Associations with mortality were studied in multivariate Cox models adjusted for physical fitness, leisure-time physical activity and conventional cardiovascular risk factors.
2798 subjects were followed for 16 years. 1082 deaths occurred. RHR was inversely related to physical fitness (p 90 had an HR (95% CI) of 3.06 (1.97 to 4.75). With RHR as a continuous variable, risk of mortality increased with 16% (10-22) per 10 beats per minute (bpm). There was a borderline interaction with smoking (p = 0.07); risk per 10 bpm increase in RHR was 20% (12-27) in smokers, and 14% (4-24) in non-smokers.
Elevated RHR is a risk factor for mortality independent of physical fitness, leisure-time physical activity and other major cardiovascular risk factors.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23595657 View in PubMed
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Fitness, work, and leisure-time physical activity and ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality among men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144585
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):366-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Andreas Holtermann
Ole Steen Mortensen
Hermann Burr
Karen Søgaard
Finn Gyntelberg
Poul Suadicani
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. aho@nrcwe.dk
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):366-72
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking
Angina Pectoris - epidemiology - mortality
Body mass index
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Intermittent Claudication - epidemiology - mortality
Leisure Activities
Male
Middle Aged
Motor Activity
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - mortality
Myocardial Ischemia - epidemiology - mortality
Occupational Health
Oxygen consumption
Physical Fitness
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Work
Abstract
Our aim was to study the relative impact of physical fitness, physical demands at work, and physical activity during leisure time on ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and all-cause mortality among employed men with pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD).
We carried out a 30-year follow-up of the Copenhagen Male Study of 274 gainfully employed men, aged 40-59 years who had a history of CVD (ie, myocardial infarction, angina pectoris, and intermittent claudication). We estimated physical fitness [maximal oxygen consumption (VO (2)Max)] using the Astrand cycling test and determined physical work demands and leisure-time physical activity using a self-reported questionnaire. Results Among 274 men with a history of CVD, 93 men died from IHD. Using male employees with a history of CVD and a low level of fitness as the reference group, our Cox analyses - adjusted for age, blood pressure, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, physical work demands, leisure-time physical activity, and social class - showed a substantially reduced risk for IHD mortality among employees who were intermediately fit [VO (2)Max range 25-36; hazard ratio (HR) 0.54, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) CI 0.32-0.93] and highly fit (VO (2)Max range 37-50; HR 0.28, 95% CI 0.12-0.66). We found a positive, but statistically non-significant association between physical demands at work and all-cause mortality.
Among gainfully employed men with pre-existing CVD, a high physical fitness was associated with a substantially reduced risk for IHD and all-cause mortality.
Notes
Comment In: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2010 Sep;36(5):349-5520686737
PubMed ID
20352173 View in PubMed
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Increased psychological distress among Danish Gulf War veterans--without evidence for a neurotoxic background. The Danish Gulf War Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45678
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2004 Feb;51(1):108-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Torben Ishøy
Joachim Knop
Poul Suadicani
Bernadette Guldager
Merete Appleyard
Finn Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, H:S Copenhagen University Hospital, DK-2400 Copenhagen. ti@dgma.dk
Source
Dan Med Bull. 2004 Feb;51(1):108-13
Date
Feb-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests
Neurotoxicity Syndromes - diagnosis
Persian Gulf Syndrome - diagnosis - etiology
Psychomotor Performance
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - diagnosis
Veterans - psychology
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Compared with controls, up to six years after their return, Danish Gulf War veterans have a significantly higher prevalence of self-reported neuropsychological symptoms, potentially as a result of neurotoxic exposure during deployment. We tested the hypotheses that: 1) GW veterans would perform less well than controls using a computerized neuromotor test battery; and that 2) GW veterans have a psychological profile different from that of controls. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 686 subjects who had been deployed in the Persian Gulf within the period August 2, 1990 until December 31, 1997; the control group comprised 231 subjects matched according to age, gender and profession. All participants underwent clinical and paraclinical examinations, along with a neuromotor test battery (CATSYS Test System) and a psychological health status questionnaire, the SCL-90-R rating scale. RESULTS: No differences were found between GW veterans and controls with respect to lifestyle and cohabitational characteristics. Differences between the two groups with respect to neuromotor function were very small. Within the GW veteran group, stratified according to clustering of neuropsychological symptoms, and stratified according to SCL-90-R score, no trends were found suggesting reduced motor function with increasing symptoms. Of nine dimensions constructed on the basis of the SCL-90-R items, six were significantly associated with being a Gulf War veteran. Statistically, the strongest associations were found for ratings of the obsessive-compulsive dimension and of the depression dimension. No associations were found with respect to phobic anxiety, paranoid ideation, and psychoticism. INTERPRETATION: The increased psychological distress found among Danish GW veterans seemed rather due to a mentally distressing environment than to neurotoxic exposure.
PubMed ID
16009075 View in PubMed
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Lifestyle, social class, and obesity-the Copenhagen Male Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9206
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Jun;12(3):236-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Poul Suadicani
Hans OleHein
Finn Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
The Copenhagen Male Study, Epidemiological Research Unit, Clinic of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. PS11@bbh.hosp.dk
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2005 Jun;12(3):236-42
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - epidemiology - etiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Social Class
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: With the implicit purpose of identifying relevant intervention targets, the aim of the study was to test if lifestyle factors associated with obesity are unevenly distributed across social groups, and whether an uneven distribution of such factors may contribute to the explanation of social differences in obesity. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study of 3290 men aged 53-75 years (mean=63) carried out in 1985-1986 using in addition, data from a previous baseline established in 1970-1971. Information about lifestyle factors was obtained from a questionnaire validated during an interview. Potential risk factors were smoking history, alcohol consumption, leisure time physical activity (LTPA), and from the 1985-1986 study only: consumption of tea and coffee, use of sugar in tea or coffee, and avoidance of fat in foods. The clinical examination included measurements of height and weight. Obesity was defined as a body mass index > or =30 (BMI=kg/m2). Based on information about education and job profile the men were subdivided into five social classes. RESULTS: Overall, 291 men (8.8%) were obese. The lower the social class the higher the proportion of obese men: in social classes I and II, 4.5% (of 953), social class III, 9.1% (of 636), social class IV, 11.1% (of 1353), and social class V, 11.6% (of 346), P
PubMed ID
15942422 View in PubMed
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Long work hours and physical fitness: 30-year risk of ischaemic heart disease and all-cause mortality among middle-aged Caucasian men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141012
Source
Heart. 2010 Oct;96(20):1638-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Andreas Holtermann
Ole Steen Mortensen
Hermann Burr
Karen Søgaard
Finn Gyntelberg
Poul Suadicani
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, Copenhagen Ø 2100, Denmark. aho@nrcwe.dk
Source
Heart. 2010 Oct;96(20):1638-44
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
European Continental Ancestry Group
Exercise Test - methods
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Occupational Diseases - etiology - mortality - physiopathology
Oxygen Consumption - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Risk Assessment - methods
Work Schedule Tolerance - physiology
Workload - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
No previous long-term studies have examined if workers with low physical fitness have an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality due to long work hours. The aim of this study was to test this hypothesis.
The study comprised 30-year follow-up of a cohort of 5249 gainfully employed men aged 40-59years in the Copenhagen Male Study. 274 men with cardiovascular disease were excluded from the follow-up. Physical fitness (maximal oxygen consumption, Vo(2)max) was estimated using the Åstrand bicycle ergometer test, and number of work hours was obtained from questionnaire items; 4943 men were eligible for the incidence study.
587 men (11.9%) died because of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). Cox analyses adjusted for age, blood pressure, smoking, alcohol, body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, physical work demands, and social class, showed that working more than 45h/week was associated with an increased risk of IHD mortality in the least fit (Vo(2)max range 15-26; HR 2.28, 95% CI 1.10 to 4.73), but not intermediate (Vo(2)max range 27-38; HR 0.94, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.51) and most fit men (Vo(2)max range 39-78; HR 0.91, 95% CI 0.41 to 2.02) referencing men working less than 40h/week.
The findings indicate that men with low physical fitness are at increased risk for IHD mortality from working long hours. Men working long hours should be physically fit.
PubMed ID
20820054 View in PubMed
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Moulds in floor dust - a particular problem in mechanically ventilated rooms? A study of adolescent schoolboys under the Danish moulds in buildings program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139090
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2011 Jul;37(4):332-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Harald W Meyer
Poul Suadicani
Peter A Nielsen
Torben Sigsgaard
Finn Gyntelberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg University Hospital, 2400 Copenhagen NV, Denmark. hmey0004@bbh.regionh.dk
Source
Scand J Work Environ Health. 2011 Jul;37(4):332-40
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Dust
Floors and Floorcoverings
Fungi
Humans
Male
Schools
Students
Ventilation
Abstract
To test the hypothesis that the association between levels of mould in floor dust and prevalence of potentially building-related symptoms may depend on the type of ventilation.
This stratified cross-sectional study is part of the Danish moulds in buildings program (DAMIB), including 503 adolescent schoolboys aged 13-17 years at 15 schools. Besides assessing symptom prevalences in questionnaires, we measured numerous potential risk factors in the school buildings.
Stratifying on type of ventilation (natural, exhaust only, or full mechanical ventilation system), the negative effect of high levels of mould in floor dust was more pronounced in rooms with mechanical ventilation system. With a variable combining high level of moulds in floor dust with type of ventilation in the classroom, a significantly increased risk was found for all symptoms in the mechanically ventilated classrooms with high mould concentrations. In multiple logistic regression models, significant odds ratios (OR) ranged from 3.9 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.5-10.1] (nasal congestion) to 17.0 (95% CI 2.1-138) (dizziness).
The combined effect of moulds in dust and ventilation form might be a result of the higher air flow keeping the dust in the breathing zone for a longer time, thereby increasing the exposure for the occupants of the classrooms. It is important in future indoor air research also to focus on the combination effects of risk factors, including the type of ventilation.
PubMed ID
21103804 View in PubMed
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28 records – page 1 of 3.