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Cardiac rehabilitation: health characteristics and socio-economic status among those who do not attend.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92806
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2008 Oct;18(5):479-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Nielsen Kirsten M
Faergeman Ole
Foldspang Anders
Larsen Mogens L
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology, Aarhus Sygehus University Hospital, Tage Hansens Gade 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. Melgaard@dadlnet.dk
Source
Eur J Public Health. 2008 Oct;18(5):479-83
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - epidemiology - etiology - rehabilitation
Patient compliance
Social Class
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is well documented, in randomised trials, to reduce mortality risk after myocardial infarction (MI). Selection of healthy patients for CR is a relatively unexplored problem. Our aims were to identify predictors of CR-attendance and to describe the prognosis as concerns mortality, re-admission and invasive treatment among CR-attendees as compared to CR-non-attendees. Methods: From a cohort of 138 290 persons aged 30-69 years, we identified consecutive MI patients, between 1 April 2000 and 31 March 2002. There were 206 MI patients, who survived until admission, and among the 200 who survived 30 days, 145 (72.5%) attended a comprehensive CR programme. Data were obtained from patient charts and from Danish population registers, and as a result we had no non-participation for the study. RESULTS: The 2-year mortality proportions for patients surviving the first 30 days of admission were 2.8 and 21.8% among CR-attendees and CR-non-attendees, respectively (P
PubMed ID
18614608 View in PubMed
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Climate change and preventive medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95580
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007 Dec;14(6):726-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2007
Author
Faergeman Ole
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology and Internal Medicine, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark. ferryman@mail.tele.dk
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007 Dec;14(6):726-9
Date
Dec-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Climate
Ecology - methods
Humans
Morbidity - trends
Preventive Medicine - methods
Public Health
World Health
Abstract
Thermal stress, food poisoning, infectious diseases, malnutrition, psychiatric illness as well as injury and death from floods, storms and fire are all likely to become more common as the earth warms and the climate becomes more variable. In contrast, obesity, type II diabetes and coronary artery disease do not result from climate change, but they do share causes with climate change. Burning fossil fuels, for example, is the major source of greenhouse gases, but it also makes pervasive physical inactivity possible. Similarly, modern agriculture's enormous production of livestock contributes substantially to greenhouse gas emissions, and it is the source of many of our most energy-rich foods. Physicians and societies of medical professionals have a particular responsibility, therefore, to contribute to the public discourse about climate change and what to do about it.
Notes
ReprintIn: Ugeskr Laeger. 2008 Aug 25;170(35):2667-818761852
PubMed ID
18043291 View in PubMed
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[Climate change, food production and human health]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95347
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3181-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Faergeman Ole
Østergaard Lars
Author Affiliation
Arhus Universitetshospital, Arhus Sygehus, Medicinsk Kardiologisk Afdeling A, Denmark. ferryman@mail.tele.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3181-4
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animal Husbandry
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Climate
Environmental pollution
Food Supply
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Meat - adverse effects - supply & distribution
Nutrition Policy
Risk factors
World Health
Zoonoses - microbiology - transmission
Abstract
Production of livestock accounts for 18% of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Although livestock products can alleviate malnutrition in poor countries, they are associated with diseases of affluence in wealthy countries. Red meat (pork, beef, sheep and goat), especially, is associated with higher rates of death due to cardiovascular disease and cancer. A policy of reducing consumption of red meat in wealthy countries and encouraging a limited consumption increase in poor countries would benefit the climate as well as human health.
PubMed ID
19857397 View in PubMed
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Comparative effect of atorvastatin (80 mg) versus simvastatin (20 to 40 mg) in preventing hospitalizations for heart failure in patients with previous myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89073
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2009 May 15;103(10):1381-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-2009
Author
Strandberg Timo E
Holme Ingar
Faergeman Ole
Kastelein John J P
Lindahl Christina
Larsen Mogens Lytken
Olsson Anders G
Pedersen Terje R
Tikkanen Matti J
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Sciences/Geriatrics, University of Oulu, and Oulu University Hospital, Unit of General Practice, Oulu, Finland. timo.strandberg@oulu.fi
Source
Am J Cardiol. 2009 May 15;103(10):1381-5
Date
May-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Heart Failure - epidemiology - prevention & control
Heptanoic Acids - therapeutic use
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Pyrroles - therapeutic use
Simvastatin - therapeutic use
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
We investigated whether intensive cholesterol lowering could more effectively prevent heart failure (HF) in secondary prevention. The IDEAL study was a 4.8-year prospective, randomized trial comparing "usual" simvastatin treatment (20 to 40 mg/day, n = 4,449) with high-dose atorvastatin (80 mg/day, n = 4,439) in patients with a history of myocardial infarction (MI). At baseline, 94% of patients (n = 8,351) had no history of HF. During the course of the trial, there were 222 new or recurrent hospitalizations for HF (57 and 165 in those with and without HF at baseline, respectively), 123 (2.8%) in the simvastatin group and 99 (2.2%) in the atorvastatin group (hazard ratio [HR] 0.81, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.62 to 1.05, p = 0.11). After adjustments, atorvastatin 80 mg was associated with a 26% decrease of new HF events compared with simvastatin 20 to 40 mg (HR 0.74, 95% CI 0.57 to 0.97, p = 0.03). Atorvastatin tended to be associated with fewer HF events in those with HF at baseline (n = 537, HR 0.65, 95% CI 0.38 to 1.11, p = 0.11) and those without HF at baseline (n = 8,351, HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.59 to 1.09, p = 0.15). Also, HF without preceding MI (n = 187) was decreased (HR 0.73, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.97, p = 0.03). In conclusion, atorvastatin 80 mg was more efficient than simvastatin 20 to 40 mg in preventing development of HF in patients with previous MI.
PubMed ID
19427432 View in PubMed
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How can we identify low- and high-risk patients among unselected patients with possible acute coronary syndrome?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79479
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2007 Jan;25(1):23-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2007
Author
Nielsen Kirsten Melgaard
Faergeman Ole
Larsen Mogens Lytken
Foldspang Anders
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology, Aarhus Sygehus University Hospital, Tage Hansens Gade 2, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. rlg04kmn@as.aaa.dk
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2007 Jan;25(1):23-31
Date
Jan-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Angina, Unstable - diagnosis
Cohort Studies
Coronary Care Units
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - mortality - physiopathology
Denmark
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Risk factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Prognosis among patients admitted with possible acute coronary syndrome (ACS) may differ from that of patients with definite ACS. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for mortality among unselected patients and to use the statistical model to identify patients at low or high mortality risk. METHODS: From April 1, 2000, to March 31, 2002, we identified all consecutive patients aged 30 to 69 years admitted to the 2 coronary care units covering the municipality of Aarhus, Denmark (population, 138,290). ACS was considered a possible diagnosis if the physician at admission (1) had noted the presence or absence of chest pain, (2) performed a 12-lead electrocardiogram, and (3) measured markers of myocardial necrosis. In 1576 consecutive patients these criteria were fulfilled. RESULTS: By logistic regression, predictors of mortality were age 60 and older, ST elevation, right bundle-branch block, arrhythmia, elevated markers of myocardial necrosis, and the diagnosis of ACS. The predictive validity of the model, as indicated by receiver operating characteristic curve area, was 85.7%, 87.8%, and 80.1% for 7-, 30-, and 365-day mortality, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Mortality may be predicted with high precision based on a statistical model. Identification of survivors by the use of a statistical model was superior as compared to simply ruling out the clinical diagnosis of ACS.
PubMed ID
17157678 View in PubMed
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Living alone and atypical clinical presentation are associated with higher mortality in patients with all components of the acute coronary syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78780
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007 Feb;14(1):152-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2007
Author
Nielsen Kirsten M
Larsen Mogens L
Foldspang Anders
Faergeman Ole
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Cardiology, Aarhus Sygehus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. rlg04kmn@as.aaa.dk
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007 Feb;14(1):152-4
Date
Feb-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cohort Studies
Coronary Disease - mortality - psychology
Denmark
Female
Housing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk
Socioeconomic Factors
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most prognostic studies of the acute coronary syndrome (ACS) have been performed in patients selected for inclusion into clinical trials. We stratified the risk of death during the year after hospitalization for a first episode of ACS in unselected patients based on clinical and socio-economic information. METHODS: In 2000-2002 we identified 457 consecutive unselected patients admitted to hospital with a first episode of ACS. Vital status was obtained from Danish national registers. RESULTS: The 1-year case-fatality proportion was 9.8%. Positive predictors of mortality were living alone, Q waves and diabetes. Negative predictors were chest pain, ST elevation and treatment with angioplasty or thrombolysis.
PubMed ID
17301642 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.